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Cadetships for an older bloke?!

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  • #16
    Originally posted by georgeGheal View Post

    A pre cadetship is a level 3 course that aims to build the maths and other related skills. They are normally a lot of school leaver on them. However, I know in Fleetwood for cadet on the HNC/HND route it is the same level 3 delivered to phase 1 cadet and pre-cadetship students.
    Thank you. I will use this topic to share my story : )

    After primary school, I finished Maritime Highschool and I studied Nautical Engineering ( in EU country, not Poland, not UK, hehehe) , but I failed because of Maths.
    My knowledge of maths is completly LOW. I had Maths 8 years in primary school, plus 4 years of secondary school - 12 years and I know only BASIC.
    I had Physics in highschool - but I remember just formulas, general knowledge (that everyone knows).

    When I realised that I'm failing - I decided to move abroad on my own. I worked in hospitality and relocated a lot, I don't have partner, soo I can easly move anywhere and I have that kind of "adventurer" personality.
    I'm 26 years old girl.
    My grades from highschool are mostly C. Soo I can't use that as a "look at me, I'm great highschool leaver" - because - I was average.

    I live in UK and planning stay, because I like it, I found myself happy here
    I have doubt what to do.

    1. Can I apply for Deckhand position if I have only Basic STCW -and gain experience and use that as a "entry requirement" for Cadetship program (Deck officer) or is it helpfull somehow ??
    ---- Apply for Deckhand position - work on the sea, then enroll on Officer of the Watch course?
    2. Should I focus on maths and do Higher Exam (or GSCE), focus on pre-learning - then apply for 3 years- Cadetship program (starting in August , September) ?

    What do you think about this
    : https://www.cityofglasgowcollege.ac....l-5-2020-01-12
    and this: https://www.lews.uhi.ac.uk/courses/n...avy-cadetship/

    I'm interested to work on wind farms, ferry, cruisers or research vessel.

    Sorry, maybe I should open topic for my "case" hehe. As system is different here, I'm not sure wich path should I take.
    I'm just trying to sort all this informations in my head and I need your honest opinion and help.
    Thank you

    Comment


    • #17
      Purplerain If your high school grades are mostly C then you should be eligible to enter a cadetship in the UK. I would say you should contact Clyde Marine or SSTG and talk to them by email or on the phone to ask your options, it may just be a case of converting your high school certificates to UK equivalents (there are organisations that do this for you, it's quite easy) and then apply as anyone else would.

      I don't think you'll have a problem getting offers from shipping companies here as you tick the boxes, if your grades are too low and SSTG/Clyde Marine advise you of this then I think you should study a "pre-cadetship" as others have mentioned. I think you'll be a strong candidate considering you studied Nautical Engineering, as even though you failed you just have to say you wish to study again in a better environment where you can learn practical and theory and then you will be confident you can pass.

      https://www.stc.ac.uk/marine-school/.../pre-cadetship

      Companies matching your interests are SSTG who can offer P&O Ferries as a sponsor and Carnival Cruises (currently hiring cadets for September 2020).

      https://www.jobtrain.co.uk/carnival/...spx?jobid=6026

      "Before you apply please make sure you hold the following:
      • GCSE (grades 4-9) or Scottish Standard level (1-2) or the equivalent in English, Maths, Physics or Combined Science and at least one other subject
      • Candidates must be UK or EEA citizens and be a resident in the UK for at least one year immediately prior to application and have the right to live and work in the UK without restrictions"

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by agibbs98 View Post
        Purplerain If your high school grades are mostly C then you should be eligible to enter a cadetship in the UK. I would say you should contact Clyde Marine or SSTG and talk to them by email or on the phone to ask your options, it may just be a case of converting your high school certificates to UK equivalents (there are organisations that do this for you, it's quite easy) and then apply as anyone else would.

        I don't think you'll have a problem getting offers from shipping companies here as you tick the boxes, if your grades are too low and SSTG/Clyde Marine advise you of this then I think you should study a "pre-cadetship" as others have mentioned. I think you'll be a strong candidate considering you studied Nautical Engineering, as even though you failed you just have to say you wish to study again in a better environment where you can learn practical and theory and then you will be confident you can pass.

        https://www.stc.ac.uk/marine-school/.../pre-cadetship

        Companies matching your interests are SSTG who can offer P&O Ferries as a sponsor and Carnival Cruises (currently hiring cadets for September 2020).

        https://www.jobtrain.co.uk/carnival/...spx?jobid=6026

        "Before you apply please make sure you hold the following:
        • GCSE (grades 4-9) or Scottish Standard level (1-2) or the equivalent in English, Maths, Physics or Combined Science and at least one other subject
        • Candidates must be UK or EEA citizens and be a resident in the UK for at least one year immediately prior to application and have the right to live and work in the UK without restrictions"
        Thank you, you are supportative!
        I will convert high school certificates.
        I will get in touch with them.

        Thank you very much for info about Carnival Cruises
        Cadetships starting in September are better option for me, I will have enought time to prepare myself.




        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by agibbs98 View Post
          Purplerain If your high school grades are mostly C then you should be eligible to enter a cadetship in the UK. I would say you should contact Clyde Marine or SSTG and talk to them by email or on the phone to ask your options, it may just be a case of converting your high school certificates to UK equivalents (there are organisations that do this for you, it's quite easy) and then apply as anyone else would.

          I don't think you'll have a problem getting offers from shipping companies here as you tick the boxes, if your grades are too low and SSTG/Clyde Marine advise you of this then I think you should study a "pre-cadetship" as others have mentioned. I think you'll be a strong candidate considering you studied Nautical Engineering, as even though you failed you just have to say you wish to study again in a better environment where you can learn practical and theory and then you will be confident you can pass.

          https://www.stc.ac.uk/marine-school/.../pre-cadetship

          Companies matching your interests are SSTG who can offer P&O Ferries as a sponsor and Carnival Cruises (currently hiring cadets for September 2020).

          https://www.jobtrain.co.uk/carnival/...spx?jobid=6026

          "Before you apply please make sure you hold the following:
          • GCSE (grades 4-9) or Scottish Standard level (1-2) or the equivalent in English, Maths, Physics or Combined Science and at least one other subject
          • Candidates must be UK or EEA citizens and be a resident in the UK for at least one year immediately prior to application and have the right to live and work in the UK without restrictions"
          this thread conttains some good information on not having UK qualification.
          https://www.officercadet.com/forum/c...is-first/page2

          Comment


          • #20
            Thank you

            I'm planning practice math at home. I'm afraid of maths, but I believe that I can pass exams if I practice a lot.
            I ordered book with maritime terminology too.
            I have 5 years gap.

            English is my second language, I speak and read very well, but I would like to prepare myself with learning materials, and start to read and memorise terminology.
            I will feel more secure in myself.

            Wich books are important and always used?
            List of all books?

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Purplerain View Post
              Thank you

              I'm planning practice math at home. I'm afraid of maths, but I believe that I can pass exams if I practice a lot.
              I ordered book with maritime terminology too.
              I have 5 years gap.

              English is my second language, I speak and read very well, but I would like to prepare myself with learning materials, and start to read and memorise terminology.
              I will feel more secure in myself.

              Wich books are important and always used?
              List of all books?
              Honestly, everything I've needed to get through my cadetship has been provided via the college's library or the course notes. Stuff like basic terminology you can find online - I'd focus on maths, really, and even then, if you're not up to scratch there's usually a focussed mathmatics course provided as part of phase one. I'm terrible at maths but it got me through. If you want to get ahead of the pack I'd be tempted to download MSN1781 and start learning your COLREGS - A Seamans Guide To The Rules Of The Road is a good buy too if you can spare a tenner or so, I really found the excercises in there helpful.

              There's a lot of websites out there posting lists of TEN BOOKS YOU MUST HAVE etc etc but honestly, not many people will get the most out of them until they've had some training and sea time so I don't really know how much help they'd be now.
              27//Officer Cadet//Phase Three//Warsash

              My officer cadet blog - SeasboundBySummer.Tumblr.com

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Purplerain View Post
                Thank you

                I'm planning practice math at home. I'm afraid of maths, but I believe that I can pass exams if I practice a lot.
                I ordered book with maritime terminology too.
                I have 5 years gap.

                English is my second language, I speak and read very well, but I would like to prepare myself with learning materials, and start to read and memorise terminology.
                I will feel more secure in myself.

                Wich books are important and always used?
                List of all books?
                The Pre-Cadetship is a fantastic way to build up your maths skills. And it is very good at doing just that! You'll have around 6 or 12 months, depending on where you do it, to complete the course. But in that time you will do lots and lots and lots of maths. Starting from basic fractions, right up to the starts of calculus. Put it this way, I SUCKED really bad at maths, since I left school over a decade ago with crappy maths grades. And I mean crap. I got essentially the lowest grade possible, apart from a fail. So I went from that to doing Calculus. If I can do it, then honestly most people can if they put the work in!

                This means that you won't be under pressure from the maths side during your actual Cadetship, and you'll be concentrating in building up your maths skills. Some of them also spilt between Deckie and Engineering subjects that you would study on your cadetship first phase anyway. So you get a taste of which path you would like to take too. Although, the Engineering side for me had a bit trickier maths in my opinion; you don't do calculus at all in Deckie subjects, and I did find Thermodynamics and Statics a bit hard. But it wasn't total rocket science, and it is achievable if you really want to become an Engineer. Deckie maths is more Trigonometry , Re-Arranging Formulas (easy when you know how, like a lot of maths, and it blows your mind if you had never even heard of it like me....), Interpolation and plugging in numbers into formulas.

                So yeah, if you do the Pre-Cadetship then you won't be worrying about the maths anymore, I can assure you. Yes, you'll take 4 years to get started in this career, instead of 3, but it is a great foundation if you think you might need it.

                And by the way, the Pre-Cadetship tends to be a big plus on the old CV when you are emailing companies for a sponsorship too.

                Best of luck!

                Comment


                • #23
                  SeaboundBySunrise and Riker
                  Thank you for informations!!! I

                  I know only basic maths from primary school, basic!
                  I need start from scratch! Same like you Riker. I will follow advices and enroll into pre-cadetship. I would like to work as a Deckie.


                  I studied Nautical engineering in my home town (not in UK) and I failed because of maths and life circumstances (money, family loss, etc.) But now I'm older, stronger and more mature .
                  This is syllablus, we had maths on the first year. I'm just interested to know - what exactly from list below I really need learn for navigation - and what I can expect here in UK.
                  Sorry for bothering with lot of questions .


                  Maths 1, autumn: Sets, Real and complex numbers, Elementary functions, Continuity and boundary values ??of functions, Infinite arrays and series, Differential calculus, Elements of linear algebra (Matrices, Systems of linear equations, Vector algebra, Analytical geometry in space).
                  1. Know the basic concepts of set theory; 2. Solve tasks within sets of real and complex numbers; 3. Define and describe elements of linear algebra (interpret solutions of systems of linear equations and matrices, vector algebras and analytical geometries); 4. Test the continuity and calculate the limit values ??of the functions; 5. Analyze the convergence of strings and rows; 6. Apply differential calculus to the testing of elemenets of real functions; 7. Describe the elements of real elementary functions.

                  Maths 2, spring: Function and indefinite integrals. Integration methods. Newton - Leibniz formula. Incorrect integrals. Application of a certain integral. Functions of two or more variables. First order differential equations. Second-order differential equations.
                  1. Define a function and calculate an indefinite integral; 2. Interpret integration methods and apply the Newton - Leibniz formula in solving certain integrals; 3. Recognize and solve incorrect integrals; 4. Apply certain integrals in the calculation of the surfaces, lengths of arches, circumference and surfaces of rotating bodies; 5. Analyze and solve problems from the functions of two or more variables; 6. Interpret the solution of the first and second order differential equations and explain the meaning of them.

                  Thank you for all helpfull advices, I feel more coenfident now.

                  Still I'm thinking about myself that I'm crazy, as I failed in home town - how I will manage here?
                  But I moved here for better future and for self improvement and I think because I'm not 19 anymore, I'm 26, I can achieve this.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Sorry for bothering xD

                    What do you think about this
                    : https://www.cityofglasgowcollege.ac....l-5-2020-01-12
                    and this: https://www.lews.uhi.ac.uk/courses/n...avy-cadetship/

                    I'm in Scotland soo I'm planning enroll in Scotland.

                    Comment

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