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  • #76
    Originally posted by EH75 View Post
    What sort of trip lengths do the RFA do and how easy is it to transfer to them after doing your cadetship elsewhere? Are you eligible for MOD pensions and any other MOD related benefits?
    4 month trips, for which you get 83 days leave, slightly worse than a 4:3 ratio, but courses and things make it likely you will do 3 months or more between trips. The long trips and poor leave ratio compared to other parts of the industry is one of the biggest reasons for junior to middle ranking officers leaving.

    Pensions are Civil Service (there is no MoD specific pension scheme). I guess you can access any Civil Service related stuff. Forces/MoD discounts, for what they are worth. Sports facilities.

    How easy it is to join as a qualified officer varies. The current preference seems to be to hire people as cadets, but it used to be common to hire qualified officers and I expect it will be again. The temporary positions mentioned above may well become permanent if the rate of cadets staying on does not match management expectations (and nothing ever does).

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    • #77
      Originally posted by YoungMariner View Post
      From my website, 2012 salary scales.
      What website is that?

      Steve what do the X and Es in brackets refer to?
      Which agency is the RFA using? Do the temp staff become reservists, do the admiralty interview board etc
      What's the difference between a first officer and a chief officer? I though it was only cruise ships that engaged in the proliferation of titles.

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      • #78
        Originally posted by Lewis View Post
        What website is that?
        Try his signature block. (Though the site doesn't seem to be opening at this moment.)

        Steve what do the X and Es in brackets refer to?
        X = eXecutive = deck officers

        Which agency is the RFA using? Do the temp staff become reservists, do the admiralty interview board etc
        Don't know. Probably. Don't know, probably not.

        What's the difference between a first officer and a chief officer? I though it was only cruise ships that engaged in the proliferation of titles.
        1st Officer is navigator and/or operations officer, and not usually a watchkeeper. As navigator he produces passage plans and draws up and executes pilotages - i.e. although we may take a pilot, the navigator has charge of the ship and the con, usually until just off the berth. He also handles immediate aspects of the ship's programme - arranging replenishments, rendezvous, sometimes formations if in company. The ops task is more about longer term planning for future taskings: tomorrow, next week, next year.

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        • #79
          Originally posted by Steve View Post

          1st Officer is navigator and/or operations officer, and not usually a watchkeeper. As navigator he produces passage plans and draws up and executes pilotages - i.e. although we may take a pilot, the navigator has charge of the ship and the con, usually until just off the berth. He also handles immediate aspects of the ship's programme - arranging replenishments, rendezvous, sometimes formations if in company. The ops task is more about longer term planning for future taskings: tomorrow, next week, next year.
          Then what do the watch keepers do when they are not on watch?

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          • #80
            Originally posted by Lewis View Post
            Then what do the watch keepers do when they are not on watch?
            3rd Off - lifeboats and LSA, look after explosives magazines (this alone takes 30-60 mins per day on a typical ship), met. officer (may have to produce daily briefings), logbooks (i.e. make LSA and loadline related entries for the master to autograph), watch and station bill (up to 150 or more crew to assign to tasks at emergency stations), various other bull**** jobs.

            2nd Off - guns, gun crews, gunnery/funnery, chart corrections (no joke when you carry many complete folios), various other admin stuff.

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            • #81
              Originally posted by Steve View Post
              4 month trips, for which you get 83 days leave, slightly worse than a 4:3 ratio, but courses and things make it likely you will do 3 months or more between trips. The long trips and poor leave ratio compared to other parts of the industry is one of the biggest reasons for junior to middle ranking officers leaving.

              Pensions are Civil Service (there is no MoD specific pension scheme). I guess you can access any Civil Service related stuff. Forces/MoD discounts, for what they are worth. Sports facilities.

              How easy it is to join as a qualified officer varies. The current preference seems to be to hire people as cadets, but it used to be common to hire qualified officers and I expect it will be again. The temporary positions mentioned above may well become permanent if the rate of cadets staying on does not match management expectations (and nothing ever does).

              Cheers for that. Not necessarily thinking of applying to them, just don't really know anything about the RFA given there are no RFA cadets at my college. Interesting stuff anyway.

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              • #82
                Was just wondering, regarding the tax thing, do you still have to pay some tax or what? I'm only 17, so I'm not entirely sure all of the tax laws, but £20,000 tax free at 21 sounds too good to be true, surely?

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                • #83
                  As long as you meet the inland revenue SED requirements, you are tax free on all of your seafarer earnings.

                  http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/cnr/seafaq2.htm

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                  • #84
                    Someone will be along with the exact rules in a minute but as I understand it if you are out of the country for more than 6 months of the year then under the seafarers earnings dedcutions scheme you do not have to pay income tax. I think some employers may deduct it initially and then you can claim it back at the end of the year but the end result is the same. And yes, if you start at 16 then wages of £20K tax free at 21 are a bit conservative if anything. I would reckon that if you are with a good employer in the right sector of the industry and get your OOW at the age of 19 you could feasibly be on close to double that. Few months until I qualify so none of this information is first hand, just "as I understand it".

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                    • #85
                      You still have to pay National Insurance - Class 1 for UK and IOM vessels and Class 3 for Foreign Flag. Many people with BP got 12k National Insurance bills, they got back taxed for 5 years of earnings.

                      The SED is only applicable to Income Tax.

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                      • #86
                        Do you claim back NI if your employer has taken class one and your work on a non UK/IOM vessel? I NI was also dependant on where the employer was based not just the flag of the ship?

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                        • #87
                          Originally posted by IFHP View Post
                          You still have to pay National Insurance - Class 1 for UK and IOM vessels and Class 3 for Foreign Flag. Many people with BP got 12k National Insurance bills, they got back taxed for 5 years of earnings.

                          The SED is only applicable to Income Tax.
                          There have been other threads which have stated/implied that we're NI exempt, though some pay voluntarily. Does anyone have a link to something definitive on this?

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                          • #88
                            I can 100% confirm if you are UK or IOM Flag regardless of where your employer is based YOU are liable for Class 1 National Insurance contributions.

                            If your employer takes off Class 1 NI that means your employer is contributing due to a UK prescence i.e. office. You can not claim back NI only Income Tax.

                            http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/cnr/seafaqni3.htm

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                            • #89
                              Working on a British ship

                              If you are employed as a mariner on a British ship and you are domiciled or resident in the UK you will have to pay Class 1 contributions.
                              There are special rules for mariners resident in another EEA State but working on a British flagged ship
                              Your employer, or the person paying your wages, will also have to pay Class 1 contributions if they live in or have a place of business in the UK.
                              If your employer or the person paying your wages does not live in, or have a place of business in the UK, they will not have to pay Class 1 contributions.
                              If you work wholly or mainly within Category A, B, C or D waters and your employer supplies you to work for a business in the UK, then you may have a 'host' employer who will be required to pay Class 1 contributions.
                              If there is no employer, payer of wages, 'host' employer or other secondary contributor in the UK to deduct your Class 1 contribution from pay via a PAYE scheme, then you will need to pay your contributions directly to HM Revenue & Customs. Your contributions will still count for benefit.
                              From 1 May 2010, an employer in another Member State of the European Union is treated as having a place of business in the UK for National Insurance contribution purposes and National Insurance contribution rules apply to that employer, where their mariner has to pay Class 1 National Insurance contributions.

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                              • #90
                                It sucks if you have to work on a UK flagged ship and live in the UK.

                                Another 10-15% off our salaries through national insurance.

                                All for David CaMORON,the ConDem coalition or LIEbour to squander.

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