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Essential Knots

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  • Essential Knots

    Seems to be a problem now with officers being unable to tie basic knots, this could be from spending too much time on the bridge than working on deck or from bad training on board. Some are taught on the EDH but I can't remember which ones.

    Here are some knots that every deck officer should know. Suggest more if you think I've missed any.

    Essential:

    Round turn and two half hitch - Many uses throughout a vessel for securing things
    Bowline - Again many uses
    Sheet bend - Used for securing to ropes together also used for flags etc.
    Rolling hitch - Good for securing wires and cargo hoses etc...
    Clove hitch - Many uses, best one for tying rat guards onto rails etc...

    Can also be a good idea to use the "slipped" version of some of the above knots to untie them faster.


    Not essential:

    Granny knot - Using this will make you look like a complete novice

  • #2
    Stokers' dhobi hitch?
    Go out, do stuff

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    • #3
      Animated version on this site there are a few others.
      Learn to tie a bowline one handed useful if you need rescuing and you get a line thrown to you. Love that knot.

      http://www.animatedknots.com/indexbo...matedknots.com

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Midge View Post
        Animated version on this site there are a few others.
        Learn to tie a bowline one handed useful if you need rescuing and you get a line thrown to you. Love that knot.

        http://www.animatedknots.com/indexbo...matedknots.com
        Used to be able to do it but fell out of practice! We taught it on a sailing course once by towing people a long way behind a rescue boat while they did it... Health and safety didn't appreciate it so much and banned it....

        Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Clanky View Post
          Stokers' dhobi hitch?
          Here is the full gammut of engineers knots:

          knots.jpg

          In the words of the doors of the Heart of Gold - "Glad to be of service!"
          "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.
          "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

          "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Inland Pirate View Post
            Used to be able to do it but fell out of practice! We taught it on a sailing course once by towing people a long way behind a rescue boat while they did it... Health and safety didn't appreciate it so much and banned it....

            Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk
            you can do a round turn two half hitches one handed and tie/untie whilst there's tension on the line. Much better

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            • #7
              Originally posted by HarmlessWeasel View Post
              you can do a round turn two half hitches one handed and tie/untie whilst there's tension on the line. Much better
              No it's not, a round turn and two half hitches will tighten under tension and if you have it tied around you will cause damage.

              Glad to hear that you don't have people trying to tie knots around themselves while being towed through the water any more. It's not needed and is more of a gimic than useful training.
              Go out, do stuff

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Clanky View Post
                No it's not, a round turn and two half hitches will tighten under tension and if you have it tied around you will cause damage.

                Glad to hear that you don't have people trying to tie knots around themselves while being towed through the water any more. It's not needed and is more of a gimic than useful training.
                Aye tied around you it'll squeeze you or whatever it's tied to, but you can tie and untie the knot whilst it's under tension. All you have to do is undo the hitches while the round turn is taking the majority of the strain. When tying a bowline you need to take all the weight of the line in one hand while you tie with the other

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                • #9
                  Thought of another one figure of eight, not sure if you lot use it on ships but you do sailing.

                  As for being towed using a bowline, I was never taught it being towed, but for use in an emergency, to secure yourself so you don't float away that kind of thing.
                  An old RN sea dog I know has a thing about it, I used to go out sailing with him.
                  Before you went anywhere you always had a 'lesson' in something. He did the 'show me a bowline' thing, I'd learnt it with the squirrel going round a tree etc. At the mention of the word squirrel I swear he blew a gasket, he went an odd colour, then insisted I learnt it one handed and behind my back, before he returned to a normal pink colour.

                  He was a mine of information and had an unforgiving character, and got very upset if he saw anyone with their legs out over a rail on any boat he saw.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by HarmlessWeasel View Post
                    you can do a round turn two half hitches one handed and tie/untie whilst there's tension on the line. Much better
                    The point of the bowline being that you can tie it one hand if you fell in the water breaking one arm - and when they try and pull you back onboard, it doesn't tighten and cut you in half.
                    ?Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn?t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.?

                    ? Mark Twain
                    myBlog | @alistairuk | flickr | youtube Views and opinions expressed are those of myself and not representative of any employer or other associated party.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Clanky View Post
                      Glad to hear that you don't have people trying to tie knots around themselves while being towed through the water any more. It's not needed and is more of a gimic than useful training.
                      It was fun for the kids on days with no winds! Wasn't like we were hooning about the lake at stupid speeds!



                      Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Midge View Post
                        Thought of another one figure of eight, not sure if you lot use it on ships but you do sailing.

                        As for being towed using a bowline, I was never taught it being towed, but for use in an emergency, to secure yourself so you don't float away that kind of thing.
                        An old RN sea dog I know has a thing about it, I used to go out sailing with him.
                        Before you went anywhere you always had a 'lesson' in something. He did the 'show me a bowline' thing, I'd learnt it with the squirrel going round a tree etc. At the mention of the word squirrel I swear he blew a gasket, he went an odd colour, then insisted I learnt it one handed and behind my back, before he returned to a normal pink colour.

                        He was a mine of information and had an unforgiving character, and got very upset if he saw anyone with their legs out over a rail on any boat he saw.
                        I know it as a rabbit

                        Originally posted by alistairuk View Post
                        The point of the bowline being that you can tie it one hand if you fell in the water breaking one arm - and when they try and pull you back onboard, it doesn't tighten and cut you in half.
                        Fair enough. I was never taught and never taught that whilst dinghy sailing.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Midge View Post
                          Thought of another one figure of eight, not sure if you lot use it on ships but you do sailing.
                          Figure of Eight is used in climbing for tying into your harness. More secure knot than a bowline, as done correctly it doesn't come loose, although we teach climbers to tie a stopper knot on the free end to be doubly sure. Bowlines are more common in the US climbing scene, and there have been a couple of occasions where it has come undone at inopurtune moments!!

                          For use at sea the bowline has the big advantage that it can be tied single handed, whereas the figure of eight needs two hands (unless you are VERY flexible!!).

                          Oddly enough I tend to use climbing variations of knots at sea, as that is where I learned my basic knots. Causes bemusement/consternation with the A/B's and Bosuns who don't realise I know alternative methods of tying the same knots, then they bug me for days learning my methods!! I'll make climbers out of em yet!!

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                          • #14
                            All you need is a beastmaker on board thebrookster and you'll have them all climbing 9a!

                            Good to see another climber on the forum.

                            Sam

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                            • #15
                              [QUOTE=HarmlessWeasel;71077]I know it as a rabbit


                              Well we are both right rabbits, squirrels, even moray eels! Must have more squirrels where I am.

                              This knot is often called the "rabbit" knot, in which it tells the story of cute bunny going around a tree. Different geographic regions change the rabbit into another species that is more native to that particular area. So, this knot has also been called the gopher knot, the park squirrel knot, the moray eel knot, and now for the very first time, let us introduce the newest version: the Brown Tree Snake Knot!

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