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  • #31
    I'll check when I'm next in work and have access to the right books as I'm not sure now, but I know that our guys usually have either Chem or dual chem and oil.
    I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

    All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Steve View Post
      Because I have seen nothing from the MCA restricting the cargoes acceptable for issuing an oil tanker endorsement to 'black oils', or indeed any particular type of oil. My DCE and most of my colleagues' were issued on the basis of carrying exclusively MGO and AVCAT, neither of which I would have listed amongst 'black oils'.
      The types of endoresment are Oil, Gas, Chemical. See explanation for Chemical above from Pilot Chris on that endorsement.

      Oil - It makes no difference either Crude or Product. Both get you the DCE.
      Gas - Either LNG or LPG again there is no difference for the type.

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      • #33
        Thanks for the clarification guys. Sorry for starting an argument

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        • #34
          I will allow that the oil tanker safety course, and the tanker familiarisation course, does tend to focus on crude.

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          • #35
            I have to ask a similar question. Been told my next ship is the Navigator Galaxy, LPG ship carrying ammonia. So is ammonia gas or chemical?

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            • #36
              i have a few more general questions about tankers.


              What are the major differences between white/black oil, chemical, LPG and LNG:
              1)When it comes to your work as an officer? Different jobs, more in depth cargo environment calculation etc?
              2)technology wise(i heard that LNG has more advanced equipment in general)
              3)salary wise
              4)Smell wise?(I just heard someone saying that during midday they open something that makes the entire ship smell incredibly bad to the point he felt sick, is it true?)

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              • #37
                In terms of an officer, not that big a difference I wouldn't have though. Segregation, pipeline layouts, and a few pumps. Often an Inert Gas thrown in as well. Obviously there are differences between products, but a lot less than the difference of moving to a bulk carrier or Containor vessel!! Can't say much more than that, being as I am an Engineer, so for more detail you'll need to wait for a deckie to pop along.

                Technology - differs between types of tanker really. For instance, Crude carriers will often have 2 or 3 big pumps, driven either by electric motor (often HV), steam turbine or sometimes by an engine. Their purpose is simply to move large quantities as quickly as possible. Crude carriers will likely only have three manifold connections as well (well, 6 as you would have three on each side). Depending on the design of these and the pipe layout youmay find the ship can carry three seperate cargoes, or may only be able to carry one.

                Product/Chemical tankers however are more likely to have hydraulic pumps such as a Framo system, and the design will be such that you can carry multiple cargoes, and often discharge multiple cargoes simultaneously with full segregation. A bit more complicated for the deck officer in charge, he has more to think about.

                LPG/LNG - I have absolutely no idea about these!!

                Salary - I don't know about Product/Chemical, (I have sailed on this type of ship, but it was being used as a Shuttle tanker). Oil however normally commands decent salaries in comparison to other trades, for instance out of 10 or so of my classmates I am one of the higher paid guys out of us, the LNG guy is similar to me, and offshore work seems to match as well.

                The smell?? Probably the inert gas, depending on how the ship operates. Some Captains insist on a certain pressure in the tanks at all times, which means when the cargo cools overnight and the pressure drops then inert gas has to be added in the morning. However then when the cargo heats up during the day excess gas is pushed out, which will be what he can smell. Something you have to live with, though this can depend on the the Captain. On my last ship they were slightly more relaxed, where so long the O2 reading was correct, and the tanks were in positive pressure they were happy, and we only topped up once it looked like we would go into negative pressure, which would have been every few days or sao, but again depending on where we were.

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                • #38
                  I'm a newly qualified OOW with over 8 months on LPG as Cadet & over 3 months on Chemical tankers as cadet.
                  From what I'm told I need the Advanced Tanker training to work on LPG tankers.
                  So would this mean I have to do; Tanker firefighting, Tanker training basic (combined)& Tanker training Advanced (Gas) for Gas DCE?

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Mr Morse View Post
                    I'm a newly qualified OOW with over 8 months on LPG as Cadet & over 3 months on Chemical tankers as cadet.
                    From what I'm told I need the Advanced Tanker training to work on LPG tankers.
                    So would this mean I have to do; Tanker firefighting, Tanker training basic (combined)& Tanker training Advanced (Gas) for Gas DCE?
                    It depends on what training courses you also completed during your cadetship. MSN1866 has all the information you need.


                    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
                    If you can't laugh, you shouldn't have joined!!

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                    • #40
                      As a cadet starting in September 2016, I'll be doing a Tanker-Familiarisation course in December. Any chance of a run-down of the content, what to expect and what 'work' is involved?

                      Cheers!
                      "We have encountered an enemy square! The most deadly of all the quadrilaterals!" ~ EfffingController
                      First of all, I'm not Scottish! I'm Drunk!

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                      • #41
                        Three days of death by powerpoint ��
                        Unlimited Class III/1 Engineer Officer of the Watch

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Lmj266 View Post
                          Three days of death by powerpoint ��
                          Sounds thrilling!
                          "We have encountered an enemy square! The most deadly of all the quadrilaterals!" ~ EfffingController
                          First of all, I'm not Scottish! I'm Drunk!

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                          • #43
                            We were told that Tanker Fam at Fleetwood used to be a 5 day course, but instead we were treated to 3 hour lectures once or twice a week for a few weeks. I don't know why it changed, but formats may vary from college to college. The full Tanker Fam of course involves Tanker Fire Fighting as well, which for us was a day at the fire ground.

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                            • #44
                              In terms of engine room and machinery what are main differences between a tanker and say a box boat? On a smallish product tanker what type of engine is it likely to be, (2/4 stroke?)

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                              • #45
                                Assuming a liquid tanker, the biggest difference that I can think of off the top of my head would be that you will have the parts of the cargo handling and safety systems (including the IG plant) within the engine room and that on the larger tankers the steam system may well be a bit more extensive than what would be traditionally found on a box boat.

                                Again, it all comes down to the tanker type, as on the Aframax and upwards you're likely to find that the cargo pump turbines are in the engine room and run off steam whereas on the smaller tankers they may well have deepwell pumps / FRAMO system in use. A lot of it comes down to the type of tanker and what it has been designed to carry as I've seen quite a range of different configurations.

                                When you say smallish, how small we talking?
                                I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

                                All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

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