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Is working on board an LNG dangerous for health?

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  • Is working on board an LNG dangerous for health?

    Because I 've heard quite a few people saying that LNG could be dangerous for health(due to gas/fumes/etc) I would like to know if there is actually any legit and proven danger for people whop work on LNG vessels for long periods of time.
    Most people don't give any actual facts when they say that and mostly use it as an excuse for not liking LNG vessels and working on them but it is better to be safe than sorry.
    Are there any people who have worked a long time on board LNG that noticed any problems or something in their health?

  • #2
    Have never sailed on LNG ships or tankers in general, but I'm pretty sure that the gas stays firmly in the tanks were it's meant to be.

    Some of them burn it in the main engines, but I would imagine that they are pretty careful about not having it leaking around the ship.

    Maybe someone who has sailed on LNG ships can clarify the situation, but I think that what you are hearing is the usual ill informed nonsense.
    Go out, do stuff

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Clanky View Post

      Maybe someone who has sailed on LNG ships can clarify the situation, but I think that what you are hearing is the usual ill informed nonsense.
      I've not sailed on them but I have worked with them and it is nonsense. As Clank says, the LNG stays in the cargo tanks, with the exception of the boil off gas which is used by the vessel.

      Now, if LNG was to leak it would be a serious problem and can be harmful, but the chances of this happening are miniscule. In the entire history Of LNG carriers, there has never been a serious incident involving the cargo ever.

      LNG is the future and very well paid part of the industry to be in, so if you have the chance to go on one, then take it!
      I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

      All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

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      • #4
        I have done some LNG & LPG time, and the above is all correct, the gas is contained in an effectively closed system. There are mechanisms for venting the gas, but that is certainly not 'the norm'.

        In terms of exposure to toxic/harmful substances, I'd dare say Gas boats are probably the safest (apart from pax, but some people are allergic to talking cargoes). Oil tankers have vapour everywhere, RoRo has vehicle fumes all over the place, and containers, well, some of the stuff you get leaking out of them.... stand well back.

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        • #5
          When I was at sea in the 80's we had to have a blood test every year if we worked on tankers. It was to measure the level of platelets. If your count was low then it could be an early indicator of Sickle Cell Anemia or Leukemia as it was believed that fumes from Crude oil made the problem worse or even caused it. If our blood test was low we had to have 6 months away from tankers. I have no idea if you still have the test or indeed if they proved it was hogwash?

          As has been said, you smell cargo on oil tankers all the time or at least the exhaust gasses from the scrubbers. Gas carriers are closed loop systems and only have emergency venting which vents at high speed to prevent flame travel in the event of rapid boil off. The only other venting goes back to the Engine Room for fuel for the propulsion - or it did in my day! Gastor used 165 tonnes of heavy oil a day when running empty but that dropped to 16 tonnes a day when she burned boil off in her boilers.

          Hope this helps

          Ian
          "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.
          "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

          "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Hatchorder View Post
            When I was at sea in the 80's we had to have a blood test every year if we worked on tankers. It was to measure the level of platelets. If your count was low then it could be an early indicator of Sickle Cell Anemia or Leukemia as it was believed that fumes from Crude oil made the problem worse or even caused it. If our blood test was low we had to have 6 months away from tankers. I have no idea if you still have the test or indeed if they proved it was hogwash?
            Blood tests are still done or they were a few years back when I last had one...
            I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

            All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

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            • #7
              I have sailed the last 15 years on LNG ships and they are probably the safest ships around. I say 'probably' because I haven't sailed on all types of ships so cannot be 100% sure. AS for fumes, if you are breathing the cargo there is a big issue!! The containment system is very robust for the obvious reasons that you don't want to let the cargo out.

              As for health there have been no ill effects for me, except good food making me eat too much!!
              If you can't laugh, you shouldn't have joined!!

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