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A reminder about the dangers of mooring ropes

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  • A reminder about the dangers of mooring ropes

    As the title says, another reminder about the dangers of mooring / unmooring a ship!

    Originally posted by http://www.cruiselawnews.com/2013/03/articles/maritime-death/death-on-ncls-norwegian-jade/
    According to a news account in Greece, a 25 year old Filipino crew member aboard the Norwegian Jade died when the cruise ship was in Katakolo, Greece.

    In addition to the skimpy information contained in the newspaper, we learned that the incident occurred early this morning when cruise passengers were preparing to disembark for sightseeing ashore (including visiting the ruins of Olympia).

    A mooring line snapped while the crew member was standing on a mooring deck platform (at the level of deck 7). The crew member was violently struck by the recoiling rope. He was knocked overboard and into the water at the port. According to the news account, divers took several hours to retrieve the dead man's body in the murky water.

    ....
    http://www.cruiselawnews.com/2013/03...orwegian-jade/
    Last edited by alistairuk; 9th March 2013, 06:16 PM. Reason: Add the URL
    “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

    – Mark Twain
    myBlog | @alistairuk | flickr | youtube Views and opinions expressed are those of myself and not representative of any employer or other associated party.

  • #2
    Snap back zone?
    Former TH cadet with experience of cruise ships, buoy tenders, research ships and oil tankers

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    • #3
      Complacency maybe, urge to get moored up quickly leading to crew members taking short cuts, unaware of the snap back zones, unaware of the snap back zones when running lines around an old man, poor training, poor supervision, bad communication. Take your pick. The linked news piece says the seaman wasn't even wearing a hard hat, so sounds like a poor safety culture on board. But who knows? All speculation.
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      • #4
        Just to play devil's advocate, are hard hats really all that useful on the mooring deck? Apart from protecting from minor bumps, their effectiveness is perhaps a bit overstated.
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        Hello! I'm Chris. I'm away a lot so I'm sorry if it takes me a while to reply to messages, but I promise I'll get back to everyone. If it's urgent, please email me directly at christopher.doyle@officercadet.com.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by CharlieDelta View Post
          Just to play devil's advocate, are hard hats really all that useful on the mooring deck? Apart from protecting from minor bumps, their effectiveness is perhaps a bit overstated.
          I suppose it's just good routine to wear one. Although not directly related to mooring its just good practice to wear a helmet every time you go on deck. Or, at least, that's what my last company said. But they also made us wear high vis vests for mooring too!

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          • #6
            I don't think a hard hat would of made a bit of difference. I doubt a bit of formed plastic could do much to stop a snapped line.
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            • #7
              As Chris says, it's good routine practice. Also, a hard hat might not save you from a mooring line, but when heaving lines are flying about, I've been very glad of my hard hat!

              Size4riggerboots

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              • #8
                Originally posted by tlloyd1983 View Post
                I don't think a hard hat would of made a bit of difference. I doubt a bit of formed plastic could do much to stop a snapped line.
                True, but if the line knocks you over - the helmet could be the difference between your brains being on the deck or a bruise on your head!

                Although in the case of this accident, it probably wouldn't of made a difference as the force of the line knocked them overboard.
                “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

                – Mark Twain
                myBlog | @alistairuk | flickr | youtube Views and opinions expressed are those of myself and not representative of any employer or other associated party.

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                • #9
                  I'm not saying don't wear a hard hat! Was just saying in this instance, it sounds like he was stood in the section were you can watch the lines going down, and it wouldn't of changed the outcome. Of course kids, always wear your PPE!
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                  • #10
                    Stating the obvious again, but what a massive difference between safety theory and practice. Im willing to bet they have a length SMS document too
                    Former TH cadet with experience of cruise ships, buoy tenders, research ships and oil tankers

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by chris View Post
                      Im willing to bet they have a length SMS document too
                      What has the length of the SMS got to do with anything? Our SMS is huge, but that's because it has to cover all the different types of vessels we have in our management as we don't just run Tankers. I've always looked at the SMS and the checklists within it as being like cheat sheats, there as a reminder to me to make sure I'm doing things safely and haven't missed anything.
                      I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

                      All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by GuinnessMan View Post
                        What has the length of the SMS got to do with anything? Our SMS is huge, but that's because it has to cover all the different types of vessels we have in our management as we don't just run Tankers. I've always looked at the SMS and the checklists within it as being like cheat sheats, there as a reminder to me to make sure I'm doing things safely and haven't missed anything.
                        Some companies have huge SMS's requiring **** loads of paperwork from the crew, which results in the crew just doing the paperwork to say they did it all safely without really doing what they said they did. Not saying this is the case in this incident, but it happens.

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