Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Are container ships getting too big? (BBC news)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Are container ships getting too big? (BBC news)

    Makes for a very interesting read

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21432226

  • #2
    This made me a little confused: ''Bearing in mind that the carbon footprint of international shipping is roughly equivalent to that of aviation - some 2.7% of the world's man-made CO2 emissions in the year 2000, according to the International Maritime Organization - the prospect of these leviathans carving up the oceans in ever greater numbers is likely to be a source of concern for green consumers.''
    Now correct if I'm wrong but I'm sure that something around 90% of world trade moves by ship...so the fact it produces the same CO2 as aviation is in fact very good and so the fact the ships are getting more efficient at carrying more cargo is a good thing!? I disliked the way it was written to portray shipping as some giant dirty world destroying business...I guess in many ways its the opposite.

    All views are my own and not that of my employer/training company.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by PatrickW View Post
      This made me a little confused: ''Bearing in mind that the carbon footprint of international shipping is roughly equivalent to that of aviation - some 2.7% of the world's man-made CO2 emissions in the year 2000, according to the International Maritime Organization - the prospect of these leviathans carving up the oceans in ever greater numbers is likely to be a source of concern for green consumers.''
      Now correct if I'm wrong but I'm sure that something around 90% of world trade moves by ship...so the fact it produces the same CO2 as aviation is in fact very good and so the fact the ships are getting more efficient at carrying more cargo is a good thing!? I disliked the way it was written to portray shipping as some giant dirty world destroying business...I guess in many ways its the opposite.

      I thought the same. Also, the idea is that you need fewer bigger ships, and will overall be more efficient per tonne carried. I wasn't exactly convinced by the argument that two smaller full ships will be more efficient. You can't get round the fact that more stuff comes here from the east than the other way around, so any ship is going to have empty spaces on the way back, regardless of size. Unless I've missed some crucial point?

      Comment


      • #4
        Problem with these mega container ships, is their drafts are too large for most container ports. I don't even think there is a container port in the whole of the USA which can accept them. So you're getting these giants coming to hub ports, like Singapore, Rotterdam, etc. and then they are usually put on feeder ships to smaller ports.
        Linkedin

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by tlloyd1983 View Post
          Problem with these mega container ships, is their drafts are too large for most container ports. I don't even think there is a container port in the whole of the USA which can accept them. So you're getting these giants coming to hub ports, like Singapore, Rotterdam, etc. and then they are usually put on feeder ships to smaller ports.
          Is that necessarily a problem? Obviously until America gets a port big enough it might be for them, but centralisation isn't necessarily a bad thing. If we didn't have hub ports in Singapore then it would take forever for the container ships to collect their cargo and probably result in more inefficient routeing, surely?

          Comment


          • #6
            Increased marine traffic around ports is never good. Not for the environment, not for the poor mariner who has to navigate through the mess. Wait until you see Singapore Strait, especially near the entrances to Keppel, and near Pasir Panjang + Tanjung Pelepas. I've been on a 366m Container ship, trust me, those things aren't the most nimble of ships when it comes to evasive action.
            Linkedin

            Comment


            • #7
              I forgot to also mention, whilst the ship size is getting larger, the crew sizes are staying the same. So compared to your usual 300m container ship, you've got an extra 98m for the same size crew to maintain, and it's daunting. It's hard to truly appreciate the size of these beasts until you're up close next to one, they truly are massive.
              Linkedin

              Comment


              • #8
                Good point, I hadn't thought of the local environmental impact on the water, still learning I can't wait to see all of these places, even if I **** my pants when I see how many things we're on a collision course with (from the deck where I'll be chipping and painting I expect)

                Comment


                • #9
                  You shouldn't be painting and chipping too much, I only spent my first month doing that (and other deck work jobs). I hear about cadets doing it in their final sea phase, and it's just bull****. Should be up on the bridge getting as much experience as possible, and your day work shouldn't consist of doing what an O/S should do, it should be with the 3/O doing FFE and LSA maintenance, with the 2/O doing passage planning and safety inspections, or with the Mate, getting dirty in ballast tanks, inspecting the ship structure, doing safety rounds.

                  You will of course be given random boring deck work jobs some times, usually when there isn't anything important going on, and you should always do those jobs with a smile. But it shouldn't be the only thing you are doing, you're there to learn how to be an officer, not how to be an OS.
                  Linkedin

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Usual leftist crap from a poorly informed BBC journalist trying to make a deadline: 'Anything that burns fuel is bad, we should all stay at home and eat twigs'
                    "Crazy like wild wolves threatened by fire, send them all to the bottom of the sea."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ducki52 View Post
                      we should all stay at home and eat twigs'
                      Lots of fibre...
                      I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

                      All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Duki52 - I didn't dare say it...thank you good sir!
                        All views are my own and not that of my employer/training company.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Whilst i disagree about kost of the things in that article, I do agree that the vessels are getting to big. I'm not sure if its been posted on here or if anyone has seen it, but the Emma maersk recently 'sprung a leak' in the Suez canal very nearly blocking the Suez. Now I understand that any size ship running aground in the Suez is going to be problem but a vessel like Emma or the new Triple E's would be an international disaster for shipping and various economies. Also, what if one of the triple E's was lost at sea? Does anybody know what the insurance cost of just one 40ft reefer with full of 'Haggen Dazs' ice cream costs?? its a bloody lot!

                          i think people look at companies like maersk and believe they could cope with the financial impact of the loss of a vessel like that but i also think that most people are grossly misinformed about the financial capabilities of these companies, the 'propaganda' machines do wonders for the companies. me and my chief officer agreed that the work load on these vessel must be MASSIVE! imagine checking lashings on the Triple E, washing down decks, as someone said about, the crew compliments aren't changing and they certainly won't be giving extra time before leaving ports or given any exceptions.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yeah someone told me that the safe manning certificate for the new ship would allow them to be run with about 13 or 14 crew? Not sure if that's true or not and I doubt they would actually run them with those crewing levels.

                            Don't fancy checking reefers and lashings on a ship that size, let alone trying to fight a fire!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Most of the Maersk Fleet have Safe Manning certs for 13 or 14 people......this is where the issues arise, there is a huge difference between Safe and Operational manning needs.

                              As for the reefer check I dont think they are getting that many reefer slots, I heard of about 7-800, which is no more than several other classes and a lot less than 1600 the L class can carry however not actually seen anything in writting......might go have a rummage round he 'net
                              Trust me I'm a Chief.

                              Views expressed by me are mine and mine alone.
                              Yes I work for the big blue canoe company.
                              No I do not report things from here to them as they are quite able to come and read this stuff for themselves.


                              Twitter:- @DeeChief

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X