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  • Working in Hot/humid conditions

    Originally posted by leaflet on the dangers of heat illness
    According to the Ship Captain's Medical Guide, the work/rest ratio per hour is calculated by using a "hygrometer".

    Hygrometers are comprised of two thermometers, one wet-bulb and one dry-bulb; located behind a Stevenson Screen near the bridge.

    The readings on the two thermometers can be used to calculate a "composite temperature" which gives indication towards acceptable work levels per hour in the circumstances.

    This "composite temperature" is calculated as:

    ((W x 0.7) + (D x 0.3)) W is Wet-bulb temperature, D is Dry-bulb temperature

    and the composite values are then graded by type of work to be undertaken; Light Work, Moderate Work, Heavy Work .

    Continuous Work in an hour is acceptable for:

    Light Work - 30?C
    Moderate Work - 27?C
    Heavy Work - 25?C

    45 minutes work in an hour is acceptable for:

    Light Work - 30.5?C
    Moderate Work - 28?C
    Heavy Work - 26?C

    30 minutes work in an hour is acceptable for:

    Light Work - 31.5?C
    Moderate Work - 29.5?C
    Heavy Work - 28?C

    15 minutes work in an hour is acceptable for:

    Light Work - 32?C
    Moderate Work - 31?C
    Heavy Work - 30?C

    The rest of the hour should be spent as rest.

    If the temperature is higher than 32?C extreme cation needs to be exercised in allowing work to be carried out due to risk of heat-stroke.

    In an emergency it is recommended that work is undertaken in short spells of 10 minutes with a full cooling off period before entering the hot environment again.

    It is also important to mention that this method does not reflect ambient temperature outside, on deck or in the engine room.
    Now, this is interesting as it doesn't state what Light/Moderate/Heavy work is... but still useful information

    Not all Trade Unionists are left wing, socialists or even ugly

  • #2
    Re: Working in Hot/humid conditions

    what about the engine room ? that always going to be hot
    Maybe I will never be
    All the things that I want to be
    But now is not the time to cry
    Now's the time to find out why

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    • #3
      Re: Working in Hot/humid conditions

      i cant find any info on engine room... *looks to Chiefy*
      Not all Trade Unionists are left wing, socialists or even ugly

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      • #4
        Re: Working in Hot/humid conditions

        Bwahahahaha! Sorry, but if we followed that, nothing would ever get done in the ER between 50N and 50S. This would make shipping a little more expensive and slightly less practical than Concorde as a means of conveying cargo.
        '... English is about as pure as a cribhouse whore. We don't
        just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued other languages
        down alleyways to beat them unconscious and rifle their pockets for
        new vocabulary.' - James Davis Nicoll

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        • #5
          Re: Working in Hot/humid conditions

          I think he's been reading the literature, and taking it too... literally!
          Emeritus Admin & Founding Member

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          • #6
            Re: Working in Hot/humid conditions

            OMFG what? we have to check the temperature so the poor ickle engimaneers dont get sweaty, you'll be wanting clean jobs next

            In this case common sense needs to be applied......

            If it's hot and humid, you work a bit, you hide in the Workshop for a bit, you drink LOADS and LOADS of water....simple rule if you pee 3 times a day now then you should pee at least 3 times/day in hot sweaty weather, therefore fluid intake HAS TO GO UP. Another good indicator if you wee is dark (as in very dark) you aint drunk enough fluid.

            From here on in it's upto personal preference, some people guzzle Gatorade, I take a couple of salt tablets / day I think there has to be a ballance, too much gatorade is bad for you as are too many salt tablets (I know some poeple cannt keep them down). As with everything common sense and moderation apply.

            The Purifier Room is (generally) the hotest spot and most senior engineers will try to get all the "routine" work done in there before entering known hot spots (Red Sea, Singapore Straights etc) however stuff still breaks and needs fixing at which point refer to above and common sense.
            Trust me I'm a Chief.

            Views expressed by me are mine and mine alone.
            Yes I work for the big blue canoe company.
            No I do not report things from here to them as they are quite able to come and read this stuff for themselves.


            Twitter:- @DeeChief

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            • #7
              Re: Working in Hot/humid conditions

              I never really noticed the heat when I was working there, guess growing up in the Middle East was useful for something. Although I was going through a good couple of bottles of water a day.
              I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

              All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

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              • #8
                Re: Working in Hot/humid conditions

                Originally posted by Chiefy
                OMFG what? we have to check the temperature so the poor ickle engimaneers dont get sweaty, you'll be wanting clean jobs next
                That wouldn't be a Deck Officer job now?

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                • #9
                  Re: Working in Hot/humid conditions

                  Aye, the glorified bus drivers wouldnt want to get their uniforms dirty now would they?
                  I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

                  All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Working in Hot/humid conditions

                    I would point out to the clankies (and the noobie deckies who think it's all going to be looking out of a window all day) that we deckies actually have to do quite a lot of scrabbling about in dirty spaces... things like tank and void space inspections and lifeboat inspections tend to get one quite mucky! So less of that lip, and MAN UP the lot of you!!

                    Size4riggerboots

                    Moderator
                    Blog tWitterings Flickr Tumblr Faceache

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                    • #11
                      Re: Working in Hot/humid conditions

                      Originally posted by size4riggerboots
                      I would point out to the clankies (and the noobie deckies who think it's all going to be looking out of a window all day) that we deckies actually have to do quite a lot of scrabbling about in dirty spaces... things like tank and void space inspections and lifeboat inspections tend to get one quite mucky! So less of that lip, and MAN UP the lot of you!!
                      ^^^^^ read it and weep people

                      Bilge Alarm Testing
                      Ballast Tank Inspections
                      Inspecting cargo hold when the bilge alarm goes off before your friends the engineers pump them out
                      Changing Nav ights up the main mast
                      Greasing the lashing gear
                      General deck greasing
                      and the ever popular.....chipping and painting

                      Hmm that was a longer list than the one in my head which just read "what she said"
                      Trust me I'm a Chief.

                      Views expressed by me are mine and mine alone.
                      Yes I work for the big blue canoe company.
                      No I do not report things from here to them as they are quite able to come and read this stuff for themselves.


                      Twitter:- @DeeChief

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Working in Hot/humid conditions

                        Im just winding up our "compatriots" in the deck department....
                        I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

                        All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Working in Hot/humid conditions

                          I read quite a funny book a while back called Ocean Boulevard, about a deck cadet in the late 70s working on cargo ships etc. Seemed to spend a lot of time cleaning out the cargo tanks. I'm glad I'm an ETO cadet.
                          Former TH cadet with experience of cruise ships, buoy tenders, research ships and oil tankers

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                          • #14
                            Re: Working in Hot/humid conditions

                            I'm sure they'll find some dirty jobs for you too!!!

                            Size4riggerboots

                            Moderator
                            Blog tWitterings Flickr Tumblr Faceache

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                            • #15
                              Re: Working in Hot/humid conditions

                              Originally posted by size4riggerboots
                              I'm sure they'll find some dirty jobs for you too!!!
                              A dirty engineering job?

                              is there such a thing?
                              Not all Trade Unionists are left wing, socialists or even ugly

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