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  • Moving Shoreside

    Hi,

    I'm finding it difficult to find shoreside employment after leaving the Merchant Navy as a 3/O. Looked down all the traditional routs in the sector but have yet to come up with anything.

    ??????The only luck I've had so far is with part time jobs that pay close to the nmw. Skills gained at sea are so difficult to transfer at a junior rank. All team leader and management openings have pointed me back to entry level positions. Struggling to find a way forward. If anyone has been through similar or can point me in the right direction of an agency or employer that takes on ex-officers that'd be great.

    Thanks

  • #2
    As a 3/O you have barely anything to bring to civvy street life sadly. The non-marine jobs with good wages require similar levels of training you did during your cadetship, but in their business.

    So to that end I’d recommend retraining or staying at sea. Can’t you work on workboats instead of going ashore? They pay alright and you sleep ashore everyday.

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    • #3
      Not entirely true that there are no options. True you will struggle to jump in with a management job. If you top up your FD to a BSc it can only help.

      Look into -

      VTS Operator.
      Trainee marine surveyor. (I know someone who has done this)
      Trainee charterer
      Assistant Harbourmaster.

      There are others I can't bring to mind.

      Also, if you decide transition to another industry, even though most employers have no idea what a CoC is, the skills and experience you will have gained in the Merchant Navy are a big plus. You need to sell yourself.

      Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using Tapatalk

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      • #4
        Originally posted by McBoo View Post
        the skills and experience you will have gained in the Merchant Navy are a big plus
        Sadly everyone on over £18k shoreside says they have these kinds of skills too. I’ve seen the CVs of assistant store managers applying to jobs at my place and they look more impressive than any seafarers... but I’m 110% sure seafarers would be better. Gift of the gab.

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        • #5
          Sure, anyone can *say* they have these skills but I doubt all the holders of the CVs mentioned will be able to back their claims up with lived examples in the same way as a Third Mate could.

          At the end of the day, it is about how you sell yourself and demonstrate the skills you have. If your CV looks bad or doesn't read well you've fallen at the first hurdle.

          Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using Tapatalk

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          • #6
            To move shoreside under a seafarering qualification without a chunk of experience will be hard. Best bet would be to use your HND/FD as a stepping stone to another qualification. Either direct top up to degree level on the same course pathway or see if credits from your HND/FD can apply to a different degree but more applicable to shoreside (business/logistics/management)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by McBoo View Post
              Sure, anyone can *say* they have these skills but I doubt all the holders of the CVs mentioned will be able to back their claims up with lived examples in the same way as a Third Mate could.

              At the end of the day, it is about how you sell yourself and demonstrate the skills you have. If your CV looks bad or doesn't read well you've fallen at the first hurdle.

              Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using Tapatalk
              My point is more for non-marine roles where most junior management types would trounce a 3rd officer in experience, assuming they’ve hit the small goals employers want from junior management types. Sadly at sea we don’t deal with things like KPIs, six sigma, 5s, NEBOSH, WAMITAB and the likes; it’s safe to say you probably won’t touch £40k in most land jobs without at least one of the above. I must say if I was employing for the role of duty manager at my place, I’d struggle to see anything a third officer could bring to the table, assuming their experience is as you’d expect with a third officer. It’s a very low rank to consider moving ashore from, and doesn’t have the benefits a fourth engineer or junior ETO would carry ashore.

              OP could always look at things like lorry driving, train driving, emergency services etc. however.

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              • #8
                Top up FD HND, do a Masters in a related area.

                Comment


                • #9
                  You should look into Renewable energy. I decided to drop out of my cadetship didn't sit my Orals but made sure i finished all my academic stuff and got my FD. I recently got a job as an Offshore Coordinator for an offshore wind company. I work shifts and get a very attractive benefits package + holiday allowance on top of that, the money is very good (On par with what I could have got as a third officer at the oil major i did my cadetship with) An added bonus is I am using the stuff I learnt at college / at sea and getting to go home every day!

                  At the company im at an "Offshore Coordinator has a whole host of responsibilities including:
                  Marine & Helicopter Coordination in our windfarms.
                  People tracking of technicians currently working offshore.
                  Emergency response coordination.
                  Operational Control of the wind farm (Basically ensuring a safe system of work is achieved when technicians work on the wind farm)
                  Monitoring power produced by the wind farm and reporting any outages to the relevant authorities (If a wind farm goes down it can have a MAJOR effect on the grid).

                  I really couldn't stress enough how strongly I feel renewables are a huge growing market in the uk, especially for ex-seafarers (Your talents will be very valuable where offshore wind is concerned). I appreciate I am slightly biased because my hometown has seen a huge amount of investment from renewable companies however im sure this growing market is not limited to my hometown!

                  I would like to pick up on the comment that job prospects are limited for deckies, I finished my FD but didn't get my COC. I was not out of work for longer than 3 weeks ( From getting home from my ship!). Admittedly I did go into a job as a ships agent, earning minimum wage (Base salary) with overtime opportunities however I see no end of ships agents jobs which would snap anyone with actual seagoing experience up! If you are worried about a gap in employment this could be a way to fill it while you explore your options / figure out what you want to do. Don't see it as a pay cut, see it as a bonus you are earning SOMETHING while you find the career path you want to take. I am a strong believer in making myself fit into the job spec that I am applying for, even if you don't think you are what the employer is looking for straight away, have a sit down and think about it, the Cadet training plan is an extremely well rounded training course! If you have any questions about the offshore wind industry feel free to hit me up with a PM.

                  My current role is called various things at different companies just look out for: Offshore coordinator, marine controller, Marine & Helicopter coordinator.

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                  • #10
                    Humber ABP are taking OOWs for Pilot training, considered that? Apparently, NATS are very keen on us with the GOC and emergency communications 'experience'. Air Traffic Control can lead into the Billy Big Bucks too...

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                    • #11
                      I looked at ATC before embarking on this career. Can be incredibly stressful I believe although I guess so can being at sea.

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                      • #12
                        I considered it after qualifying, just didn't like the idea of them posting me potentially down south.

                        As I understand it, by the time you've finished training, it's not so much stressful as pressurised? You have to work hard and quick, but if it's being done right you shouldn't be stressed, if you see the distinction?

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