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  • Deep sea for British officer

    Hi!

    So I've been qualified as a 3rd/4th engineer for about a year now and after about 6 months i found a job as a motorman on a offshore/research vessel. I'm desperate to move to deep sea which is where i did my cadetship however, finding companies is proving difficult. I have been to the top ones such as BP,Maersk but no luck. Money isnt much of an issue and i don't mind long contracts but im looking for some help with where i might be able to get my foot in the door.

    Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    Tried cruise ships?

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    • #3
      I did when I first qualified but without cruise experience I was turned away

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      • #4
        That's surprising given the shortages of engineers at the moment. Perhaps worth another try. Not sure if CUK are hiring engineers at the moment but we certainly have been recently and I've sailed with 3/Es with no prior cruise experience.

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        • #5
          I will try again, any chance you could link me to CUK? having trouble finding them. Thank you for your advice

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          • #6
            https://www.jobtrain.co.uk/carnival/default.aspx

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            • #7
              Cruise ships are probably your best bet.

              Even if you’re not bothered about the money, working deep sea is rubbish due to the social isolation from not having many people with English as a first language who you can have conversations with.

              It’s not good for ones’ sanity being on a ship for extended period where everyone around you is non-intentionally socially excluding you by talking in their native Asian or Eastern European languages. Better sticking to cruise ships where you’ll at least have loads of people to talk to.

              With a lot of non-native English speaking crew it gets tiring only being able to have simple, stupid and broken conversations that are usually along the lines of “In my country we do _____, what do you do in your country?” or “_____ costs _____ in my country, what does _____ cost in your country?”. If you’re on with Filipino’s it gets tiring taking about pussy, pacquiao and cock fighting.

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              • #8
                Honestly that's what i kinda like about deep sea, the fact that if i want to talk i have to make an effort to speak to others in their language. Deep sea for me was fantastic as a cadet, my entire engine team were Filipino or Indian. I just see it as a challenge and maybe after a few years i do get tired of it but for now that's my aim.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by GarnetWomack View Post
                  Cruise ships are probably your best bet.

                  Even if you’re not bothered about the money, working deep sea is rubbish due to the social isolation from not having many people with English as a first language who you can have conversations with.

                  It’s not good for ones’ sanity being on a ship for extended period where everyone around you is non-intentionally socially excluding you by talking in their native Asian or Eastern European languages. Better sticking to cruise ships where you’ll at least have loads of people to talk to.

                  With a lot of non-native English speaking crew it gets tiring only being able to have simple, stupid and broken conversations that are usually along the lines of “In my country we do _____, what do you do in your country?” or “_____ costs _____ in my country, what does _____ cost in your country?”. If you’re on with Filipino’s it gets tiring taking about pussy, pacquiao and cock fighting.
                  Sums up my cadetship, watching dvds of previous cockfighting tournaments being a particular highlight.

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                  • #10
                    A bit of advice for everyone currently not on a contract and working.....

                    From this week "Turkey Fever" will start to strike EVERY Company. There will, all of a sudden, by hundreds of Officers who were due back to sea in the next three weeks who will develop an ailment that just means they will not be able to join their ship until the New Year. Whilst this will completely P1ss off the person they are relieving, it will cause a huge headache for the Company, because not only do they have an officer off sick they will also have an unhappy officer due to sign off who will see their Xmas and New Year at home going down the toilet.....

                    So.....

                    Get your CV up to date and polished. I am sure you can find an article on here somewhere that will help you polish it!

                    Next, post it, email it or hand deliver it to every company you can think of on Monday and then follow it up. First of all ring them to make sure the right person has it and then once a week just give them a courtesy call to politely remind them you are ready to go to sea.

                    Finally, pack a bag, make sure your ticket, passport, visa, jabs and ENG1 etc are all up to date and ready to go. You may get a phone call asking you if you can join a ship tomorrow morning and the first thing they will ask is "Are you ready to go?" Be ready to say "Yes, I can be ready to leave in one hour" and get on it straight away. There is nothing worse than having less than 24 hours notice to join a ship and being in a blind panic trying to get it all done.

                    Now, there will be many of you who will say "But I do not want to be away for Xmas!" - That is fine, but ask yourself if you want a job or not? You may also say "They will only give me one trip and then let me go" - again, fair comment, but it is another stamp in your discharge book, (or even your first stamp as a qualified Officer), and they may well remember how helpful you have been... Maybe the person you replaced does not have the protection of a UK style contract and if you prove to be better than them and more reliable then you may end up replacing them permanently. Just remember they may read this thread next year and be ready to replace you if you get "Turkey Fever"!!!!

                    Oh, yes, "Turkey Fever" does exist.... ask any shipping company!

                    Ian.
                    "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.

                    "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

                    "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Hatchorder View Post
                      Now, there will be many of you who will say "But I do not want to be away for Xmas!" - That is fine, but ask yourself if you want a job or not? You may also say "They will only give me one trip and then let me go" - again, fair comment, but it is another stamp in your discharge book, (or even your first stamp as a qualified Officer), and they may well remember how helpful you have been...

                      Ian.
                      It's those people who turn down work because it doesn't suit them who then complain when they don't have a job or seem to spend years not getting promoted. Unfortunately, to advance your career and maintain employment you sometimes need to make some sacrifices, especially in the early days.

                      I've had several instances where being flexible have benefited me, including travelling just before Christmas and being on a flight within 3 hours of a phone call.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by hotnspicy View Post
                        Sums up my cadetship, watching dvds of previous cockfighting tournaments being a particular highlight.
                        I cannot understand what kind of mind can be entertained by something so simple as watching the same 10 Pacquiao and cock fights on a continuous loop over and over for months on end, every single cock fight is virtually identical, and they have them on repeat, along with singing the same few karaoke songs.

                        Some of them are really immature, the only interest in “western” culture some of them had was watching children’s cartoons, you’d get old guys in their 60s sitting giggling like little kids when watching them. When they’re not doing all that they’re trying to get you to marry one of their young female relatives or getting you to put bolitas into your sausage.

                        Each to their own I guess, but when you’re stuck for months with nobody else to socialise or have a conversation with it can really get under your skin.

                        Even as a qualified officer you get social isolation on a lot ships with multinational crews, when you get big groups of Eastern Europeans like Poles or Croatians often they like to dominate messrooms by laughing and joking really loudly in their own languages, a lot of them are very nationalistic so they don’t care how it negatively affects other nationalities, in fact some of them even seem get some enjoyment out of it. If the working language of a ship is English then it should be English only in common areas, often the only time you see other people is at meal times so when you get the Eastern Europeans disrupting that time for everyone else you can get very lonely.

                        The best ships I’ve worked on are the ones where there are a good number of first language English speakers and only one or two people of any Eastern European language speaking group, it’s amazing how much more you enjoy your work when you can actually speak to people. A lot of the ships in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea have to be crewed exclusively by Norwegian speakers, when you speak to people that work there it’s amazing how happy they are working on ships where everyone is speaking the same language all the time with no isolation whatsoever.

                        It sucks but it’s just part and parcel of working on a ship I guess, the only saving grace is if the ship has good internet and telephone facilities so you can actually speak to people. If you didn’t have good internet on a lot of ships people would be signing off in a straitjacket.

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                        • #13
                          I agree that being at sea can be isolating and sailing with multi national crews is a challenge.

                          However, I completely disagree with some of your comments. Fair enough the working language of the ship may be English, but everyone has the right to speak their own language in their free time. Just because you don't speak that language doesn't mean you are being purposefully excluded.

                          Personally, I think it largely comes down to the amount of effort you are willing to put in. Learn some Tagalog, take in interest in your cultural differences, you might be surprised how accepting most people are when you show you want to understand where they are from/who they are.
                          There will always be times you feel isolated if you are the only person of your nationality onboard. I was the only Brit on my last trip at sea but I ended up learning a language (albeit the basics) and making some great friends!


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