Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Dynamic Positioning Vessels

Collapse
X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Dynamic Positioning Vessels

    This post in anonymous as I do not want my employer to possibly recognize I am interested in another vessel type/ company.

    After completing my training, I would like to transfer over to a dynamic positioning vessel type. I have a few questions about this ship type.

    I am interested in the work, not so much the salary. What is actually involved? Is the main functional difference just using a joystick and maneuvering around a certain point? I am linking this with PSV, but is this in general the main purpose? I have looked at it on Wiki, but I would like a DPO's honest opinion.

    I have been told watches are 4 on, 8 off and 6 on, 6 off, which occurs more often? I would think 6:6, but if this is the case, do you do deck work etc too? In other words will you go over 12 hours work a day? Is there someone who does deck work and LSA separately?

    Why does the industry want British officers?

    On a PSV, how does the general cargo operations work?

    Is it difficult work? Must you be constantly in the seat controlling the vessel?

    What types of DP vessels would you recommend and why?

  • #2
    Hi,

    Working 6 hours on/off (anchor handling/ supply) is the norm as is 12on/off (more often DSV/ Construction). My vessel has a Captain, Chief Mate, 2nd Mate and two DPOs who are basically 3rd Mates and are Junior Watchkeepers (I work on a Construction/ Anchor Handler), some companies have set ups similar to this. It is generally a requirement to have two mates/DPOs on the bridge while on DP/ in a 500m zone, one hour on/off DP. If winches come into the equation you can be sitting on either DP/ at a winch for literally hours.

    Yes you still have to carry out normal duties, overtime is the norm or you squeeze maintenance/ drills into sailing time.

    No, you do not just sit manouvering on joystick, hard to explain but DP is basically an expensive computer based helmsman who uses reference systems to tell the propulsion systems/ thrusters how much they need to use to counter environmental factors such as sea/current and wind. You can manouver on joystick or by feeding in set moves to the system. It is a very good work tool although I find it pretty boring, manual every time! More fun/ challenging! I find DP is either boring or stressful and boring, can be like an anchor watch I guess.

    As for British Officers, I would be wary and say that more and more Europeans are losing their jobs to the Far East but on DSV/ Construction and Anchor Handling their is still a core European Crew.

    I would recommend Anchor Handling... exciting, interesting and none of the nonsense that comes with client/project boats.

    Anyway hope that wan´t overtly pessimistic, if there´s anything please ask... internet bit slow in the Atlantic right enough!

    L.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi Laura, thanks for your reply.

      Do you have any ratings on-board the vessel?

      So the general requirement is to have two officers on the bridge at any time in a 500 m zone (I suppose that is 500 meters depth?). So even though two officers are on the bridge, they both take turns and alternate who operates the DP controls? I take it the other officer just catches up with other tasks - plotting positions, weather observations, chart corrections etc.

      Do you have a rating for a lookout? Or is this done by the officer?

      I take it when you involve winches this is to do with handling anchors or towing?

      So the system is more automatic, but someone needs to be there to monitor it - or in some cases operate it manually. So what sort of fuel is used? As I suppose the engines are ready at any time?

      If you find it stressful and/or boring, why do you do it?

      That's another thing, are you using your own internet or does your company provide it? Who do you work for (if you don't mind me asking?)

      What sort of ships did you work on for your cadetship? Did you move straight to DP or did you try other ship types?

      Thanks again

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi,

        No worries. Just to clarify the 500m zone is the safety boundary around offshore installations (mainly rigs/ platforms/ FPSOs), you cannot legally enter (there are exceptions such as emergencies) without prior permission from the offshore installation.

        If we're sailing we sometimes have ratings on lookout, but often as we have two Mates on watch we have two on the bridge anyway and don't need an extra lookout- but sometimes we have one anyway. We have ratings with marine crews between 13-35 crew depending on vessel type. Generally with one mate on DP, the other is doing 'normal' Mate stuff- paperwork, passage planning, corrections, safety checks and so on.

        You're right, it is automatic (or it can be) although it can be completely manual as well or combination of both.

        Engines are ready at any time, generally DP vessels are highly manouverable- often two variable pitch props with nozzles and becker style rudders or azipods, then thrusters into the equation, so even sailing they're nice to handle. Yes when we're on DP there is always someone monitoring it- we don't sail on DP (although you can do that), it is for working close in to installations or subsea where a high degree of accuracy/ station keeping is important for the work, thinking centimetres/ one or two metres rather than cables.

        Winches are for towing, working anchors for rigmoves, or subsea work.

        Fuel depends on the vessel- age/ type.

        I started on DP boats, I did try to go deep sea-but the opportunities just weren't there, sometimes I think I would just love to go work deep sea where you get to sail with just 'marine crew' and not a bunch of non sailors asking you to move half a metre at a time!

        However I do it because I have a great crew and Captain, I love being at sea and other aspects of the job make up for the bits I don't like, there's more to offshore than DP, plus offshore is an industry that still employs a high number of Europeans (something I very much keep in mind as a woman), it's not always perfect but the positives outweigh the negatives.

        I'm not going to say who I work for, they treat me pretty well and I wouldn't want any personal views to reflect on them- they are a large Scandinavian owned company with offshore vessels worldwide, the pay is decent and the boats well looked after. I like working for them 95% of the time!

        We have internet, it's not always great but better than many deep sea vessels.

        Anyway, hope that helps!

        L.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by laura View Post
          Hi,

          No worries. Just to clarify the 500m zone is the safety boundary around offshore installations (mainly rigs/ platforms/ FPSOs), you cannot legally enter (there are exceptions such as emergencies) without prior permission from the offshore installation.

          If we're sailing we sometimes have ratings on lookout, but often as we have two Mates on watch we have two on the bridge anyway and don't need an extra lookout- but sometimes we have one anyway. We have ratings with marine crews between 13-35 crew depending on vessel type. Generally with one mate on DP, the other is doing 'normal' Mate stuff- paperwork, passage planning, corrections, safety checks and so on.

          You're right, it is automatic (or it can be) although it can be completely manual as well or combination of both.

          Engines are ready at any time, generally DP vessels are highly manouverable- often two variable pitch props with nozzles and becker style rudders or azipods, then thrusters into the equation, so even sailing they're nice to handle. Yes when we're on DP there is always someone monitoring it- we don't sail on DP (although you can do that), it is for working close in to installations or subsea where a high degree of accuracy/ station keeping is important for the work, thinking centimetres/ one or two metres rather than cables.

          Winches are for towing, working anchors for rigmoves, or subsea work.

          Fuel depends on the vessel- age/ type.

          I started on DP boats, I did try to go deep sea-but the opportunities just weren't there, sometimes I think I would just love to go work deep sea where you get to sail with just 'marine crew' and not a bunch of non sailors asking you to move half a metre at a time!

          However I do it because I have a great crew and Captain, I love being at sea and other aspects of the job make up for the bits I don't like, there's more to offshore than DP, plus offshore is an industry that still employs a high number of Europeans (something I very much keep in mind as a woman), it's not always perfect but the positives outweigh the negatives.

          I'm not going to say who I work for, they treat me pretty well and I wouldn't want any personal views to reflect on them- they are a large Scandinavian owned company with offshore vessels worldwide, the pay is decent and the boats well looked after. I like working for them 95% of the time!

          We have internet, it's not always great but better than many deep sea vessels.

          Anyway, hope that helps!

          L.
          Ah yeas, I remember looking at that on many charts.

          I was going to say, if you ever end up in a situation where there is a risk of collision, there shouldn't be many problems.

          I am a little worried about this. I am with deep sea at the moment and I would like to stay with deep sea for a while, travel across most of the globe and then move onto DP. However I was told you need to fix your ship types pretty early in your profession.

          I have had offers from a DP shipping company for when I complete my cadetship. But they just want a COC and 6 months sea time as an officer. Not any interviews, they will just take me on. This worries me - it is too simple. But I wouldn't want to pass on such an opportunity and they will pay for my training too.

          The thing I like about DP is the working ratio. 1 on/off, 2 on/off. You have enough time to go on holiday (and enough money) come home for a few weeks and by that time you will be looking forward to going back on ship again. It sounds fantastic.

          Thanks again for your help, I have a lot to think about.

          Comment


          • #6
            There are other companies / vessel types where junior officers can work one for one.

            As for fixing vessel type early on, I am currently working offshore having started after 20 years at sea, although I have had to sail as second engineer for a while after 5 years sailing as chief, there are plenty of others within the company who have recently come offshore so you should be able to keep your options open.

            As for preferring British officers that does not really seem to be the case with the company I work for, bit of a United Nations job on here and a real eye opener for me in terms of the idea that British officers are somehow better than other nationalities, just not the case anymore.
            Go out, do stuff

            Comment


            • #7
              'But they just want a COC and 6 months sea time as an officer. Not any interviews, they will just take me on. This worries me - it is too simple.'

              This is ridiculous.

              You have NO offshore experience - NO DP experience - NO AHTS experience. You don't even know what a 500m zone is - its comical.

              Your not going to get the job - I promise you.

              Comment


              • #8
                I had no offshore experience, no DP experience, no AHTS experience and I got employed as second engineer with a 2 hour handover.
                Go out, do stuff

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm with Clanky, worked with a few people who've never been offshore in their life and have landed a job, admittedly they have tended to come from higher ranks, sailed with an ex cruise ship Captain who started as second mate.. that's pretty normal- to take a rank or two below until you build up your experience particularly in anchor handling/ construction vesssels/ dive support. I've also worked with Filippino crew who've started as DPO trainees having come from coasters/ deep sea. A big culture shock usually and not always in a positive way.

                  There's lots of offshore Jobs beginning to open up at the moment, I don't know who anon is referring to but at least two of the bigger players in the industry seem to going through a large recruitment drive- Subsea 7 being one.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    From what I can gather, the OP is a cadet and this DP company have made an offer to take him/her on as a trainee DP officer. It kind of makes sense for companies to grab the newly qualified folk, because they can train them up and mould them to be the kind of officer that the company wants, rather than getting more experienced officers in who have developed their own /their previous company's way of doing things, (and possibly a few bad habits). Carnival is doing exactly the same thing! http://www.officercadet.com/showthre...on-Carnival-UK

                    Size4riggerboots

                    Moderator
                    Blog tWitterings Flickr Tumblr Faceache

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                      'But they just want a COC and 6 months sea time as an officer. Not any interviews, they will just take me on. This worries me - it is too simple.'

                      This is ridiculous.

                      You have NO offshore experience - NO DP experience - NO AHTS experience. You don't even know what a 500m zone is - its comical.

                      Your not going to get the job - I promise you.
                      Perhaps you misunderstood. Take me on – as in accept me for training. I never said anything about plopping myself on a vessel immediately.

                      Originally posted by laura View Post
                      There's lots of offshore Jobs beginning to open up at the moment, I don't know who anon is referring to but at least two of the bigger players in the industry seem to going through a large recruitment drive- Subsea 7 being one.
                      Exactly, the company in question might rhyme with "Wire"- Might only be missing one letter from that word too! They intend to recruit 500 officers within the next few years due to a massive fleet expansion.

                      Originally posted by size4riggerboots View Post
                      From what I can gather, the OP is a cadet and this DP company have made an offer to take him/her on as a trainee DP officer. It kind of makes sense for companies to grab the newly qualified folk, because they can train them up and mould them to be the kind of officer that the company wants, rather than getting more experienced officers in who have developed their own /their previous company's way of doing things, (and possibly a few bad habits). Carnival is doing exactly the same thing! http://www.officercadet.com/showthre...on-Carnival-UK
                      This is correct, they came to my training establishment and said "We want you after you get your COC ... call us up". Dependent on experience, they stated you could start at a cadet level or as a DPO. The company want to employ officers early provide them with a decent starting job, but most importantly to make them stay. They emphasized that they wanted you to stay for a long duration and to train the next generation.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        can i join any offshore vessel as a training officer with fresh coc and container experience

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                          Exactly, the company in question might rhyme with "Wire"- Might only be missing one letter from that word too! They intend to recruit 500 officers within the next few years due to a massive fleet expansion.
                          500 officers?
                          Massive fleet expansion?

                          Who/where/when did you get this information?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Dotc0m View Post

                            500 officers?
                            Massive fleet expansion?

                            Who/where/when did you get this information?
                            This thread is over 5 years old...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Up to date information is the best information?! Worth noting that subsequent to those comments Subsea7 nearly went bankrupt and laid off/ TC'd out a heap of ships...

                              I suppose the message is it's a very volatile market and you should just go with what you think will be enjoyable/interesting and worry about next year in the next year.

                              Comment

                              Previously entered content was automatically saved. Restore or Discard.
                              Auto-Saved
                              x
                              Insert: Thumbnail Small Medium Large Fullsize Remove  
                              x
                              x
                              Working...
                              X