Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Zodiac Sea Time Questions

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Zodiac Sea Time Questions

    Hi all, im am curious about my first sea phase, i was wondering if any of you could tell me when i should find out when i will be going to sea or what vessel im going to be on, my sea phase officially starts on the 28 of march, a few people in the PD side of the college that are also Zodiac have already found out, i am an NC Engineering cadet, i have been told by some of the third phase guys they had to wait over a month till they heard anything, any information would be appreciated. Also i want to know if any of you have trained with Zodiac and if you had good or bad experiences, i have also been told i probably wont be on a zodiac ship and will probably be on a maersk or china shipping operated ship?

  • #2
    Waiting around for berths is normal. A phone call every week or two pestering your training officer while you re waiting is normal. Most HNCs work with zodiac. Not heard amazing things but everyone's experiences are different.

    Comment


    • #3
      Everyone I've spoken to says they arent the most...comfortable...company but you will get some laughs, they will sign your TRB and get you qualified. Cant ask for much more really.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by jamieboy77 View Post
        Everyone I've spoken to says they arent the most...comfortable...company but you will get some laughs, they will sign your TRB and get you qualified. Cant ask for much more really.
        You could ask for a lot more, like a company who will not only ensure that your TRB is signed, but will also ensure that you are competent to act as officer of the watch.
        Go out, do stuff

        Comment


        • #5
          I finished my cadetship with zodiac last year and am now emloyed as a third engineer with the RFA.

          In my first sea phase I finished by college phase in July but was waiting until early October to get on a ship so its a waiting game unfortunately.

          I sailed on 3 container ships, two of them were sister ships and they all had the same engine so I had a good idea of what to expect from ship to ship.

          I had a good laugh on my ships most of the time, you get treated well by officers (mainly because they are afraid of you because they all think that we did reviews on them and sent them to head officer!). However the training was quite poor. They signed my TRB without checking my reports or if I even knew what the task was so its up to you to ask questions and read up because they will not chase after you to see if you know stuff. I'm currently at a stage were my knowledge is mainly theory based becuade of this so I can't wait to get onto my first ship and get stuck in.

          You'll mostly be cleaning and painting and people will come and get you if they need help with something. You might be given some responsibilities like boiler water treatment and incinerator operation.

          Good luck, just ask if you need to know something else.

          Oh, and the food was ****e.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Clanky View Post
            You could ask for a lot more, like a company who will not only ensure that your TRB is signed, but will also ensure that you are competent to act as officer of the watch.
            Sadly that is something which seems to be said all too often on this forum. There are countless times where the advice given is "don't worry who you are sponsored by all that matters is that you get your ticket"

            That just isn't true people should actually be thinking about the quality of training they will receive as cadets. It is companies like zodiac and clyde marine that eroding the quality and respect of British seafarers. British Officers are more expensive than those from other nations due to the cost of living and the nature of the various economies around the world. However the extra cost used to be justified by the higher standard of training they received meaning that companies were paying for a higher skilled, more competent, safer officer.

            Now that so many officers are being trained by officers from abroad who have a lesser level of English, some seriously questionable procedures and safety standards and very likely that some of them simply bought their tickets it is simply reducing the standard of british officers to the point where they no longer justify the higher cost to companies.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by gadget123 View Post
              Sadly that is something which seems to be said all too often on this forum. There are countless times where the advice given is "don't worry who you are sponsored by all that matters is that you get your ticket"

              That just isn't true people should actually be thinking about the quality of training they will receive as cadets. It is companies like zodiac and clyde marine that eroding the quality and respect of British seafarers. British Officers are more expensive than those from other nations due to the cost of living and the nature of the various economies around the world. However the extra cost used to be justified by the higher standard of training they received meaning that companies were paying for a higher skilled, more competent, safer officer.

              Now that so many officers are being trained by officers from abroad who have a lesser level of English, some seriously questionable procedures and safety standards and very likely that some of them simply bought their tickets it is simply reducing the standard of british officers to the point where they no longer justify the higher cost to companies.
              You've hit the nail on the head there. Might be the best post on the entire forum.

              Quite what can be done about this I'm not sure. Requiring companies to actually employ their cadets upon completion for a minimum period of time would be a start, although I suspect that this would result in a lot of companies flagging out and not bothering training UK cadets at all.

              Comment


              • #8
                They are indeed very good points, from my experience of just reading posts of course, but it makes sense.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Norway has set up a programme for cadet training in the Philippines.

                  http://ntcmanila.com/cadet-program.php?id=9
                  io parlo morse

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by EH75 View Post
                    You've hit the nail on the head there. Might be the best post on the entire forum.

                    Quite what can be done about this I'm not sure. Requiring companies to actually employ their cadets upon completion for a minimum period of time would be a start, although I suspect that this would result in a lot of companies flagging out and not bothering training UK cadets at all.
                    You are right, what to actually do about it is a tough one. Forcing companies with UK ships to hire UK officers would force them to flag out, I guess the only potential solution would to force the ships operating in and around the UK to be UK flagged but that would kill off nearly all of the deep sea shipping as the jones act has done in the states.

                    So I'm not sure what the solution is, companies being more transparent about the actual job opportunities and likely earning at the end of the cadetship would be a start.

                    Maybe the collage phases should have more of a ship management/broking/insurance/etc element to make newly qualified cadets more employable shoreside. Or maybe if companies don't want to employ brits on their ships they should be made to give them x number of paid weeks work experience in their UK offices. Some sort of spot checks on the quality of training onboard or some minimum qualification for the officers on board in charge of training cadets, being just about competent to do your job as a chief mate or second engineer does not make you an adequate trainer in a second language on a training scheme you do not understand, (not blaming this on the officers on board, its not their fault they are in that position just they are in)

                    Probably a lot of reasons why these ideas wouldn't work but there has to be some sort of change.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by gadget123 View Post
                      ...some seriously questionable procedures and safety standards and very likely that some of them simply bought their tickets it is simply reducing the standard of british officers to the point where they no longer justify the higher cost to companies.
                      You make some good points, but I don't believe the generalist xenophobic statement above is a good portrayal for those due to go on their first sea phase. Having a MCA CoC and having sailed with British Officers doesn't automatically place you at the top of the competency hierarchy - it can certainly help but ultimately I believe it comes down to the individual and not the maritime administration they trained under.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by newbie View Post
                        You make some good points, but I don't believe the generalist xenophobic statement above is a good portrayal for those due to go on their first sea phase. Having a MCA CoC and having sailed with British Officers doesn't automatically place you at the top of the competency hierarchy - it can certainly help but ultimately I believe it comes down to the individual and not the maritime administration they trained under.
                        I don't think its Xenophobic it from my first hand experience and from speaking to others sailing with similar companies.

                        I agree that having a British COC and sailing with British officers does not automatically make you the most competent but it certainly helps. Throughout my whole cadetship I only sailed on one ship with British officers, that was the only ship I ever did any form of drill on, the only ship I saw a rescue boat launched from, the only ship that ever used any form of permit to work system, the only time I saw any form of non GPS navigation.

                        Out of 12 months sea time 9 months was a lesson on how not to do things with everything else learnt in the other 3. And the majority of people I know had similar experiences.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by newbie View Post
                          You make some good points, but I don't believe the generalist xenophobic statement above is a good portrayal for those due to go on their first sea phase. Having a MCA CoC and having sailed with British Officers doesn't automatically place you at the top of the competency hierarchy - it can certainly help but ultimately I believe it comes down to the individual and not the maritime administration they trained under.
                          Nail, head, hit.....

                          I was a tonnage tax cadet with a company that had zero interest in employing me at the end and not a massive amount of interest in my training, so I do fully understand the position that the position that cadets in that kind of position are in. I also sailed as, usually, the only Brit on board with folks who's level of English ranged from the near native to the very very basic, none of whom had sailed with a UK cadet before and had utterly no idea as to how our system worked so, again, I know what that position is like. I also sailed with people of mixed abilities, from the near engineering gods (no, not Chiefy) to the muppets who gave me a rather nasty burn. Would I say that my training was poor or that I didn't emerge from the system, reasonably competent? Not at all, because I made the effort. Before I left college, I made sure that I knew exactly how my correspondence course worked because it would be very difficult to ask questions when I was on board and that meant that I was able to fully explain how my training program worked to anyone who wanted to know. When I was on board, I made the effort to learn a bit of the languages of the people I was sailing with to help with the communication aspects (I think I've still got my technical Romanian "dictionary" somewhere) and to ensure that I knew, roughly, what they were saying to me when they were asking me to do something and, to be honest, they also appreciated the effort. I do tend to hate this belief that unless you sail with British officers your training is going to be crap, well, I'm sorry, but some of the best training I had was from a Russian and a Croatian and I also did sail with British Officers (one of whom was actually able to cause a near destruction of the main engine) and even they had some practices that were concerning to say the least.

                          I can't answer for Deckies, but I know for Engineers it is slightly easier to get a job at the end of the cadetship because we can branch off into other areas. I lost count of how many O&G companies came down to see us to try and recruit us, but I know at least half of my intake went off to there for their own reasons. I also know that, roughly, within 6 months that we were all gainfully employed. I know I keep saying this, but a business does not exist to provide employment, it exists to make a profit and if a particular course of action is not financially viable then it's highly unlikely that they will do it. If legally forcing a company to hire UK cadets after training, either on board or ashore, is not financially viable, then they will reflag and move their offices somewhere else and having seen nationalisation quota's in other places in the past, I can tell you that it works about as well as a chocolate kettle.
                          I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

                          All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by gadget123 View Post
                            I don't think its Xenophobic it from my first hand experience and from speaking to others sailing with similar companies.
                            Point taken.

                            I just wanted to ensure that others reading these posts weren't unnecessarily prejudiced before having the experience of having sailed with non-UK nationals. I am certain that members of the forum will have more positive experiences of working with other nationalities than negative.

                            The UK now supplies less than 1% of the certified Officers working at sea, and while this is a disappointing statistic, it goes to prove that companies are able to satisfy 'first class' flag states, PSC, Class, Sire... Etc without the necessity of employing Brits. Thankfully my employer see the benefit of employing British Officers, Ratings and Cadets (otherwise I wouldn't have a job) even with the additional cost premium of doing so.

                            People will always will be more vocal of their negative experiences during their training, but of the 2000+ UK Cadets in training in the UK at the moment I do believe these are in the the great minority.

                            Without these so-called 'tonnage tax' companies (those that train but don't employ) there would be a significant number of qualified UK Officers who would never have obtained their CoC and be working at sea. Tonnage Tax has proven to be a great success, with UK Cadet numbers incrementally increasing each year until 2011 (combination of recession and our beloved Government reversed the trend) but hopefully the government review will identify measures to increase numbers without continuing the reduction in the UK register.

                            I do agree that more should be done to ensure training at sea is of a certain consistent standard - however this responsibility lies with the MCA (limited hope there then), and that something should be done to ensure we aren't training Cadets to then there being no jobs on qualification.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              OK who are you and what have you done with newbie?
                              Trust me I'm a Chief.

                              Views expressed by me are mine and mine alone.
                              Yes I work for the big blue canoe company.
                              No I do not report things from here to them as they are quite able to come and read this stuff for themselves.


                              Twitter:- @DeeChief

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X