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  • #16
    I think those exemptions are being phased out.
    Former TH cadet with experience of cruise ships, buoy tenders, research ships and oil tankers

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    • #17
      Worth mentioning the MCA have realised the error of their ways on that one and the exemptions no longer exist for people starting now as far as I know.

      The only people who get them are those lucky enough to have done said course within the relatively short time frame the exemptions existed (like 2007-2015 or something?) That may be out by a couple of years but give or take is roughly right I think. Incidentally I am in that group. Don't particularly agree with the exemptions but it is what it is....

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      • #18
        So here is my 2 cents experience wise working with different nationalities I have asked about tickets ;

        Polish - They have a very similar system to the British where you have to do exams for OOW-Mate-Master which include Written exams and Simulator exams. They also have to do a maritime law module for chief mates and masters which is an English Oral exam.

        Italian - Varies depending on where you go in Italy as it is governed at a state level. I know one officer from Genoa in the North who failed his mates and then told me he would go to Naples where the exam is 'much cheaper'. They also cannot sit there Masters exams until they have sailed in the rank of 1st/chief mate for 12 months.

        Croatian - The croatian system is very similar to Italian.

        Norwegian - They do a full University type course I think of 5 years? Then just aquire sea time and reccomendations to progress.

        Lithuanian - Seems similiar to the Polish. Sailed with a young Lithuanian AB who was doing his exams at Fleetwood because there own ticket was 'worthless' yet he said it was just as difficult as British.

        Irish - Near enough same system as Britian but they do larger phase at college then a larger phase at sea - They also have to find there own sponsor.

        Thats what I can remember off the top of my head

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Clanky View Post
          I assume that is based on actual personal experience of the Philippines and Eastern European exam system and not just some racist bollocks that you heard at smoko once?
          I can vouch for that from working with an all-Filipino crew. The Phillipine Islands COC final assessment only involves a multiple choice test, however said test involves about 300-400 questions and is written entirely in English.
          Last edited by All At Sea; 26th March 2016, 09:53 AM. Reason: horrendous grammar

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          • #20
            Originally posted by bobofinga View Post
            .

            Irish - Near enough same system as Britian but they do larger phase at college then a larger phase at sea - They also have to find there own sponsor.

            Thats what I can remember off the top of my head
            A few months ago my ship was berthed in Ringaskiddy right next to an Irish maritime college. Went down to the pub (there was only one) on a run ashore and had a few drinks and a long chat with a some of the Irish cadets down there. From what I can remember they to their academic training in the first two years and then they get their 12 months sea time in one block rather than in alternating phases. At the start of the course they are either self or grant funded and have to find a sponsor to get their sea time in during their second year. This leads to a number of cadets who run up debts of thousands of euros in the first two years only to find that they cannot complete their training for want of a berth to complete their sea time.

            They all agreed that the UK system, while not perfect, was far better...

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