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Maersk to halt cadet intake from UK and South Africa

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  • Maersk to halt cadet intake from UK and South Africa

    This was news the other day:

    https://www.nautilusint.org/en/news-...-the-industry/

    A kick in the teeth for those cadets currently in training who won't be offered jobs - of course Maersk has never given guarantees in this regard.

    It brings into question the future of British seafarers within Maersk and uncertainty for those officers currently employed.

    The article also picks up on the re-flagging of vessels although Maersk haven't had any containerships under the UK flag since 2015 as far as I am aware.

  • #2
    Wonder if they are going to stop recruiting qualified British officers as well? Or if its just cadets? One of the few deep sea cargo companies where you can still get a job if you are British.

    On related flagging out news I see P&O ferries have also flagged out citing Brexit.

    Gonna be an interesting few years ahead I think...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by EH75 View Post
      Wonder if they are going to stop recruiting qualified British officers as well? Or if its just cadets? One of the few deep sea cargo companies where you can still get a job if you are British.

      On related flagging out news I see P&O ferries have also flagged out citing Brexit.

      Gonna be an interesting few years ahead I think...


      This is an interesting point.

      I am also concerned about P&O ferries as i was hoping to do a cadetship with them.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by EH75 View Post
        Wonder if they are going to stop recruiting qualified British officers as well? Or if its just cadets? One of the few deep sea cargo companies where you can still get a job if you are British.

        On related flagging out news I see P&O ferries have also flagged out citing Brexit.

        Gonna be an interesting few years ahead I think...
        This last year Maersk didn't take any deck cadets and so the real change is that they are stopping the engine side. I haven't heard anything concerning the future of Brits currently in the company/future recruitment. I would hope that if they decide to stop all UK intake that they allow the current officers to remain. However, I wouldn't be surprised if everyone was laid off following the boffins in the office deciding it is the cheapest option.

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        • #5
          Awkward, trying to shoehorn Brexit into the article when it doesn't appear that Brexit is even a consideration in Maersk's decision. Perhaps the writer is angling for a job at The Guardian?! Maersk Line hasn't had ships on the UK flag for a few years Like you say, Boo, a real kick in the teeth for those cadets who are now at the end of their cadetship and have been cut adrift. A bit of a surprise, really, when I can think of two junior officers sailing back in December who had been mucked around by the manning offices due to a lack of qualified relievers.

          The fact that the handful of current UK cadets have been told that there is zero chance of employment should ring warning bells for current UK officers, at least those in junior positions. Current 4/E will need to get promotion after two trips as Maersk is looking to phase out the 4/E position on board a lot of vessels.

          I might be wrong but this appears to simply be a costcutting exercise by Maersk, which is facing a need to control outgoings while struggling to improve a credit rating that risks being downgraded to junk status.

          I have heard anecdotally that some Indian engineers and Ukrainians have also been given bad news. Filipino cadet intake will be reduced. The Danish cadet pool will increase, but it appears that their income/grant will be essentially halved, from what I've been told. Thai crewmembers will not be offered any more contracts, and the Filipino deck crew are less than happy because they'll now have to sign on for nine months at a time.

          ?

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          • #6
            From what I know, they struggle to fill the vacancies for Danish cadets and around 80% of the cadets they do take on, decide not to take up employment after their cadetship. Their main cadet sourcing countries will now be India and Romania, to be fair, the UK cadetship system isn't really favourable for companies, Indian and Romanian cadets pay for their own education or receive grants from their governments, Maersk's only cost will be a few hundred dollars a month when they're onboard as cadets, plus the sheer number of Indian cadets allows them to skim the cream of the crop without losing large investments as is the case with British cadets.

            It seems recruitment of qualified officers is also over, last year I read they needed 60+ 2nd engineers by the end of 2018 due to the acquisition of Hamburg SUD, these 2Es were recruited strictly from India and Romania. It's no surprise that these two particular nationalities don't have union representation which allows contract changes to be made as and when wanted by the company.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Mors View Post
              From what I know, they struggle to fill the vacancies for Danish cadets and around 80% of the cadets they do take on, decide not to take up employment after their cadetship. Their main cadet sourcing countries will now be India and Romania, to be fair, the UK cadetship system isn't really favourable for companies, Indian and Romanian cadets pay for their own education or receive grants from their governments, Maersk's only cost will be a few hundred dollars a month when they're onboard as cadets, plus the sheer number of Indian cadets allows them to skim the cream of the crop without losing large investments as is the case with British cadets.

              It seems recruitment of qualified officers is also over, last year I read they needed 60+ 2nd engineers by the end of 2018 due to the acquisition of Hamburg SUD, these 2Es were recruited strictly from India and Romania. It's no surprise that these two particular nationalities don't have union representation which allows contract changes to be made as and when wanted by the company.
              To try and find the lighter side of an angering issue that highlights the lengths even world leading companies will go to to save a bit of bank, in New Zealand we pay for all our training with student loans, yet most are left to mad hustling looking for a cadetship, seemingly forgotten about by most companies and with opportunities scarce on NZ’s 9 flagged vessels. If Maersk is planning to save on academic costs, perhaps they could find the far south a little enticing?


              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Maritimer View Post

                The fact that the handful of current UK cadets have been told that there is zero chance of employment should ring warning bells for current UK officers, at least those in junior positions. Current 4/E will need to get promotion after two trips as Maersk is looking to phase out the 4/E position on board a lot of vessels.


                as a Maersk cadet myself, this affects me because now its guaranteed that I have no job at the end of my cadetship. its a shame but nothing we can do about it I guess. 4/E are being cut from all but approx 160 vessels. This is how Hamburg SUD have been manning their vessels apparently so it's following their manning structure.

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                • #9
                  https://www.facebook.com/1542582639/...2662354624097/

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                  • #10
                    Maersk are increasingly worried about the rise the Chinese State owned shipping line COSCO and are simply looking for further ways to save money for their shareholders and remain 'competitive'. If this involves flagging out from UK and/or ceasing to use UK labour then they will do it - as most other liner companies have already done. Unfortunately UK is a very minor consideration to Maersk and a a side show in comparison to the global outlook. Maersk are more interested in terminal access for their liner service than assisting UK Officers have a job, government will most likely just allow them terminal rights regardless with foreign crewed vessels.

                    China is steadily rising to be the worlds largest economy and COSCO is a fundamental part of the Chinese naval and trade strategy. China is slowly but surely creating the largest state owned logistics system the world has ever seen. This includes terminals, port infrastructure, ship yards, energy supply lines, logistics providers, all both inside and outside of China....Maersk simply cannot compete with such a creation and is bound to be bankrupted in the process. Denmark in comparison to China is a non-entity and cannot subsidize a container line to the extent Chinese state can and are not going to win this battle regardless of cost cutting. For example Maersk threw the can when the French suggested they were going to provide state subsidies to CMA CGM, same story when South Korea wisely subsidized Hyundai Heavy Merchant. Maersk is terrified of any steps away from globalization (think Brexit for example) and any resumption to historical norms in which states assist their shipping industry for strategic purposes. COSCO in this respect represents an existential threat to Maersk in general (and they certainly know it).

                    China has been played for fools by international conglomerates like Maersk in the past pushing the 'free trade' mantra (take actions of Jardine Matheson or HSBC for example) and aren't going to be tricked again and allow likes of Maersk and other internationalist foreign owned companies to take over their own ports and ships thereby relinquishing control of their nation to foreign powers, like stupid Britain has done over last 50 years for example (otherwise we would not have to negotiate with a foreign company such as Maersk to maintain trained seafarers or maintain a 'national' fleet (which will remain of course remain owned and controlled by foreign share holders?)). At some point China will probably put a requirement for all or a significant proportion of Chinese produced goods to be exported on Chinese built and flagged vessels and simply remove Maersk from their coast altogether. Maersk has done very well no doubt, but likelihood is that this is the end of the line for any further expansion by Maersk Line or terminals.

                    As some may remember Maersk tried to start a Chinese cadetship system which quicklyj and quietly ceased. Chinese government simply want them out and would not allow such interference. Ever wonder who organised the cyber attack against Maersk? Ever wonder why COSCO received a cyber attack some time after? This is all part of a much larger game being played out behind the scenes to which 99% of us are not privy. China is playing out a mercantilist policy to the book and we are only in the early stages.

                    Best thing UK could do is tell Maersk to get lost, stop subsidizing in effect their global operations through the Tonnage Tax and SED systems, and strike some sort of small deal with the Chinese, this would be in long term interest for the UK. Maersk aren't going to be as important as they once were, time to move on and adjust to new reality.

                    Here's an article for those that are interested anyway:

                    https://www.icontainers.com/us/2018/...rld-dominance/

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