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  • Fatigue

    I was sent this might be of interest to you.
    http://www.seafarersfatigue.com

  • #2
    So accurate, very well produced.

    6on/off needs to be banned, Safe Manning Documents should require an annual inspection to review the operation of the vessel and its requirements.
    The EU needs to mandate that ships operating solely or primarily in EU waters are EU registered (something along similar lines to the Jones Act in the USA) and then bring working and employment conditions in line with those ashore.

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    • #3
      A very interesting film. This should be watched by the training companies and shown during cadet training at colleges. As they say in the film, if everyone fudges their hours of work then how can they try and prove that not enough rest time causes accidents, as on paper rest times are being upheld.
      Other sectors, such as aviation, train and lorry driving have their regulations so why not shipping!

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      • #4
        That was a good video, cheers for posting. This is something that really needs to be acted but would have to be done by the IMO and enforced across all flags otherwise (as was mentioned in the video) companies will just flag out.

        Speaking of watch keeping patterns, does anyone know why no-one operates an 8 on 16 off system (as far as I know)? I have heard of 6 on 6 off, 12 on 12 off and obviously we all know 4 on 8 off but to me an 8 on 16 off system would enable people to get a really good sleep if they want and give them time to complete out of watch duties. Can't really see any downsides apart from they might say people could loose concentration spending 8 hours straight on the bridge but I would say lack of proper rest then doing a 4 hour watch is even more dangerous. Thoughts?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by EH75 View Post
          That was a good video, cheers for posting. This is something that really needs to be acted but would have to be done by the IMO and enforced across all flags otherwise (as was mentioned in the video) companies will just flag out.

          Speaking of watch keeping patterns, does anyone know why no-one operates an 8 on 16 off system (as far as I know)? I have heard of 6 on 6 off, 12 on 12 off and obviously we all know 4 on 8 off but to me an 8 on 16 off system would enable people to get a really good sleep if they want and give them time to complete out of watch duties. Can't really see any downsides apart from they might say people could loose concentration spending 8 hours straight on the bridge but I would say lack of proper rest then doing a 4 hour watch is even more dangerous. Thoughts?
          I think the reason are it's just the working hours for the officers ! I mean the 3/0 finishes his watch at 12 and has time to get off his check and work done and being the least experienced officer only works during daylight hours when the captain is available. the chief finishes work at 8 when all the deck crew wake up so he can plan his day with them and can make sure they are doing it all. I think the 4on 8 off works well just as it ties in with all the crew workings and stuff

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jacloc View Post
            A very interesting film. This should be watched by the training companies and shown during cadet training at colleges. As they say in the film, if everyone fudges their hours of work then how can they try and prove that not enough rest time causes accidents, as on paper rest times are being upheld.
            Other sectors, such as aviation, train and lorry driving have their regulations so why not shipping!
            We do have regulations for HoR and they are checked up on (during audits and by PSC), but there is a major difference between the marine industry and the aviation, train and lorry drivers. They're hours can be monitored and verified independently (e.g. Tachographs), it is not reliant upon them entering their own hours.

            It's hard to explain, because things vary by company, but we have our guys plan their jobs with HoR in mind. Say there is a big job that needs to be done then they would adjust their watch and working times in advance to make sure that at least one person could come back down the ER to maintain the watch whilst the others rested after the big job and then things would go back to normal over a day or two. Our guys do this and they tend to do it quite well, the only time it goes wrong is when there is a big unexpected failure of something important (it happens) where more folks are needed. So long as the reasons for it are valid, documented and everyone's had their rest afterwards then no problems. If it's just down to general operations, then there is a problem that needs to be looked at. As an example, if you have a ship that is making regular port calls (i.e. within 12 hours of each other) on a routine basis, then it is good practice to have an extra deckie on board (3/O usually) but like I said, this varies massively by company so not all will do this.

            When it comes to verification, we tend to look at two things. The HoR sheet and the log books, which we (and PSC and your ship's RO) will compare to see if they match up....
            I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

            All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

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