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Will a conviction prevent my son from taking up a cadetship (if offered)

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  • Will a conviction prevent my son from taking up a cadetship (if offered)

    My son has recently expressed an interest in a Merchant navy cadetship but unfortunately he has an unspent conviction (it will be spent in 2017). He was pressured by a group of people to become involved in the crime and thoroughly regrets it. Would he be better advised to wait until his conviction is spent before considering applying for Cadetships?

  • #2
    I don't think many companies worry about Criminal Records, excepting possibly Cruise companies. Best advice would be to apply anyway, and be open about it. So long he informs them, and shows he has moved on past it I cannot see there will much issue in the side of getting a job at sea.

    HOWEVER, it may well affect his ability to get visa's for places like America, and for this you would need to get in touch with the Embassies. I mention America as they seem to be the strictest, and chances are they will not care about it being spent or not, really depends on what the conviction was for. Anything drug related, and he may struggle. It is possible though, I have friends who work in the Offshore Industry (not ships, but companies supplying specialist labour for the Oil Companies) who have had drug convictions and have managed to get Visa's for America, so all is not lost.

    Cheers,

    Phil

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    • #3
      Hi and welcome!

      It would probably depend on the nature of the offence to be honest. Most companies don't require CRB checks, but you can almost guarantee there'll be the usual declaration on the application form and honesty really is the best policy there.

      There's nothing stopping him applying, but I would read the forms very carefully and bear in mind that rejection on the grounds of having an unspent conviction now will be recorded and could affect future applications where declaration isn't necessary.

      There's also the visa issue to worry about. The likes of the US are quite strict.
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      • #4
        For America, it's not a case of convictions but Arrests. If you have an arrest for drugs or crimes of a "moral turpitude" then you may have difficulties with a visa...
        I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

        All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

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        • #5
          As the others say, the conviction will not be a bar to application. MOST Companies have conditional offers, I know Maersk do, and that conditional offer is subject to getting an ENG1 medical and getting a C1/D American Visa. Therefore I would suggest you start right there - go find out if the conviction would bar him from getting the relevant Visa, and if it does then you will severely reduce the number of companies you can apply to. Also, as far as Visa's are concerned there is no such thing as a spent conviction in the American's eyes so it makes no difference as to when you apply.

          The American Visa website is the starting point.

          Here are some pages to help:

          http://london.usembassy.gov/transit.html

          http://london.usembassy.gov/niv/add_crime.html

          Good luck.

          Ian
          "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.
          "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

          "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

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          • #6
            conviction

            No that's no problem unless it's with RFA

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            • #7
              I know if you are working on a ship operating in some countries outside of Europe, such as Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, Vietnam or Equatorial Guinea, you will need a police disclosure to get a work visa.

              So a criminal record will lead to being rejected a work visa, meaning no work. It's ok for work in Europe I guess as no Visa is needed.

              Contrary to what people expect, smaller poorer countries tend to be pretty strict on giving work visas to criminals.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by pignutpilot View Post
                I know if you are working on a ship operating in some countries outside of Europe, such as Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, Vietnam or Equatorial Guinea, you will need a police disclosure to get a work visa.

                So a criminal record will lead to being rejected a work visa, meaning no work. It's ok for work in Europe I guess as no Visa is needed.

                Contrary to what people expect, smaller poorer countries tend to be pretty strict on giving work visas to criminals.
                On a normal foreign flagged ships operating into those countries you do not need a work visa, I'm not sure when a work visa would apply, but most likely in a local flagged ship or a ship solely operating in the particular countries waters?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by YoungMariner View Post
                  On a normal foreign flagged ships operating into those countries you do not need a work visa, I'm not sure when a work visa would apply, but most likely in a local flagged ship or a ship solely operating in the particular countries waters?
                  Aye, if the ship's only going to operate in those waters then a work visa or visa of some sort will apply. Brazil is a good example of this as you have to have a work visa and be registered with the federal police and what not...
                  I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

                  All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Cornish Pirate View Post
                    No that's no problem unless it's with RFA
                    It might be worth checking with recruitment if he's looking at the RFA. Although all convictions show up on the SC check a rejection isn't automatic, it depends on the offence, the length of time since the conviction etc.

                    But if his conviction shows he can't be trusted with restricted material (fraud for instance), or that he could be blackmailed over the offence, then that's pretty much an instant fail.

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                    • #11
                      To the OP, one of the guys we were at college with works with one of the larger two recruiting companies. He was convicted with two counts of assault and a breach of the peace after being in the wrong place at the wrong time. he told the interviewer it was just a very unlucky night and had no problems getting in. with regards to higher offences, ie drugs, fraud and GBH im pretty sure you might find the visa process is more of a worry.

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