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  • TRB query

    Hi

    I'm in the second phase & sponsored by an offshore company with short trips around 4 or 6 weeks and i have been struggling with TRB reports. When i get familiarisation tasks, draw ship and ship particulars done its like half way through the trip and with only one day a week for rest/study/trb its kinda hard to put in the time.
    I feel pretty fatigued at the moment.

    My question is;

    Is it normal to concentrate on signatures at sea and maybe some pictures of the tasks and then use the time back home to get a good amount of reports done using books and manuals and drawings from ships computers?

    Thanks

    Sent from my CLT-L09 using Tapatalk


  • #2
    I spent my time on PSV, doing shortish trips of about 8 weeks. I mainly got signatures on board and managed to write a fair few reports. However, I also did plan quite a few reports on board and them write them when I was I leave. I also took anything of use from the ship's computer for future use.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the feedback

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      • #4
        I only wrote very basic reports during phase two and almost all of them got cannabilised and worked into more thorough, comprehensive reports during phase four. If I was you I'd focus on signatures and getting the AB / Deck work side of things sorted.

        During my phase two review hardly anything was said about the work book and it was pretty much all TRB.
        27//Officer Cadet//Phase Three//Warsash

        My officer cadet blog - SeasboundBySummer.Tumblr.com

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        • #5
          As an ETO cadet I'd suggest your experience is going to be different from the above who appear to be deck.

          As engineer cadets we were explained that the TRB is your checklist, the tasks are to be complete and the reports are to be written on each task to prove you've done the task. Each written report was to be signed by the officer that signed off the task, this was then checked by the training officer from the company and the MCA examiner in the orals. The examiner in the orals reads your reports just before, or during, and questions you from them. He'll also cross reference the reports are signed by a qualified officer who has his specimen signature in your TRB, which is proof of validity. If we didn't sign reports there is nothing to say that it was even from the ship we sailed on, rather than a mate's ship. So basically we had to write reports onboard relating to each TRB task, explaining what you did and why you did it, this was then countersigned after being read by a technical officer to ensure it's correct. Most of us had 30-50 odd reports signed by our officers, and maybe 10 reports not signed for whatever reason.

          You should ask for more time off if you're fatigued, it signifies you're either overworking or undersleeping and is dangerous for you regardless!

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          • #6
            Thanks for your feedback

            Sent from my CLT-L09 using Tapatalk

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            • #7
              Originally posted by agibbs98 View Post
              As an ETO cadet I'd suggest your experience is going to be different from the above who appear to be deck.

              As engineer cadets we were explained that the TRB is your checklist, the tasks are to be complete and the reports are to be written on each task to prove you've done the task. Each written report was to be signed by the officer that signed off the task, this was then checked by the training officer from the company and the MCA examiner in the orals. The examiner in the orals reads your reports just before, or during, and questions you from them. He'll also cross reference the reports are signed by a qualified officer who has his specimen signature in your TRB, which is proof of validity. If we didn't sign reports there is nothing to say that it was even from the ship we sailed on, rather than a mate's ship. So basically we had to write reports onboard relating to each TRB task, explaining what you did and why you did it, this was then countersigned after being read by a technical officer to ensure it's correct. Most of us had 30-50 odd reports signed by our officers, and maybe 10 reports not signed for whatever reason.

              You should ask for more time off if you're fatigued, it signifies you're either overworking or undersleeping and is dangerous for you regardless!
              Previous ETO cadet here.

              I disagree, very few people in my class got their reports countersigned nor did the cadet I recently worked with. My workbook was not in the format of one report per signature, rather a more general work and project record.

              Not saying it isn't best practice to get counter signed reports but I wouldn't say it's a priority especially if your fatigued.

              Cheers.

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              • #8
                Yeah when was I was a cadet (deck) I didn't do a report for everything I got a signature for, just things I thought were relevant. I didn't get everything signed, but I did get the front cover of my workbooks stamped and signed by the DSTO on each ship I was on. After all of this, the examiner never even looked at it! Probably just as well as it was a bit crap on reflection having since seen some of the work that some of our current cadets put in! This is one of the problems with this, the guidance is pretty vague from what I remember.

                Just do whatever works best for you, as long as you have a decent amount of reports to show for it at the end that's the main thing. How or where you actually write them doesn't matter too much.

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                • #9
                  Times must have changed for the better then, that or engine gets the rough end of the stick.

                  I think fatigue is the most important issue here, focus on getting yourself into a better state for a while. I found my sea trips tiring as a cadet as the nature of the lifestyle was so different to me. I’m now a seasoned pro at these kind of work hours and I find 12 hour shifts no longer bother me. You’ll crack it eventually. Just try enjoy yourself and learn as much as you can. If you want to take notes for future reports I recommend recording your voice talking about the job when you’re finished, you can get tonnes of detail in whilst it’s fresh in your mind.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks guys for all the feedback its much appreciated

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                    • #11
                      This is what I did mate! If you’d like a few examples message me and I’ll email mine over! Try your best to get some nav calculations in your workbooks though! I had captain legget for my orals and he loved the calculations apparently most people don’t put any in anymore! Keep a little diary just note down key things so when it comes to typing up your reports you don’t forget key aspects

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