Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Standby Vessels

Collapse
X
  •  
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Standby Vessels

    Sorry if this isn't appropriate for the Anonymous Forum, I just didn't feel comfortable asking this under my name incase the wrong eyes see it.

    I have completed my sea time with my sponsor, an offshore services company, on their standby vessels. I have since been offered a 2 year contract with them, providing I pass my oral exam.

    I'm just looking for advice on possible effects on future career prospects. I have been told that if I take the contract, and for example, I then want to apply to work on Supply Vessels, they may look at my vessel history and think I have been sat doing nothing for a month at a time, as companies 'look down' on the standby industry.

    Is there truth in this or will it really not make a difference?

  • #2
    I'm sure somebody will correct me, but it might matter if you are deck or engine? I remember in dry-dock the deck cadets being radge that we weren't going anywhere. Might also be applicable to you situation.

    Comment


    • #3
      My attitude to it would be that it is better than nothing. Are a company likely to take someone on who has a couple of standby trips as an officer or someone who has no experience whatsoever? I would take the standby job and start looking for things in other sectors of the industry at the same time. Then at least you will have money coming in and be gaining experience (however limited) whilst looking for another job.

      My own situation is that I will not be offered a contract by my sponsoring company (they don't emply British officers) and intend to apply to everyone under the sun upon gaining my ticket. Whilst I have absolutely no desire to work on standby boats given what I have heard about them, if I was to be offered a job with them then I would certainly take it although I would be looking for something better at the same time.

      Comment


      • #4
        Sorry, I should have said that I am a deck cadet.

        I also didn't mean to sound ungrateful at all, as I realise that a guaranteed job is something that a lot of people in the current economic climate do not have the luxury of.

        It's just slightly off putting when you join a standby vessel as a cadet and the whole crew, including officers, tell you to steer clear of standby boats when qualified.

        I suppose it wouldn't cause any harm if I apply to companies before signing anything to see if I get results back.

        Thanks for the replies.

        Comment


        • #5
          What are the consequences if you leave your job before the two year contract is up? Is it financial penalty? A lot of companies have this for courses eapecially chief mates and masters? Like could you save up enough to pay this in three months for example?

          Tricky one, I know a lot of guys who think going via a stand by job will be a short cut into offshore but it can go either way.. including being a career killer... not fair really, I've got a lot of respect for you guys in stand by, especially when the storms start rolling in over winter, plus I find the smaller the ship, the more you've got to be able to do at a lesser rank. Tricky but still it's easier to find a job when you have one. How long before you have to decide?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by laura View Post
            What are the consequences if you leave your job before the two year contract is up? Is it financial penalty? A lot of companies have this for courses eapecially chief mates and masters? Like could you save up enough to pay this in three months for example?

            Tricky one, I know a lot of guys who think going via a stand by job will be a short cut into offshore but it can go either way.. including being a career killer... not fair really, I've got a lot of respect for you guys in stand by, especially when the storms start rolling in over winter, plus I find the smaller the ship, the more you've got to be able to do at a lesser rank. Tricky but still it's easier to find a job when you have one. How long before you have to decide?
            I think it can be up to something like a ?2000 penalty. I've been fortunate enough that I am not obliged to accept the contract, I've seen now that Clyde Marine have started expecting new cadets to sign a pre contract that says if after their training they don't take a job with their sponsor, they will have to pay CMT up to ?2000.

            My orals are on Thursday, so if I pass, my sponsor will get my contract out to me straight away. I don't really have a problem serving on standby vessels for 2 calendar years, which is only 1 year at sea. 2 year in the grand scheme of things is nothing, I'm just worried about any negative implications it may have in the long run.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by laura View Post
              What are the consequences if you leave your job before the two year contract is up? Is it financial penalty? A lot of companies have this for courses eapecially chief mates and masters? Like could you save up enough to pay this in three months for example?
              A contract is a legally binding agreement on both parties. If the company cancels your contract then you can sue them for the remainder of the contract. However, the practicalities of winning depend on where the contract is issued and in which country you fight it. The same goes the other way. If you break a contract then the employer has the right to sue you for losses associated with you leaving. That could mean they bring in agency staff and they sue you for the difference between what they would have paid you and what they pay the other person. Alternatively they can pay for someone else to do the training and sue you for that cost. Again it depends on country, relevant law and wording of a contract ......

              In reality though this is a bit of "straw law". They could sue you and spend years recovering the money and so many will not go after it all. However if your agreement says "the cost of training is ?10,00 and if you leave within 2 years you are responsible for repaying it all", or words to that effect, then they can just issue you with an invoice, give you 30 days to pay, take you to court if you don't and then bankrupt you.

              This is a bit of an over simplification, but it can, and does, happen. So my advice to anyone is really to "suck it up" and do the time. The only other way is to get yourself dismissed, but then there is the consequence of no reference and secret black lists etc.

              There is also another thing here, about honour and dignity. Your employer has laid out money to train you, they generally kept their word to you. (If they did not you should have raised the matter before now), and so you owe them the same in return. If you break your word then it is a matter of your honour in question. Again, some will say, this is a bit of a simplification but in my experience there was never a situation that could not be resolved by dealing with it properly rather than burying your head in the sand. Again, they will have benefited by training you so people could argue that they profit from training you, but that is what all businesses have to do, otherwise there is no reason for them to exist.

              If you do not want to finish a contract you have agreed then talk to your employer and negotiate a way out with honour, that way you have not burnt your bridges. As I always say to people - if we have to look at the small print in the contract / agreement then our relationship is already over, let's be adult and sit down and talk it through and come to an agreement that we are both comfortable with.

              Ian
              "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.
              "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

              "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                ..... My orals are on Thursday, ....
                Good Luck.

                Originally posted by Unregistered View Post
                ..... 2 year in the grand scheme of things is nothing, I'm just worried about any negative implications it may have in the long run.
                I think the implications of having no experience as a qualified officer, or a long period of unemployment would be more damaging than having 12 months seatime on standby vessels. There is also the thought that you are much closer to doing your Mates/Masters. Seatime is Seatime!

                It is worth finding out what the financial penalty is and then making the decision about whether you will pay it if you find a job. Don't forget it is easier to find a job from a job. Make an informed choice once you know the facts....

                .... but first pass them damned orals!

                Ian
                "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.
                "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

                "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

                Comment


                • #9
                  seems like common sense to me if you have better job take it. If you don't thake this one.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thank you Hatchorder for the good luck wishes. To say i'm a little nervous would be a massive understatement.

                    I see what you are saying about honour etc, and I do agree. Any financial penalties here are not a problem as I haven't signed anything yet and I am not obliged to take the contract. I agree with what you are saying completely about how sea time is sea time and I would of course be 12 months closer to getting in my seatime for my mates.

                    I also realise that having a guaranteed job waiting for me if I pass is a huge bonus and I am grateful for it, I just wanted to see what the different opinions on serving on standby vessels were.

                    Lewis, the post wasn't so much about which job is better, than more about how serving time on standby vessels may affect applications to other types of companies later on in my career as there is a certain stigma attached to standby vessels.

                    Thank you all for your replies, I will just see what happens on Thursday and then I will have some decisions to make if I pass.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Good luck with you orals in the mean time, and hope whatever you decide works out well for you!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If it's a standard employment contract then there should be a notice period, if you are not obliged to take it then it doesn't sound like it is connected to your training and there should therefore be no financial penalty if you leave before the 2 years so long as you give them the correct notice.

                        Have a good read of the contract and see what the get out terms are, you are unlikely to be forced to work for someone for 2 years without any way out. If you get a better offer before you are in a position where you have to make a decision on the conta=ract then take it, if not sign the contract.

                        Good luck either way.
                        Go out, do stuff

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          So come on then, don't keep us waiting....

                          Did you pass?

                          Ian
                          "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.
                          "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

                          "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

                          Comment

                          Previously entered content was automatically saved. Restore or Discard.
                          Auto-Saved
                          x
                          Insert: Thumbnail Small Medium Large Fullsize Remove  
                          x
                          x
                          Working...
                          X