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  • Ebola

    You've probably all seen the news about the Ebola outbreak in Africa at the moment.

    So, what do we all think? Is anyone here in the region?
    I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

    All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

  • #2
    Originally posted by GuinnessMan View Post
    You've probably all seen the news about the Ebola outbreak in Africa at the moment.

    So, what do we all think? Is anyone here in the region?
    Thankfully my cadet is not. I was thinking about this yesterday, and a huge concern is that it's in Africa where healthcare is poor. If it spreads to countries that are fleeing fighting etc to refugee camps or as asylum seekers the effects are catastrophic. Stowaways etc doesn't bear thinking about.
    Just compare it to swine flu, which was really a non event, but described as the next big killer virus, my friend owns a funeral directors she spent a lot of time with the authorities on where bodies would be stored etc.

    My other half caught it in Ireland, took two flights home and a train, he felt fine for a few days, got a fever not bad but we had to call the Dr out according to the swine flu info, he arrived gowned up, gloves mask etc.
    Despite that our children could continue going to school. Needless to say we all got it, our youngest had a temperature but not the required level, nope didn't want to see him, even though hubby still had it, an hour later, it was higher they did want to see him, we were all then tested and my eldest had it and felt fine as did I.
    We were then confined to our home, but only after having infected a school and my workplace.
    These were the UK guidelines that were being followed. It did not turn out to be anything other than a cold with a high temp, for us at least.
    So if that is the level of control to spread a potential killer virus as swine flu was potentially at that time , it was quite contagious. I wonder how third world countries will manage it.
    If it spreads to highly populated countries it doesn't bear thinking about, the only upside is the worlds population will have a massive decrease.

    I certainly hope that if Ebola spreads whatever they put in place is a whole lot better than the swine flu precautions.

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    • #3
      I think I read Ebola kills upto 90% of infected people.

      Now that is a worry.
      Former TH cadet with experience of cruise ships, buoy tenders, research ships and oil tankers

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      • #4
        Not worried unless it becomes airborne. At the moment it's only transmitted via bodily fluids I believe.

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        • #5
          Apparently its another swine-flu scenario mate.
          There is definitely an outbreak and people are dying, however the standard fatality rate is 33% from the typical strain of Ebola. The press tend to exaggerate the situation a great deal & according to a site I've just had read through its happening in remote villages/towns where healthcare & hygiene isn't great to put it bluntly and to contract it you must have direct contact with the bodily fluids of an infected person.

          http://online.wsj.com/articles/ian-l...-be-1407098183
          uk.linkedin.com/in/bjwmcgrath

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          • #6
            Yes as EH75 says, it requires direct contact with bodily guilds and actually very difficult to transmit in the west, much more likely to transmit in Africa. Also, the high death rate of those that contract it actually makes it less endemic.

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            • #7
              WHO info, http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs103/en/ deaths are higher than 33% though. Contact with bodily fluids includes sweat.
              What is worrying is that in the early days it can look like many other illnesses bur it doesn't appear to be as infectious at that point.
              YM good point if lots die less are able to spread it.
              This appears to be the biggest outbreak in a long time. Guess it's a wait and see and hope they can control it situation.

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              • #8
                Slightly concerned that i spent saturday night drinking with the ugandan rugby team.

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                • #9
                  are you dead yet? In which case you're fine....remember you need to have swapped "fluids" of some sort.........assuming you didint I wouldnt worry overly much
                  Trust me I'm a Chief.

                  Views expressed by me are mine and mine alone.
                  Yes I work for the big blue canoe company.
                  No I do not report things from here to them as they are quite able to come and read this stuff for themselves.


                  Twitter:- @DeeChief

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                  • #10
                    Also Uganda is East Coast, which I believe is far from the main outbreaks in the west.

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                    • #11
                      How does this affect seafarers whose ships are visiting West African Ports? No doubt a variety of locals will want to come on board to be met ba a cadet or AB on gangway duty. I take it there are policies for dealing with this situation as it is a while since I was at sea. How good is the information on board for dealing with this and a possible infected seafarer? If you are at sea for a couple of weeks, someone is sick the end result is do you bag them and slip them over the side.....

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                      • #12
                        URGENT COMMUNICATION ON THE RISK OF THE EBOLA VIRUS

                        ITF, IMEC and ICS have been in communication regarding the serious nature of the outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa. As such, we have agreed that strong recommendations should be made to our members with vessels calling into countries which have been impacted by the virus. Members are asked to consider these recommendations internally and pass such on to their vessels as a matter of some urgency:

                        1. The Master should ensure that the crew are aware of the risks, how the virus can be spread and how to reduce the risk.

                        2. The ISPS requirements on ensuring that unauthorised personnel do not board the vessel should be strictly enforced throughout the duration of the vessel being in port.

                        3. The Master should give careful consideration to granting any shore leave whilst in impacted ports.


                        4. The shipowner/operator should avoid making crew changes in the ports of an affected country.

                        5. After departure the crew should be aware of the symptoms and report any occurring symptoms immediately to the person in charge of medical care.

                        The following information, produced by the World Health Organisation, may assist in the education of on-board personnel:

                        Ebola is introduced into the human population through close contact with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected animals. In Africa, infection has been documented through the handling of infected chimpanzees, gorillas, fruit bats, monkeys, forest antelope and porcupines found ill or dead or in the rainforest.

                        Ebola then spreads in the community through human-to-human transmission, with infection resulting from direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes) with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected people, and indirect contact with environments contaminated with such fluids. Burial ceremonies in which mourners have direct contact with the body of the deceased person can also play a role in the transmission of Ebola. Men who have recovered from the disease can still transmit the virus through their semen for up to 7 weeks after recovery from illness.

                        Ebola is not spread through the air.

                        Health-care workers have frequently been infected while treating patients with suspected or confirmed EVD. This has occurred through close contact with patients when infection control precautions are not strictly practiced.

                        Among workers in contact with monkeys or pigs infected with Reston ebolavirus, several infections have been documented in people who were clinically asymptomatic. Thus, RESTV appears less capable of causing disease in humans than other Ebola species.


                        However, the only available evidence available comes from healthy adult males. It would be premature to extrapolate the health effects of the virus to all population groups, such as immuno-compromised persons, persons with underlying medical conditions, pregnant women and children. More studies of RESTV are needed before definitive conclusions can be drawn about the pathogenicity and virulence of this virus in humans.


                        Signs and symptoms


                        EVD is a severe acute viral illness often characterized by the sudden onset of fever, intense weakness, muscle pain, headache and sore throat. This is followed by vomiting, diarrhoea, rash, impaired kidney and liver function, and in some cases, both internal and external bleeding. Laboratory findings include low white blood cell and platelet counts and elevated liver enzymes.


                        People are infectious as long as their blood and secretions contain the virus. Ebola virus was isolated from semen 61 days after onset of illness in a man who was infected in a laboratory.


                        The incubation period, that is the time interval from infection with the virus to onset of symptoms, is 2 to 21 days.


                        Further information on the virus may be found at the following link:


                        http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs103/en/

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                        • #13
                          Good advice on Ebola for seafarers can be found at: http://gcaptain.com/shipmate-gets-ebola/

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                          • #14
                            I'm in West Africa at the moment, we crew changed in Cameroon (next to Nigeria which has reported Ebola cases) and are working in Equatorial Guinea. There is more concern about a recent outbreak of polio in this area at the moment. At this point in time my company is trying to play down the Ebola risk. My main concern is how difficult it might become to pay off in west Africa if they start closing borders. Europe might start making travel to and from work more difficult. I can imagine health screening might become mandatory for people entering eu countries. I know that some of the crew are concerned about how easily Ebola might be spread amongst anyone travelling on the same aircraft as a Ebola carrier. Meanwhile we will just get on with our jobs I guess.
                            They told me I was gullible and I believed them.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Frenchy View Post
                              I'm in West Africa at the moment, we crew changed in Cameroon (next to Nigeria which has reported Ebola cases) and are working in Equatorial Guinea. There is more concern about a recent outbreak of polio in this area at the moment. At this point in time my company is trying to play down the Ebola risk. My main concern is how difficult it might become to pay off in west Africa if they start closing borders. Europe might start making travel to and from work more difficult. I can imagine health screening might become mandatory for people entering eu countries. I know that some of the crew are concerned about how easily Ebola might be spread amongst anyone travelling on the same aircraft as a Ebola carrier. Meanwhile we will just get on with our jobs I guess.
                              Ebola has an incubation period of 21 days, health screening for people entering EU countries won't stop it coming into EU countries, people that appear healthy could very well be infected. People with Ebola are apparently quite healthy looking until a couple of days before they die, when they start bleeding out of their skin.

                              There should already be a ban on flights entering Europe from Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and possibly Nigeria. That would be the best way to slow down the spread, but some PC idiots are probably preventing this from happening, they won't be so PC if they catch Ebola and are bleeding our of their skin and every orifice.

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