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Day to day engine cadet/officer

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  • Day to day engine cadet/officer

    So I was thinking of taking a cadetship preferably in cargo rather than cruise looking at oil tankers and container ships and I was wondering whether anyone could help me in understanding as a cadet whilst on ship what you do on a day to day basis and what your watches will consist of. Then once you get your officer rank what you expect to change in your roles and what you do whilst on ship.
    I am only asking this because I see a lot of information about deck cadets and what they do so I think it would be good to see what you do as an engine cadet
    Thanks for any help

  • #2
    I'm starting my cadetship in September as an engineer though I have a fair idea what an engineer does on a daily basis:
    - For a few hours a day (around about 4 I believe) an engineer would be on watch in the engine control room
    - Testing various types of equipment in the engine room
    - undergoing routine maintenance on types of equipment in the engine room and other equipment around the ship
    - As a cadet you would be also expected to work on deck painting and scrapping.

    Tours on cargo deep sea vessels usually involves 4 months on 2 months off. As a cadet you would maybe have a week off and would be expected to return to college.

    Hope this helps

    Robert
    Phase 5 SPD engine cadet at city of Glasgow college. Doing a a combined motor and steam ticket.

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    • #3
      I believe you'll find the engineers will usually work 8-5 in the engine room during the day at sea. Then in the evening the go on what's called UMS (Unmanned Machinery Spaces) where basically they have a duty engineer who has to go and answer any engine room alarms (usually purifiers throwing their toys out the pram) and they also have to do rounds in the evening (usually done at about 9ish but depends) to check everything's running properly and nothing's leaking.
      In port the engines aren't running so it's often a good opportunity to overhaul something or do essential/routine maintenance. This is all from my experience listening to the ginger beers complain about how they have to work for an hour in the evening every three days, so an actual engineer might come along and tell how terrible it all is working so hard and having sleeping at night...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by HarmlessWeasel View Post
        I believe you'll find the engineers will usually work 8-5 in the engine room during the day at sea. Then in the evening the go on what's called UMS (Unmanned Machinery Spaces) where basically they have a duty engineer who has to go and answer any engine room alarms (usually purifiers throwing their toys out the pram) and they also have to do rounds in the evening (usually done at about 9ish but depends) to check everything's running properly and nothing's leaking.
        In port the engines aren't running so it's often a good opportunity to overhaul something or do essential/routine maintenance. This is all from my experience listening to the ginger beers complain about how they have to work for an hour in the evening every three days, so an actual engineer might come along and tell how terrible it all is working so hard and having sleeping at night...
        That rings a bell
        io parlo morse

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        • #5
          On cruise ships , a lot more drinking than the Brains Department up stair!

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          • #6
            Yeah, I meant they spend a few hours on watch and spend the rest of the 10-12 hour shift on maintenance tasks etc
            Phase 5 SPD engine cadet at city of Glasgow college. Doing a a combined motor and steam ticket.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by therookie101 View Post
              I'm starting my cadetship in September as an engineer though I have a fair idea what an engineer does on a daily basis:
              - For a few hours a day (around about 4 I believe) an engineer would be on watch in the engine control room
              - Testing various types of equipment in the engine room
              - undergoing routine maintenance on types of equipment in the engine room and other equipment around the ship
              - As a cadet you would be also expected to work on deck painting and scrapping.

              Tours on cargo deep sea vessels usually involves 4 months on 2 months off. As a cadet you would maybe have a week off and would be expected to return to college.

              Hope this helps

              Robert
              Taking a cargo ship that runs UMS
              Day starts at 8, all engineers are in the control room normally about 7.45, the 2nd will brief people on what work is to be done today/ continued on with everyone except the duty engineer then bimbles off to do such things.
              Duty Engineer, is first task will be taking the log - normally takes our lot about 2 hours its going around filling in tank levels temperatures and different bits making sure everything is happy and topping up as required.
              10am tea break sit around have a natter and a cuppa
              10.30 back to work, normally now the duty engineer can get on with some of his own tasks depending on what they are as if an alarm goes he will still be the person who goes to sort it out. everyone else continues doing what ever they were at, we had a fun week where people were swapping out and overhauling sewage system valves, at sea you are unlikely to take the head of an engine but certain pumps and things can be stripped down and worked on.
              12 -13 lunch
              13-15 more of the same
              15-17 more of the same and the duty engineer takes a good walk around so he hopefully gets a good nights sleep
              everyone up the stairs and the alarm system is set to the duty engineers cabin and on our ships if right the cadets cabin

              10pm: duty engineer goes down for an hour again this is to check everything and a good chance to deal with any problems before getting into bed

              any alarm in the engineer between now and 8am is the responsibility of the duty engineer so alarm goes, he gets up /out of the gym/ mess room/ office/ cabin and heads down hopefully either deals with it quickly gets permission to spend the night with it switched off, or calls someone else normally the ETO and CE for us. back to bed and hope nothing else goes wrong sometimes you get through the night and some times you get a lot.

              next day, duty engineer swaps round and repeat

              mostly our cadets will do a very limited amount of painting and scraping, they will be involved if a bilge needs mucked out but mostly they will follow around with the different engineers so they can experience what the job is, as they progress they take the log alone with the duty engineer following along behind doing it so they can compare and if possible they will get some little projects for themselves to plan etc
              you can take it with a pinch of salt, but i prefer it with a nip of whisky

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              • #8
                My beast is in week 6 of her 4 month phase 2 sea time. Her shift pattern is 4 hours on, 8 hours off, and repeat. The 4 hours on duty seems to have been equally split between the 12-4, 4-8, and 8-12 watches. From what I gather (she is not the most communicative of my kids), she shadows the engineer on duty at the start of shift, and is then allocated tasks as per her TRB, or as required. That varies from work down in the bilges through to acting on shore party security, counting passsengers off the boat and then back on again. A forthcoming treat (her words) involve messing around with the shipboard sewage tanks? Great fun, apparently.

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                • #9
                  I just can't wait to get started.
                  Phase 5 SPD engine cadet at city of Glasgow college. Doing a a combined motor and steam ticket.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by SaltyDog49 View Post
                    My beast is in week 6 of her 4 month phase 2 sea time. Her shift pattern is 4 hours on, 8 hours off, and repeat. The 4 hours on duty seems to have been equally split between the 12-4, 4-8, and 8-12 watches. From what I gather (she is not the most communicative of my kids), she shadows the engineer on duty at the start of shift, and is then allocated tasks as per her TRB, or as required. That varies from work down in the bilges through to acting on shore party security, counting passsengers off the boat and then back on again. A forthcoming treat (her words) involve messing around with the shipboard sewage tanks? Great fun, apparently.
                    That's the difference between UMS ships and manned engine rooms.
                    basically a passenger ship will have 24hr coverage in the engine room the same as the bridge.
                    you can take it with a pinch of salt, but i prefer it with a nip of whisky

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                    • #11
                      So if I am understanding this correctly dependant on what sort of ship you are on there is either a manned engine room where you spend 4 hours on 8 hours off as part of a 3 watch system. Or you are set to a whole day of being "on duty" for the engine room on a unmanned engine room ship. What are the most common now as I speak to my dad quite regularly about it (he was in 30 years ago AB) and they used the 3 watch system.
                      One more thing if you use a 3 watch system what do you do for the 8 hours you are on watch? (sleep, chill, maintenance) - same for if you are not on duty on a unmanned engine room ship do you do maintenace all day at set hours and free for the rest.

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                      • #12
                        Ok the most common would be UMS, basically as there are a lot more cargo ships than passenger ships around the world. That said there is nothing to stop a UMS ship to run watches (normally if something is misbehaving)
                        the watch system tends to be the same as for deckies, so its the two 4 hour watches and then probably a couple of hours 'over time' during the day to do some work. the rest is rest time, to be used how you wish.
                        UMS, your duty day 8-5 isn't that different from the rest of your days after 5, it can be pretty similar as well if you go to the gym you can do that, dinner, tv then bed the difference is if an alarm goes you drop everything and head down to the engine room, and we all in the bar talk about what we think the problem is.
                        you can take it with a pinch of salt, but i prefer it with a nip of whisky

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                        • #13
                          Understood thanks very much

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