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  • Deck Work

    In March i joined the bulk carrier in Thailand. We loaded sugar as our cargo and sailed to Iraq. It took around 21 days to reach Iraq anchorage area. So, since that day till date our ship is still waiting to discharge the cargo (i.e around 4 months since March). The problem is since the day our ship reached Iraq, the chief officer is making me do rigorous deck work. I've been chipping, grinding and painting every single day. I'm doing 8 hours deck work every day. I asked the Captain to give me bridge watches, so he gave me 8 days bridge watch in a month. wtf?!! The company's training manager is not responding to my emails.
    The amount of physical work on this ship is insane. I don't thing such kind of job is legal to be performed at sea.
    These are the jobs i've done till date: Chipping and painting of Deck Stores, entire Deck port and stbd side, cross decks, hatch covers, hatch coamings, aft mooring station, bridge wings, forecastle,all 4 deck cranes, provision cranes. As of now they are making us chip ship sides. These work should be done in Dry Dock. The company is making us do these jobs to save money if i m not wrong.
    Captain doesn't care about us. All of the officers including the Master were OS > AB > officer. Maybe this is the reason why they treat us like ordinary seamen. The crew is Syrian and I hate them. You have no idea how hard it is to be on this ship with them.

    What are my available options? Can i complain to anyone regarding this. How am i supposed to complete my MNTB being on anchor for so long? I have a 1 year contract and since I'm signing off early, will I have to show some reason in MNTB cuz i read somewhere that in case i don't complete my contract, I'll have to provide good enough reason as to why i did not complete my contract. I'm taking photos of all the work i am being forced to do as evidence. Is there any way to bring this company down? Help me please..

  • #2
    Are you following a UK cadetship? If that is the case then you certainly shouldn't have a one year contract and won't be required to provide evidence of why you have signed off early. Most people following the UK system will only stay on board for about 4-5 months at a time so going home now seems perfectly reasonable.

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    • #3
      What nationality are you? Which manning agent are you with? What contract did you sign?
      I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

      All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

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      • #4
        I don't think he is British... Either way that sounds like hell on Earth.

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        • #5
          What phase are you on? It's not unusual for the entire 1st phase of a cadetship to be entirely deck work and honestly what you've described does sound like pretty standard tasks. If a little excessive.

          As has previously been asked, what cadetship are you following?

          If you are concerned on a professional level that the work is not your progressing your portfolio you should initially raise this with your DSTO onboard, then if no joy your company training manager, following that it is possible to seek advice from your training centre or indeed the MNTB. However, it shouldn't come to that.

          To boldly go.....
          Forum Administrator
          OfficerCadet.com

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          • #6
            Originally posted by bobofinga View Post
            I don't think he is British... Either way that sounds like hell on Earth.
            Dunno like. I think if given the choice between anchor watch on the bridge for four months or deck work for the same period I would probably choose the latter.

            Yeah I didn't think he was British by the sound of the post but then he did mention the MNTB which confused me a bit.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by EH75 View Post
              Yeah I didn't think he was British by the sound of the post but then he did mention the MNTB which confused me a bit.
              Almost certainly a cadet from India who has studied partly in the UK towards a UK CoC. It's very common at some of the UK nautical colleges.

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              • #8
                Firstly trying to "Bring the company down" is a bad attitude to have and if that's how you feel you need to go home now! secondly I cant see anything wrong with the deck work you are doing (in fact many including myself did a lot more hours than that)
                Last edited by Pilot Chris; 22 July 2013, 05:12 AM. Reason: spelling
                Pilotage - It's just a controlled allision

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                • #9
                  Also remember we all sign 1 or 2 year contracts...thats how long articles run for and theoretically (technically) we can or could be held to that...I know I know MLC2006 and actual real contracts change that, but not yet!

                  However sounds like every deck cadet I ever met, chipping and painting in the sun while there is a chance.....and yes "taking down the company" is a bit of wrong attitude.......
                  Trust me I'm a Chief.

                  Views expressed by me are mine and mine alone.
                  Yes I work for the big blue canoe company.
                  No I do not report things from here to them as they are quite able to come and read this stuff for themselves.


                  Twitter:- @DeeChief

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                  • #10
                    Having not been to sea, I might be missing something here but 8 hours of painting and the rest doesn't exactly sound too strenuous?


                    And 4 months anchored up? surely that's a colossal waste of income potential for the company?
                    It was like that when I got here.


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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by chris123321 View Post
                      Having not been to sea, I might be missing something here but 8 hours of painting and the rest doesn't exactly sound too strenuous?


                      And 4 months anchored up? surely that's a colossal waste of income potential for the company?
                      It's more the chipping side of things which is unpleasant. Painting I can do all day and be perfectly happy with but put a chipping hammer in my hand...

                      4 months anchored isn't massively surprising if its a tanker or off charter ship. No cargo = no money so better to anchor or drift and save port fees

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                      • #12
                        I prefer chipping myself. Especially if using a chipping hammer or needle gun. Great stress reliever.

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                        • #13
                          Hold a needle gun for more than 15 minutes and you feel like your whole body is vibrating ... do not enjoy it!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by chris123321 View Post
                            And 4 months anchored up? surely that's a colossal waste of income potential for the company?
                            Not exactly. If the ship is still loaded and on charter then the charter day rate will still apply, therefore the Owner is still getting paid for the ship to sit there and do nothing. 4 months isn't that long at all to be honest.

                            Originally posted by bridgemonkey View Post
                            4 months anchored isn't massively surprising if its a tanker or off charter ship. No cargo = no money so better to anchor or drift and save port fees
                            You still have to pay to be in an anchorage. Some parts of the world (yes Fujairah, I'm looking at you), only allow you to stay in the Anchorage for up 10 days. After that, clear off for a bit and then come back and anchor up. Also, drifting tends to be more expensive than anchoring as the cost of the fuel you're burning to return you to your original position tends to be more than the cost of port fees.

                            However, if it looks like the ship is going to be off-hire for a fair length of time then most owner's tend to reduce the manning level on board to that of the Minimum Safe Manning Certificate or go the whole hog and put the vessel into a deep layup state.
                            I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

                            All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by bridgemonkey View Post
                              It's more the chipping side of things which is unpleasant. Painting I can do all day and be perfectly happy with but put a chipping hammer in my hand...

                              4 months anchored isn't massively surprising if its a tanker or off charter ship. No cargo = no money so better to anchor or drift and save port fees
                              Fair enough, just the OP made it sound like it was the end of days and back breaking slavery.

                              I was under the impression that companies would make every effort to have ships on the move with full cargo non-stop, learn something new every day then!
                              It was like that when I got here.


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