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  • Past questions i found on my computer

    What are IMO conventions?

    (International Maritime Organisation) is the regulation body of international standards that governs and manages the shipping industry.

    Conventions are put in place by the IMO to specialise in certain fields of the governing body, such conventions are:

    - MARPOL 73/78 (International Convention For The Prevention Of Pollution By Ships).
    - SOLAS (The International Convention For The Safety Of Life At Sea).
    - STCW ’95 (The International Convention For The Standards Of Training Certification and Watchkeeping).
    - ISMC (Internation Safety Management Code).
    - COLREG (The Internation Convention For The Prevention Of Collisions At Sea).

    MARPOL 73/78

    The MARPOL convention is the main convention covering prevention of pollution of the marine environment by ships from operational and accidental causes. It is a combination of two treaties adopted in 1973 and 1978 respectively, and is updated by amendments through the years.

    The convention includes regulations aimed at preventing and minimising pollution from ships – both accidental pollution and that from routine operations – and currently includes 6 technical annexes:

    Annex I – Regulation for the prevention of pollution by oil.
    Annex II – Regulation for the prevention of pollution by noxious liquid substances in bulk form.
    Annex III – Regulation for the prevention of pollution by harmful substances in packaged form.
    Annex IV – Regulation for the prevention of pollution by sewage from ships.
    Annex V – Regulation for the prevention of pollution by garbage from ships.
    Annex VI – Regulation for the prevention of air pollution by ships.

    Annex I – this pertains to the discharge of oily water over board, special areas have been designated as sensitive to the discharge of oil.

    Discharge outside of special areas:

    - Applicable to ships 400GRT and above.
    - Ship must be en route.
    - Discharge processed through approved filtering equipment.
    - Oil content must not exceed 15ppm.
    - Oily mixture must not originate from cargo.
    Discharge inside special areas:

    - Ship must be en route.
    - Discharge is processed through approved filtering equipment.
    - Oil content does not exceed 15ppm.
    - Oily mixture must not originate from cargo.
    - An automatic stopping device must be in use.

    Special areas include:

    - Red sea.
    - Mediterranean sea.
    - Baltic sea.
    - Black sea.
    - Gulfs area.
    - Gulf of Aden
    - Antarctica
    - North West European waters
    - Oman sea
    - Southern South African waters.

    Discharge is prohibited in Antarctic; all pumping operations must be recorded in oil record book.

    Oil Record Book

    Every ship over 400GRT must own and use an oil record book. Entries pertaining the following or made:

    - Ballasting or cleaning of fuel tanks.
    - Discharge of dirty ballast or cleaning water from oil fuel tanks.
    - Collection and disposal of oil residues.
    - Discharge overboard of bilge water, which has accumulated in machinery spaces.
    - Bunkering of fuel or bulk lubricating oil.

    When filling out the Oil Record Book the following must be included:

    - Date, operational code and item number all in chronological order.
    - Signatures of the officer in charge of operation and the master.
    - Any filtering equipment failure to be recorded.

    The book must be readily available for inspection and preserved for a period of 3 years after the last entry has been made.



    Annex IV – this pertains to the discharge of sewage overboard and applies to all ships over 200GRT.

    Sewage may be discharged overboard within 3NM of land only through and approved and certified sewage treatment plant and the ship is travelling at no less the 4knots.

    Sewage may be discharged overboard within 3 and 12NM through an approved and certified sewage treatment plant or through an approved comminuted and disinfecting system.

    Sewage may be discharged overboard over 12NM through system; raw sewage may be discharged if the ship’s speed is no less than 4knots.

    Annex V – This pertains to the discharge of garbage overboard and restriction due to special areas and type of garbage. Clear posters must be displayed around the ship detailing what can be dumped and where. A garbage management plan must be in effect on board and all dumping must be recorded in the garbage record book.

    Garbage type Outside special area Inside special area
    Plastic Prohibited Prohibited
    Floating dunnage 25NM off shore Prohibited
    Paper, rags, glass, bottle, metal 12NM off shore Prohibited
    All other garbage comminuted or ground 3NM off shore Prohibited
    Food waste (not ground) 12NM off shore 12NM off shore
    Food waste (ground) 3NM off shore 12NM off shore

    Special areas include:

    - Mediterranean sea.
    - Baltic sea.
    - Black sea.
    - Gulf’s area.
    - North sea.
    - Gulf of Mexico.
    - Wider Caribbean.
    - Antarctic.

    Annex VI – Pertains to the Exhaust of harmful gasses by ships, such as Nitrogen Oxide and Sulphur Oxide (Nox and Sox) and how to reduce them. This annex limits the sulphur content in the marine bunker fuel to 4.5% generally. In special areas or “Sulphur Emission Control Areas” sulphur in fuel is capped to 1.5%




    STCW

    Chapter 1 – General Provisions
    Chapter 2 – Master/ Deck Department
    Chapter 3 – Engine Department
    Chapter 4 – Radio Department
    Chapter 5 – Specific Requirements for Tankers
    Chapter 6 – Proficiency in Survival Craft

    What are M-Notices?

    M-Notices stands for marine notice, there are 3 different types of M-notice, these are:

    Merchant Shipping Notice (MSN) – White in colour.
    - These convey information that merchant vessels must understand and comply with.

    Marine Guidance Note (MGN) – Blue in colour.
    - These involve information that is to be used as a guideline to improve safety and life at sea and keep pollution to a minimum.

    Marine Information Note (MIN) – Green in colour.

    - These contain information for use of more limited audiences such as training establishments and equipment manufacturers; this information may only be valid for a limited period of time.

    MGN 69

    MGN 69 – Training and certification guidance – part II conduct of MCA oral examinations

    This is the booklet that the examiner will refer to throughout an exam. It covers the general requirements for certification, including:

    - Valid medical.
    - Minimum sea time completion.
    - Completion of approved training.

    EOOW oral exam requirements covering:

    - Marine engineering.
    - Electrical electronic and control engineering.
    - Maintenance and repair.
    - Control the operation of the ship and care for persons on board.

    Certificates carried on UK registered ships

    All merchant vessels are required to carry the following certification:

    - Certificate of compliance (ISMC)
    - Safety management certificate
    - International oil pollution prevention certificate
    - International sewage pollution certificate
    - International load line certificate/ load line exemption certificate.

    Lifeboat launching procedure

    Before launching the life boat it essential that all crew members have mustered and have carried out their duties (which should be known to them EPIRB and SART). The procedure for launching the lifeboat is as follows:

    - Remove the securing pins.
    - Disconnect the charging cable.
    - Close the drain plugs.
    - Ensure the crew boards safely, dawned in the proper PPE and secured.
    - Release the gripes.
    - Secure the hatches.
    - Check it is clear bellow.
    - Operate brake release.
    - When landed in the water release the falls.
    - Start the engine.
    - Release the painter and steer away.

    What are the EBIRB and SART?

    The Emergency Position Indication Radio Beacon (EPIRB) can be found in a free-floating position on the ship, such as the bridge wing. This allows the EPIRB to float to the surface without obstruction when submerged. When in water the EPIRB will automatically activate sending a distress beacon at 121.5MHz and 406MHz.

    The Search And Rescue Transponder (SART) must be manually turned on and will only activate within an 8 nautical mile radius of and x-band radar signal.










    What is COSWP?

    The Code Of Safe Working Practices (COSWP) provides very useful information on the best working practices to promote safety of life, equipment and environment. COSWP covers many areas in safety, including:

    - COSHH
    - Use of safety signs
    - Permits to work
    - PPE
    - Enclosed Space Entry
    - Hot work
    - Fire precautions
    - General Maintenance
    - Emergency procedures
    - Risk assessment.

    How do you carry out an enclosed space entry?

    - Carry out a risk assessment.
    - Receive a permit to work.
    - 24 hours before entry, allow the space to ventilate, ensure the space is marked off clearly and the crew are aware of work being carried out.
    - Measure the oxygen content, a minimum of 20% oxygen content should be present before entry.
    - Measure combustible gas content with an explosimeter, and toxic gas content if necessary.
    Before entry ensure the following is available at the entrance:
    - Rescue and resuscitation equipment.
    - Testing equipment for regular checks
    - Responsible person in attendance.
    - Easily available illumination and access.
    - Communication agreements with person in attendance.
    Ensure all required PPE is worn:
    - Overalls.
    - Hard hat
    - Gloves.
    - Steel cap boots
    - BA set if necessary.







    What is a risk assessment?

    A risk assessment is an examination of what could cause harm when a task is being carried out, so that decisions can be made as to whether enough precautions have been taken or whether more should taken to prevent harm.

    The risk assessment first establishes the hazards present at a job and the risks that arise from a hazard. It will also contain information on precautions already carried out to reduce the risks such as permits to work, PPE, warning signs.

    The risk assessment will address any risks to health and safety involved in a job. Advice is given on further precautions to take in relation to the use of PPE or the location of further information pertaining to safety procedures.

    Starting Main Engine (1 Hour Notice)

    - Drain HFO tank of water.
    - Drain air bottle.
    - Pressurise pneumatic exhaust valve.
    - Start lube oil pump.
    - Lubricate cylinder liner.
    - Start cooling water pump (ensure water temperature is above 60ºC).
    - Open indicator cocks.
    - Engage turning gear for 15 – 30 mins (2 full revolutions).
    - Check the indicator cocks for fuel/ water.
    - Disengage turning gear, engage safety lock.
    - Open starting air valve and turbo charger drain valve.
    - Blow though main engine.
    - Check indicator cocks, and close if all clear.
    - Once complete, on the bridge command, the main engine is started by releasing high pressure air into the engine.

    Main engine safeties

    - Cylinder head relief valve
    - Crank case explosion door
    - Oil mist detector
    - Starting air relief valve
    - Flame trap
    - Running direction interlock
    - Turning gear interlock
    - More to come




    Purpose of cylinder head relief valve

    The cylinder head relief valve is used to reduce excess pressure created in the cylinder, this is likely to occur during slow running of the engine or if fuel injectors leak during priming.

    Safeties on air starting line

    - Flame traps
    - Fusible plug (air bottle)
    - Relief valve
    - Bursting disks

    Safeties and checks on a boiler

    Safeties:
    - Safety valve
    - Low water alarm
    - High water alarm
    - Fusible plug?
    - More to come

    Checks:
    - Water level (boiler gauge glass)
    - Steam pressure
    - Temperature
    - Flame colour.
    - More to come

    Where does the steam go when the safety valve is activated?

    Steam will be redirected to the funnel where it will be vented to the atmosphere.

    Mist in refrigeration room, what are your actions?

    Do not know the answer however it can be assumed, as it is mist, there is a leak somewhere before or after the compressor. My answer would be to shut down the system, open air vents to the refrigeration room, turn on fans if available. Once the mist clears inspect the system for leaks, pressure test on evaporator tubes.







    Procedure of isolating a motor

    Do not know the proper procedure, it is known that the examiner is looking for a risk assessment to be carried out, and a permit to work and isolation certificate authorised. My answer would be to carry out a risk assessment, get permit to work and isolation certificate authorised. Ensure all PPE is worn and the crew know of the maintenance being carried out; clearly mark off at the main switchboard and local control panel not to switch on. Shut down the system and earth the motor to drain any residual voltage. Carry on with dismantling the motor.

    Starting Generator

    - Check lube oil levels.
    - Open the indicator cocks.
    - Prime the lube oil.
    - Open all cooler valves.
    - Turn the flywheel (using turning bar) check for resistance and water/ fuel at indicator cocks.
    - Remove turning bar.
    - Drain the air bottle.
    - Blow through engine.
    - Close the indicator cocks pull lever from stop to start.
    - When at 25rpm switch to run.
    - Put on load by closing air circuit breaker.
    - Check operating parameters.
    - Synchronise and put on the board.

    Synchronising Generator

    - Engine has started and operating parameters are normal.
    - Check the earth lamps are working with adequate brightness.
    - Ensure synchronising relay is at open position.
    - Bring the running generator to optimum parameters (480V, 60Hz).
    - Bring the on coming generator to optimum parameters.
    - Turn on synchronising relay.
    - Watch the synchroscope, adjusting the generator speed until a steady slow speed is given by the synchroscope needle.
    - Energise the breakers once the synchroscope needle reaches 11 o’ clock.
    - Check the on coming generators parameters are the same as the running generators.






    Generator safeties and checks

    Safeties:
    - Low oil level alarm/ trip
    - High oil temperature alarm/ trip
    - Jacket water low pressure alarm/ trip
    - Over speed trip
    - Over load trip
    - High/ low frequency trip
    - Reverse power trip
    Checks:
    - Lube oil levels
    - Exhaust gas temperature
    - Turbocharger (inlet/outlet) temperature
    - Cooler (inlet/ outlet temperature)
    - Jacket cooling water (inlet/ outlet) temperature

    Electrical Blackout Procedure

    - Inform bridge.
    - Operate general engineers alarm.
    - Start emergency generator.
    - If generators are in alarm condition shut down and isolate.
    - If a common fault (loss of fuel supply) rectify fault.
    - Start generators and put on the board.
    - Start essential equipment (L.O. pumps, Economiser circulating pumps).
    - Inform chief engineer generators are running correctly.
    - Start M/E and steering gear.
    - Fin fault and carry out preventative measures.
    - Start non-essential equipment.
    - Inform bridge.















    Starting Bilge Pumping System

    - Open overboard discharge valve.
    - Open main sea cock for pump (prime the pump).
    - Start the bilge pump.
    - Open the valve for the affected compartment to be pumped.
    - Slowly close main sea cock.
    - Bilges to be pumped through oily water separator.

    Starting Oily Water Separator

    - Ensure ship is running in waters where bilges can be pumped.
    - Turn on power for oily water content monitor and separator.
    - Open sea water inlet valve to separator.
    - Start separator.
    - After 10min of flushing through with sea water, set the separator to draw from bilge holding tank.

    Steering Gear Checks

    The steering gear should be tested 12 hours before the ship sails. Checks to be carried out are:

    1. Check steering gear flat for leaks.
    2. Call bridge to test the communication system.
    3. Start one pump and one control system.
    4. Swing rudder through its movement; ensure it is free to turn.
    5. Check rudder indicator follows the rudder.
    6. Stop control system; check alarm systems and auto start if stand by system is working.
    7. Repeat steps 4 & 5.
    8. Stop pump; check alarms and auto start to ensure auto start of stand by pump works. Stand by pump should cut in.
    9. Repeat steps 4 – 7.

    The rudder must move though it’s full movement using every pump, every control system, and every steering position.

    Vessels on short voyages must carry out these checks every week.

    Every three months steering the vessel for the steering flat with the emergency steering should be carried out.

    35º - 35º and 35º - 30º in 28 seconds should be carried out every 3 months.

    In emergency conditions the steering gear should be able to manoeuvre 15º - 15º in 60 seconds at half service speed (min 7knts)
    Scavenge Space Fire

    A scavenge space fire may be caused by unburned fuel/ carbon blown from the cylinder to the scavenge space. Fuel may be unburned due to:
    - Faulty injection.
    - Faulty fuel pump timing.
    - Incorrect fuel condition.
    - Lack of scavenge air.
    - Partially chocked exhaust.
    - Low compression.
    - Afterburning.
    - Faulty/ worn piston ring.

    A scavenge fire may be indicated by:
    - High exhaust temperature in the effected unit.
    - Loss of power.
    - High local temperature in scavenge trunk.
    - Irregular running.
    - Smoke in exhaust.
    - Surging turbo charger.
    - Sparks/ flames from scavenge drains.

    In case of a scavenge fire the following procedure must be carried out:
    - Inform bridge/ chief engineer (request main engine slow down)
    - Activate general engineers alarm.
    - Slow down main engine (if not done automatically).
    - Shut off fuel to the effected unit.
    - Increase lubrication of cylinder.
    - Close scavenge drains.
    - Monitor the situation, if the fire persists shut down main engine.
    - Engage turning gear, continually turn and lubricate engine.
    - Smother turbo charger inlet filters.
    - If fire continues activate scavenge space fixed fire fighting installation, deploy fire team for boundary cooling.
    Maybe I will never be
    All the things that I want to be
    But now is not the time to cry
    Now's the time to find out why

  • #2
    While its a good idea a fair few of these relate directly to assignments, which dont change from year to year, whilst its hard to prove plagerism on a very factual subject as theres little room to explain MARPOL in your own words. it does give people an unfair advantage and also stops them learning which defeats the point
    you can take it with a pinch of salt, but i prefer it with a nip of whisky

    Comment


    • #3
      Saying that isolation of a motor, ignoring permit to work (often not needed on low voltage) and there should be generic risk assesments for electrical work procedure would be to:
      stop motor
      isloate breaker and provide lock out tag out procedure
      prove dead with line tester not a multi meter, : test line tester works
      check all phases - phases and phase to earth
      test line tester still works done with dedicated proving unit
      earthing down is only needed for high voltage work
      you can take it with a pinch of salt, but i prefer it with a nip of whisky

      Comment


      • #4
        ermmmmm no no no....... it's a motor of any voltage, you are working on it it NEEDS a PTW (permit to work) it is rotating machinery for a start, you have gone to the trouble of isolating it therefore it must have a PTW.

        Rough rule of thumb.....
        Everything / job / etc should have a risk assessment (of some sort) even if it is a file and reviewed every 2 years (max) but not every job needs a PTW
        HOWEVER if you need a PTW there really MUST be a Risk Assessment attached to the PTW
        Trust me I'm a Chief.

        Views expressed by me are mine and mine alone.
        Yes I work for the big blue canoe company.
        No I do not report things from here to them as they are quite able to come and read this stuff for themselves.


        Twitter:- @DeeChief

        Comment


        • #5
          Different companies and different SMS's require permits for varying jobs, my present company requires a PTW on electrical machinery if the chief engineer deems it necessary (I always do for work directly on a motor), yes there should be a generic risk assessment on file or a specific risk assessment for the task for any job you are carrying out and as chiefy says, if you are having to isolate a motor to carry out a job safely then there should be a permit to work as well. The other major thing to add to the list above is to inform the relevant people, for instance you wouldn't isolate a main engine cooling water pump without informing the EOOW / duty engineer and you wouldn't isolate a winch without informing the mate.

          And also from the MARPOL requirement for pumping machinery space bilges in the OP, please note that there is NO REQUIREMENT IN MARPOL FOR THE SHIP TO BE 12 MILES OFFSHORE.

          I still hear cadets coming to sea having been taught by the colleges that you need to be 12 miles offshore to pump bilges, this is an old rule which refereed to 100ppm separators which are no longer allowed and therefore the 12 mile rule does not exist any longer.
          Go out, do stuff

          Comment


          • #6
            Indeed....again that can also be company specific. MARPOL doesn't say anything about it, however a lot of companies "like" you to be 12 or 25miles from land.....

            As for isolating a winch without telling the deck team...pppffftttttttt
            Trust me I'm a Chief.

            Views expressed by me are mine and mine alone.
            Yes I work for the big blue canoe company.
            No I do not report things from here to them as they are quite able to come and read this stuff for themselves.


            Twitter:- @DeeChief

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Chiefy View Post
              As for isolating a winch without telling the deck team...pppffftttttttt
              Well yeah, obviously I was talking about exam answers rather than practice!
              Go out, do stuff

              Comment


              • #8
                These are past Oral Questions not assignment questions !! Just some Documents i was given on the ship
                Maybe I will never be
                All the things that I want to be
                But now is not the time to cry
                Now's the time to find out why

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Chiefy View Post
                  ermmmmm no no no....... it's a motor of any voltage, you are working on it it NEEDS a PTW (permit to work) it is rotating machinery for a start, you have gone to the trouble of isolating it therefore it must have a PTW.
                  Having spent some time isolating to allow removing/replacing or fault finding of motors we never once dealt with a permit to work for it, so either our as clanky says our SMS didnt require it, the staff on the ship didnt bother with it, or some other reason

                  Beef, it still covers the same areas as marine management and H&S work at the college mainly explain marpol etc i guess it comes to what on the internet is an acceptable source,
                  you can take it with a pinch of salt, but i prefer it with a nip of whisky

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Read COSWOP there should be a permit for electrical work, it is both electrical and rotational, seems there maybe some serious failing there to be honest
                    Trust me I'm a Chief.

                    Views expressed by me are mine and mine alone.
                    Yes I work for the big blue canoe company.
                    No I do not report things from here to them as they are quite able to come and read this stuff for themselves.


                    Twitter:- @DeeChief

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      As with Chiefy i was under the assumption , A permit is required for all Electrical work wether this be LV or HV other than Lights etc , but a Working at height permit might be required for that.
                      Maybe I will never be
                      All the things that I want to be
                      But now is not the time to cry
                      Now's the time to find out why

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Atleast this gives people some indication of what to expect for there orals.
                        Thanks mate
                        "My Job"

                        It's not my place to run the boat
                        the fog horn I can't blow.

                        It's not my place to say just where
                        the boat's allowed to go

                        It's not my right to dock the boat
                        or even clang the bell

                        But let the damn thing
                        start to sink AND SEE WHO CATCHES HELL!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ETwhat? View Post
                          Having spent some time isolating to allow removing/replacing or fault finding of motors we never once dealt with a permit to work for it, so either our as clanky says our SMS didnt require it, the staff on the ship didnt bother with it, or some other reason
                          You have fallen down the chasm that exists between custom and practise. Naughty naughty! The OP's bit doesn't mention another important lifesaver when working on rotating electrical machines; many have heaters built in to prevent condensation, especially if mounted outside. These need isolating in order to prevent becoming a crispy critter, all of which should(should!) be found in the risk assessment.
                          '... English is about as pure as a cribhouse whore. We don't
                          just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued other languages
                          down alleyways to beat them unconscious and rifle their pockets for
                          new vocabulary.' - James Davis Nicoll

                          Comment

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