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  • Cadetship Offer Timing

    Hi all, hope you can help.
    I'm hoping to start a cadetship in September 2019. I'm currently in the application process with various companies, and my strong preference is to have sea-time with a cruise ship company. I have had 2 interviews so far and both have resulted in a full offer - but, the training companies are not able to confirm who the sponsoring company would be until the start of the training. Both say that it's unlikely to be a cruise ship company.

    I have also been invited to an assessment day with Princess in March, an interview with a cruise ship company in February and have yet to hear back from Carnival. My problem is, should I accept one of the offers on the table or wait to see what happens with the others? The best offer I have has a deadline of about now and I don't want to give that up in the hope that I get another offer. But I would much prefer to be on a cruise ship or with one of the other highly reputable companies that are not confirmed. This must be a common problem as everyone seems to work on different recruitment dates.

    I'm tempted to accept the current offer and continue with pursuing the others but I don't want to upset anyone, and what happens if I try and get out of an accepted agreement if I get a better offer? Help! Does anyone have experience of this? How does it work? I really want to start my career on the right foot, but also in the right place. Any insight most welcome. Thanks, T.

  • #2
    Initially I would take whatever you perceive to be the best offer currently as an insurance policy (if you tell us who you have offers from then people will be able to give you an idea of what a cadetship is like with the companies who have offered you one) but I would continue with your applications to the cruise companies and if you get offered a cadetship by one of them then withdraw from the other cadetship. I wouldn't worry about "upsetting" them. You wouldn't be the first person to do something like that and you won't be the last. They will have a reserve list of people and I'm sure they'll be able to pass your place on to someone else without much trouble.

    You have to look after yourself first and foremost and if you want to work on cruise ships then the best way to do that is to get in at cadetship level. Don't feel some sort of misguided loyalty to the companies that have currently offered you a cadetship because you are unlikely to get any loyalty in return in this industry. You don't want to be looking back and regretting your choices in a few years while you are sitting on a bulk carrier on the other side of the world surrounded by people who don't speak English or sitting at home on the dole trying to get your first contract after qualifying because you were one of the majority who are not offered a job on qualification.

    I don't think you are really committed to anything until you start at college (even if you sign a contract before that) so I wouldn't worry too much about that side of things.

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    • #3
      That's really helpful, thank you. I'd rather not say who the offers are from on the forum at this stage but if I were to mention some companies that I have applied to I'd be happy to know if anyone has a thumbs up or down for any of them!
      SSTG
      Clyde,
      Chiltern,
      Carnival
      Princess.
      Thanks again. T.

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      • #4
        If you want to sail on cruises during your cadetship - go directly through a cruise ship company like Carnival or Princess. Unlikely to be put on cruises with the training companies.

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        • #5
          Clyde place a lot of cadets with Royal Caribbean... but they also place loads of cadets with Zodiac. Just realise that cruise ships can offer the bleakest employment opportunities for your future. I don’t know of any cruise officers that secured good jobs ashore when they finally gave up being at sea. It’s a great career if you’re going to stick at it for life... or you’re going to be an engineer, then you’re fine going ashore regardless.

          Accept your current best offer, and cancel it if something better comes along. Carnival are probably the best for cadetships on cruises.

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          • #6
            Thanks, all good info. I'm not too worried about the employment as my plan would be to move to yachts and work my way up. Thanks for the advise.T,

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Tops View Post
              I'm not too worried about the employment as my plan would be to move to yachts and work my way up.
              Possibly a bit eaiser if you have a couple of contracts qualified under your belt first.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by EH75 View Post
                Initially I would take whatever you perceive to be the best offer currently as an insurance policy (if you tell us who you have offers from then people will be able to give you an idea of what a cadetship is like with the companies who have offered you one) but I would continue with your applications to the cruise companies and if you get offered a cadetship by one of them then withdraw from the other cadetship. I wouldn't worry about "upsetting" them. You wouldn't be the first person to do something like that and you won't be the last. They will have a reserve list of people and I'm sure they'll be able to pass your place on to someone else without much trouble.

                You have to look after yourself first and foremost and if you want to work on cruise ships then the best way to do that is to get in at cadetship level. Don't feel some sort of misguided loyalty to the companies that have currently offered you a cadetship because you are unlikely to get any loyalty in return in this industry. You don't want to be looking back and regretting your choices in a few years while you are sitting on a bulk carrier on the other side of the world surrounded by people who don't speak English or sitting at home on the dole trying to get your first contract after qualifying because you were one of the majority who are not offered a job on qualification.

                I don't think you are really committed to anything until you start at college (even if you sign a contract before that) so I wouldn't worry too much about that side of things.
                Hey, was wondering if even after you’ve started college, can you still pull out of an offer without any penalties? Thanks

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                • #9
                  Depends on the company and whether they can be bothered to pursue you or not. Technically once you've started college and they have started paying out money for you/claimed smart funding then if there is a clause in your contract then yes they could come after you. Having said that, I know loads of people who quit during the cadetship when I was at college. I'm not aware of any of them being chased for money. A lot of the time I think the costs of pursuing cadets legally makes it not worth their while. That's not to say that your company wouldn't come after you theres no way to know for certain. I'd have a look at your contract and see exactly what it says regarding this.

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