Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Manning levels

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Manning levels

    As part of my cadetship I'm conducting a survey on manning levels throughout the industry. Most of the people who have filled it out so far are cadets. It would be great to have some qualified officer's (cadets welcome though) views on manning levels and how often they are out of conformance with the STCW '95 regulations relating to hours of work and rest.

    The questionnaire is here:

    <a title="Here" href="https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dDMwa1k5ZFNlNnpFb3NhR2phUTcxSVE6M Q#gid=0">Here</a>

    or here,

    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/...cxSVE6MQ#gid=0


    Thanks, Andy

  • #2
    Done. Two small points though: -

    1) Most companies tend to have more crew than the SMC require and cadets usually won't see that certificate,

    2) HoR, you're basically asking cadets if their company is following the law or not...
    I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

    All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

    Comment


    • #3
      Done.

      As GM says above most companies have in excess of the minimum manning requirements onboard anyway, the minimum manning requirements are the minimum for the ship to put to sea, that does not mean that they are adequate for the ship to operate a busy commercial schedule.

      Fatigue is a huge issue on modern ships and one which can only be addressed on a worldwide basis, forcing sub standard shipping companies to raise their game will force their costs up and make well managed companies able to compete

      Port state control officers ignoring obviously badly managed ships which they would most likely have to detain in favour of a quick ISM audit on a well managed ships and a couple of nice easy non-conformities for having an ISPS sign with a running man instead of a hand (I sh1t you not) does not help the situation. If a PSC surveyor goes on a ship and makes some snotty observation about the hours of rest records not having been signed in the right colour crayon then he can chalk that up on hgis monthly total, if he goes onboard a rusty old wreck were the crew haven't slept for a week then he might not get home in time for tea.
      Go out, do stuff

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Clanky View Post
        Done.

        As GM says above most companies have in excess of the minimum manning requirements onboard anyway, the minimum manning requirements are the minimum for the ship to put to sea, that does not mean that they are adequate for the ship to operate a busy commercial schedule.

        Fatigue is a huge issue on modern ships and one which can only be addressed on a worldwide basis, forcing sub standard shipping companies to raise their game will force their costs up and make well managed companies able to compete

        Port state control officers ignoring obviously badly managed ships which they would most likely have to detain in favour of a quick ISM audit on a well managed ships and a couple of nice easy non-conformities for having an ISPS sign with a running man instead of a hand (I sh1t you not) does not help the situation. If a PSC surveyor goes on a ship and makes some snotty observation about the hours of rest records not having been signed in the right colour crayon then he can chalk that up on hgis monthly total, if he goes onboard a rusty old wreck were the crew haven't slept for a week then he might not get home in time for tea.
        Unless you're in some hell hole (Nigeria, Angola, Greece, etc) where you must do the "yes sir, no sir" bit, leave the slop chest unattended for a bit....
        I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

        All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thank you all for filling in the questionnaire and for your thoughts on the subject. Much appreciated.

          Andy

          Comment


          • #6
            I actually disagree that most ships operate above the Safe Manning Certificate, I'd say more ships operate exactly to the Safe Manning Certificate then not, particularly dry cargo vessels any vessel which are setup with just enough cabins to meet safe manning.
            Bear in mind that the Safe Manning is essentially agreed by the Owner and submitted to the Flag State for approval, and can have various exemptions incorporated which suit the owner. It should be posted on the bridge.

            Most dry cargo vessels even upto 100,000 GT operate with 8-12 crew, very difficult to respond properly to an emergency with that manning level.

            Comment


            • #7
              Safe manning levels are a work of fiction dreamt up by shipowners and rubberstamped by the IMO; there is little that is safe about them.
              '... English is about as pure as a cribhouse whore. We don't
              just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued other languages
              down alleyways to beat them unconscious and rifle their pockets for
              new vocabulary.' - James Davis Nicoll

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by penfold View Post
                Safe manning levels are a work of fiction dreamt up by shipowners and rubberstamped by the IMO; there is little that is safe about them.
                The idea of safe manning is to the minimum number of crew to actually sail the vessel from point A to point B, not do anything else and normally most companies exceed them (every company I've been in has).
                I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

                All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

                Comment


                • #9
                  GM, I think your blessed to have mostly worked with good companies, and especially those with high value liquid onboard (not talking about Beer Tankers, do they even exist?). A very very small percentage of the PSC detentions actually are Oil Tankers or LNG vessels.

                  There are many tight shipping companies out there who operate on the very bare minimum and on the edge of the law, especially in the General Cargo and tramping world.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by AncientMariner View Post
                    (not talking about Beer Tankers, do they even exist?)
                    Oh but what a wonderful world it would be if they did....
                    I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

                    All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      There are wine tankers so there's no technical reason why not.
                      '... English is about as pure as a cribhouse whore. We don't
                      just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued other languages
                      down alleyways to beat them unconscious and rifle their pockets for
                      new vocabulary.' - James Davis Nicoll

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I know this is straying off topic a bit, but at least it will bump the thread and get the OP's questionnaire seen a bit more.

                        Guinness used to have tankers running from Dublin to the UK, not sure when they stopped, but I would suspect it was when they started brewing the stuff in Englandshire.

                        linky
                        Go out, do stuff

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Clanky View Post
                          I know this is straying off topic a bit, but at least it will bump the thread and get the OP's questionnaire seen a bit more.

                          Guinness used to have tankers running from Dublin to the UK, not sure when they stopped, but I would suspect it was when they started brewing the stuff in Englandshire.

                          linky
                          In the 80's Guiness used to export concentrate to countries all over the world in 20 tonne liquid containers. We used to go to Dublin to load it for West Africa, especially Nigeria. It was a concentrate of the wort I think. Thick as mollasses, add a load of water and sugar and ferment! Don't quote me on what they actually did with it once they got it but it was so that Guiness did not share it's secret recipe. A bit like Coke shipping it's concentrate to European factories to make Coke!

                          We used to load tonnes of the stuff! Smelt lovely.

                          Ian
                          "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.
                          "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

                          "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X