Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

ENG3 permanently unfit

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • ENG3 permanently unfit

    Recently qualified as Deck OOW. Got my first job as 2nd mate working in the west coast of Scotland. Anyway I have a nut allergy and accidentally ofcourse ate a meal with satay sauce in it. Cook was aware of the allergies but was getting myour food plated up as I was on watch during dinner. My fault mainly for not double checking but anyway. Went into anaphylatic shock and had to be airlifted off the ship. Thankful to the crew for doing what they did to keep me alive. However I am now in a difficult situation as I have now been given a permanently unfit for work eng3. Therefore as it stands that's my career over as soon as it's begun. Anyone know where I can go from here?!

  • #2
    Can you not get a restricted medical? 2nd Opinion from a different doc?

    If those options fail, then I'd give the good folks at Spinnaker Recruitment a call, lay the situation of what has happened out to one of the recruitment consultants and see what they can do for you. I'd recommend speaking to a chap called Ollie Mason, very helpful chap who really did go the extra mile for me.

    Failing that, go back to Uni and get a full degree then start applying for graduate programs? I must admit, I've seen some very good graduate programs within the industry lately, particularly around the commercial side.
    I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

    All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

    Comment


    • #3
      First of all Y1ULE I am dreadfully disappointed to hear your news. Secondly I have quite a bit of knowledge of this as my own son is anaphylactic to nuts and had to go through a special medical with the MCA in order to get his ENG with the restriction of both the Company and he must tell the Captain and the Cook of his allergy before, and on, joining a vessel.

      When he went for his first medical he was open and honest with the Doctor. He told the Doctor he had an allergy since it was diagnosed at aged 3 or 4, but had never had a severe reaction. Despite the fact that he carries 4 epipens at all times he has only ever had to take antihistamines for irritations caused by pollen and other irritants. He was only diagnosed with peanut allergy because of a skin prick test in Hospital when he was about 8. The Doctor had to send all of his medical notes to the MCA and they were happy for him to have the ENG with the above restriction once they had discussed it with his sponsoring Company.

      Below is why I think that you will not be able to get a second opinion - sorry GuinnessMan!

      The reason why I believe that you are now stuck with the ruling permanently is from the "ADG16 - Allergies" guidance:

      https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/443995/MCA_Doctors_manual-links_July_rev_1st_proof.pdf


      1. Based on the answers to the above questions, is there a pattern of response which indicates that a rapid life-threatening incident while at sea is reasonably foreseeable? (e.g. established allergy to peanuts that is becoming more frequent and severe)
      Yes – Permanently unfit category 4 Self-treatment of life-threatening reactions using ‘epi-pen’ or other immediate treatments is not acceptable as such devices are intended as an immediate measure in situations where medical care is available and not as definitive treatments remote from care
      No and they have a strongly suspected allergy – Go to 2
      No and they do not have a strongly suspected allergy – consider in relation to pattern or impairment, symptoms or alternative diagnosis


      2. Do they have a pattern of response that is impairing and may lead to incapacity for work but is not life-threatening (e.g. Coeliac disease with gluten – wheat protein – sensitivity; dermatitis attributed to nickel)?
      Yes and exposure to allergen can be avoided by access to suitable diet or by avoidance of exposure to sensitising agent – Restricted category 2
      • list specific items to be avoided
      • consider near coastal restriction if complete avoidance is impracticable (e.g. traces or wheat in processed foods)
      • consider time limitation if regular surveillance needed to confirm lack of worsening in reactions
      • consider restriction of not working as sole expert in a field

      Yes and avoidance of exposure is impossible Permanently unfit category 4
      Yes but effects can be fully controlled by self-medication. If this is by the use of topical treatment (for non-occupational dermatitis) or long term non-steroidal medications that do not have safety critical adverse effects. Case by case assessment – Fit category 1
      No – trivial response or cause of allergy unlikely to be encountered at sea - Fit category 1


      I am sorry to say that my interpretation of that is that because you have now had a severe anaphylactic reaction that required medical intervention and hospitalisation I do not believe you could ever pass a medical now.

      I know this must be devastating for you, as it would be for my son if it happened because he knows it would end his career if he had even one anaphylactic reaction.

      There are limited jobs ashore for deckies, but just off the top of my head: lecturer at a Nautical College, cadet recruiter or cadet liason for a MN Company, Working in a port in operations, retrain and get a degree in Marine Law and go down that route or P&I. Some others will pop other ideas in here soon and will probably tell me which of mine are non starters but eventually something might fire you up.

      There is one glimmer of hope though. Dr Andrew Clark of Adenbrooks Hospital has been running a number of tests for years where they give small amounts of nut protein to children (microgrammes) and then ramp it up until they are eating 5 peanuts a day and so they get rid of the allergy. If you wanted to stay at sea it might be worth finding out if you do do the protocol privately with him and remove the allergy? That way you will pass the ENG1 again? We have tried to get my son onto the programme for years, but he was too old. We are just waiting for the protocol to be approved for general use so he can get on it and get rid of his peanut allergy for good.

      You can find more information on him here http://www.allergycliniclondon.co.uk/allergy-cambridge/

      Good luck.

      Ian
      "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.

      "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

      "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Y1ULE View Post
        Anyone know where I can go from here?!
        Don't give up hope yet Y1ULE! Whilst Hatchorder has a better understanding of your illness via his son, I have very recent experience of getting an unrestricted ENG1 having had a life threatening condition. It took over 12 months battling with the MCA to get it but I got there in the end.

        My advice is to definitely appeal the decision. It is free (bar the cost of getting yourself to the location of your appeal) and will go to an independent medical referee. If you would like to chat about this further please feel free to PM me. Best of luck.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Maso210 View Post
          Don't give up hope yet Y1ULE! Whilst Hatchorder has a better understanding of your illness via his son, I have very recent experience of getting an unrestricted ENG1 having had a life threatening condition. It took over 12 months battling with the MCA to get it but I got there in the end.

          My advice is to definitely appeal the decision. It is free (bar the cost of getting yourself to the location of your appeal) and will go to an independent medical referee. If you would like to chat about this further please feel free to PM me. Best of luck.
          Maso210, can I ask what condition it was and what section of the ADG it relates to? Can it be that the condition has changed because of surgery or something else that caused the condition to change? The reason I ask is because the MCA were very explicit with us - should you suffer an anaphylactic reaction then you will automatically fail an ENG. This is why I mentioned Dr Andrew Clark. If you can follow the protocol, get yourself cleared of the Anaphylaxis then you could have a case to argue with the MCA but until then I cannot believe you can answer anything other than yes to question 1 above....

          Maybe a bit more information of your condition and your appeal and how you won might help?

          Thanks,

          Ian
          "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.

          "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

          "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Ian,

            I don't want to go into detail publicly about my condition but you may well be right in that, sadly, this might be the end of OP's seafaring career. You know far more about this specific condition than I do and I'll admit that my problems were very different but I was once in the same situation whereby the MCA was telling me that my seagoing career was over and it was only the intervention of the extremely helpful doctor who undertook my appeals that I am now deemed fit again.

            My advice is simply to appeal. It may come to nothing but it is definitely worth a shot. An appeal may mean that you get an ENG1 with restrictions (e.g. coastal/categorised waters only) but that might be better than nothing.

            What I did learn from the process was that although the MCA Chief Medical Adviser may say one thing, the view of an independent, specialist Consultant may be enough to tip it in your favour. I might have been lucky in that the doctor who undertook my appeals was very much in my corner and took time to seek advice from the specific Consultant who treated me.

            Don't give up just yet!

            Comment

            Working...
            X