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  • Errv

    There is a lot of ERRV work at the moment

    Both for engineers and deck officers..

    I know ERRV isn't what a lot of people want from a life at sea...

    But with an ITSO cert (£500) it's fairly easy to get into
    With a Boatmans cert as well (£400) even easier

    stuart.m@worldwide-rs.com

  • #2
    Thanks for the post Stuart.
    I took a relief job as Chief Mate on an ERRV around 7 years ago to fill a gap between finishing with one employer and starting with another. It was the choice between that or going several months without a pay check and whilst its not glamorous deep sea work, it was probably the easiest (albeit boring) money I've ever earned.

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    • #3
      I was considering quitting my current job and going for a little change working in the north sea, until I realised they were offering me 27k a year. No thanks. Hopefully since very little people wanna work on ERRVs, it'll give newly qualified cadets a chance at some work.

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      • #4
        Why do so many qualified officers not want to do ERRV work in the north sea? is the salary less than average or is it being on standby that they dont like??

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        • #5
          Originally posted by seafarer27 View Post
          Why do so many qualified officers not want to do ERRV work in the north sea? is the salary less than average or is it being on standby that they dont like??
          The salaries on ERRV are commensurate with the workload and complexity of the job which is fairly low. A typical trip may involve boarding in Aberdeen, steaming out to a rig and spending 4 weeks on standby there before turning back to Aberdeen for crew change. The ship is small with a small crew, possibly riding through rough weather and may include the occasional training with fast rescue craft. If it means getting the first few stamps in a discharge book or continued stable employment than it is of course a positive decision to work onboard an ERRV. Many of the people I met on my single ERRV trip were older guys who saw it as the semi retirement winding down job. You are always close to land and if you had family issues at home and needed to be back quickly than the job may also be suitable.
          Personally, if I was to return to a seagoing career I'd prefer yachts, passenger or specialist ships, but I'd never be too proud to work an ERRV if it was the choice between that and going on the dole.

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          • #6
            For me it's the paycut I'd be taking to go to a ****ter job. I did get offered to have my ITSO and FRC Boatman training paid for me which made it a little bit more tempting, and in all fairness it would be a good gateway to getting into offshore / PSV/AHTS etc, but I dont fancy spending a year on a 50m vessel in the north sea for that little money.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by trooper96 View Post
              For me it's the paycut I'd be taking to go to a ****ter job. I did get offered to have my ITSO and FRC Boatman training paid for me which made it a little bit more tempting, and in all fairness it would be a good gateway to getting into offshore / PSV/AHTS etc, but I dont fancy spending a year on a 50m vessel in the north sea for that little money.
              What are you working on now?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Chris1 View Post
                What are you working on now?
                Oceanographic research vessel, not really that interested in the science but the crew are all sound, sadly the money isnt amazing.

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