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Working life style

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  • Working life style

    Hi,sorry but its me again.

    I read somewhere that newly qualified officer of the watch work 4 hours on 8 hours off, then repeat the cycle.
    Is this still true.
    And how does this change say when you become a 2nd officer, chief mate and master

  • #2
    Depends on the company but yeah, that's the standard whilst at sea. The same applies to second and chief mate, but you'll usually end up doing a couple of hours extra every day to complete your non watch jobs.

    The master does what needs to be done. It's a 24/7 job.

    At port it's often day shifts with the officers rotating the role of nightwatch. But, again, it depends on the company and situations. Sometimes third and second mate will do six on six off, with the chief working day.
    27//Officer Cadet//Phase Three//Warsash

    My officer cadet blog - SeasboundBySummer.Tumblr.com

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    • #3
      At sea:

      3rd Mate 8-12
      2nd Mate 12-4
      Mate 4-8

      rinse and repeat
      io parlo morse

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      • #4
        what do you means by day shifts, like a 9 to 5.

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        • #5
          does that mean third mate gets 12 hours rest in a 24 hour period, 2nd mate only 4 hours and chief officer 8. Or have i misinterpreted endure. And 2nd officer also get 12 off, but works less and mate gets the least time off because when the master is in his cabins he runs the ship

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          • #6
            The 3rd Mate does 8 in the morning to noon and 8 in the evening to midnight
            2nd Mate does midday to 1600 and midnight to 0400
            Mate does 1600 to 2000 and 0400 to 0800
            io parlo morse

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            • #7
              It depends very much on the company, ship type and operating area.

              Most cruise and deep-sea ships (Tankers, Larger container vessels etc) will usually do 4 hours on watch/duty followed by 8 hours off watch/duty, then another 4 hours on watch/duty and another 8 hours off watch/duty, in a 24 hour period.

              Offshore will do either 6 hours on, 6 hours off, 6 on, 6 off in a 24 hour period OR 12 hours on, 12 hours off in a 24 hour period. Harbour tugs vary, although one of the larger operators works 12 hours on, 12 hours off - With 7 days covering the night shift, 7 days covering the day shift, 7 days the night, 7 days the day etc etc.

              Some ships will also expect you to be on duty for mooring stations, cargo operations etc. You'll also have to attend drills, which (according to the law of the great Dr. Sodd) will always take place during your rest period...

              No matter what your shift pattern ends up being you'll be guaranteed 10 hours rest in any 24 hour period, which will be in no more than 2 "chunks", one of which will be at least 6 hours. You'll also get 77 hours of rest in any 7 day period.

              In future, try google https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deck_department
              Pointy bit is the front, blunt bit is the back... Simples!

              Will work for money/sea time.

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              • #8
                If you work on a ferry it'll be 12 hours on 12 hours off, for either 7 days on/off or 14days on/off. You'll work either days or nights (0600-1800/1800-0600). This is the watch pattern whether you're a cadet or a captain.

                If you are working 4 on 8 off there is sometimes a compulsory overtime on one of your 4 ons. So it can often work out as 4 on, 2 hours overtime, 6 off, 4 on, 8 off. This helps keep the ship maintained as otherwise the hours go far too in favour of rest rather than productivity... I've only heard of this from a few guys though.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by MuhammadTamimy View Post
                  what do you means by day shifts, like a 9 to 5.
                  More 8 to 5.

                  The impression I get from your posts is that your entering this expecting things to be set in stone. Different companies have different ways of doing things. Different ships have different ways of doing things. Heck, even life under differents captains on the same ship will differ slightly. It's good to have an idea about this stuff but when you get to sea, they will show you how things are done on their ship. That's the point of a cadetship, to learn both in the classroom and on the job. You're not expected to know everything straight away and, if I'm honest, you won't be doing yourself any favours going into this double guessing your tutors. Have a little faith, between the classroom and the seatime, you'll learn what you need to learn.

                  Looking through your previous posts, have you sorted sponsorship or a cadetship yet? Because if not you then this is way too early to be worrying about stuff like officers watch patterns.
                  27//Officer Cadet//Phase Three//Warsash

                  My officer cadet blog - SeasboundBySummer.Tumblr.com

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by agibbs98 View Post

                    If you are working 4 on 8 off there is sometimes a compulsory overtime on one of your 4 ons. So it can often work out as 4 on, 2 hours overtime, 6 off, 4 on, 8 off. This helps keep the ship maintained as otherwise the hours go far too in favour of rest rather than productivity... I've only heard of this from a few guys though.
                    That's what we were working.
                    27//Officer Cadet//Phase Three//Warsash

                    My officer cadet blog - SeasboundBySummer.Tumblr.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The problem is that i have only about 16 hours experience at sea, both my parents are doctors and convincing someone that i really want to join the merchant navy as a deck cadet, looks difficult atm. So i want to show them that i know what i am signing up for and am actually keen for a life at sea. Also what do officers mean when they talk about shifting to day working whilst at port

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MuhammadTamimy View Post
                        The problem is that i have only about 16 hours experience at sea, both my parents are doctors and convincing someone that i really want to join the merchant navy as a deck cadet, looks difficult atm. So i want to show them that i know what i am signing up for and am actually keen for a life at sea. Also what do officers mean when they talk about shifting to day working whilst at port
                        Like mentioned earlier in the thread, that they shift to an 0800-1700 work pattern when this ship is in port.
                        27//Officer Cadet//Phase Three//Warsash

                        My officer cadet blog - SeasboundBySummer.Tumblr.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          As a rule of thumb......
                          At sea 3 watches running 4 on 8 off. .....12-4, 4-8, 8-12 rinse and repeat forever........
                          Now ships need to come to town at this point things get complicated, but generally, you will do mooring stations (park the boat) no matter what time of day, once parked and cargo watches being thing change for a 3rd time (usually)
                          The 2 junior watch keepers may go 6-6 on-off OR you might all go day work and have a night watch officer who may or may not be required to be awake, at the very least they will be first contact should anything need doing. Day work is 8-17, ish.

                          Now on top of all that you will have to do extra hours to carry out other odds and ends of duty, maintenance on fire fighting gear, lifeboats etc.....but over ridding all of this are the Hours Of Rest regulations and STCW10, but fret not all this becomes clear as you get going.

                          Now as you are 16 it's obvious you're concerned and worried about making good impression etc, however, chill out, the recruiters know what they are doing and what they are looking for, some knowledge is useful, but like driving a car it's often better to start from nothing than correct bad habits and bad previous learning. Of more import is your enthusiasm general knowledge that this is not a 9-5 job or industry, it has its moment of blind terror and panic and considerably more moment of dull dull dull ....in fact dull is good, it means **** isn't falling down round your ears, you will come to appreciate periods of dullness (thigh not to often)

                          Watch some discovery channel mighty ships, and cruise thingy on it, they aren't real but they'll do to start from, hunt out the itv series about life at sea.....made by Scottish tv, there's cadets on there. Even that Dover series just on while I was on leave this time isn't aweful.

                          Be interested, be keen by all means but be confident and show you realise this is a lifestyle not "just a job"(tm), meanwhile please please please make use of our very expensive to run search function and highly informative articles, just about everything is covered, then also come ask questions cos some info has changed over the years. You'll be fine, honest.......as my signature says , trust me I'm a Chief
                          Trust me I'm a Chief.

                          Views expressed by me are mine and mine alone.
                          Yes I work for the big blue canoe company.
                          No I do not report things from here to them as they are quite able to come and read this stuff for themselves.


                          Twitter:- @DeeChief

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