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What engineering stuff do you learn exactly? (Practical and theoretically)

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  • What engineering stuff do you learn exactly? (Practical and theoretically)

    Hi All,

    I'm hoping some fellow engineers can shine alight on exactly what practical and theoretic stuff do you learn. I aware that there are different phases, but i'm struggling to find the gritty details of what you actually learn. I ask because i've completed a four year apprenticeship in engineering, where I have done some milling, turning, fitting, drawing(CAD). Theoretically, i've done maths, sciences, mechanical components, materials, design. However due the nature of my company, we don't do much machining, fabrication and unfortunately out work is tied up to great precision and tolerances. I'm hoping to start a cadet-ship to get stuck in to some proper engineering! Can anyone provide some detail on what they've learnt?

    Thanks

    Dan

  • #2
    (Deckie here and former machinist, but I have a rough idea)

    Remember - as an officer, you're not just doing engineering, but managing it. The following is a list that I found in some paperwork I had lying around, I hope it's helpful.

    Year One

    • Engineering Watch-keeping 1 practicum Year 1
    • Electrical and electronic control systems operation (Practicum year 1)
    • Marine Engineering Maths
    • Mechanical Technology 1
    • Thermodynamics
    • STCW basic safety training Basic Sea Survival
    • STCW basic safety training Basic Fire Fighting
    • STCW basic safety training Basic First Aid
    • STCW basic safety training Personal Safety and Social Responsibilities
    • Proficiency in Security Awareness

    Year Two

    • Engineering Watch-keeping 1
    • Engineering Watch-keeping 1 practicum Year 2
    • Electrical and electronic control systems operation
    • Electrical and electronic control systems operation (Practicum
      year 2)
    • Electrical and electronic control systems maintenance and repair 1
    • Technical design communications
    • Electrical and electronic maintenance practicum year 2
    • Main and auxiliary machinery 1
    • Main and auxiliary machinery 1 (Practicum year 2)
    • Fuel, lubrication, ballast and other pumping systems
    • Fuel, lubrication, ballast and other pumping systems (Practicum year 2)
    • Ship stability and stress for marine engineers
    • Ship Construction
    • Stability and structure practicum Year 2
    • Maintenance and repair of shipboard machinery and equipment part A
    • Maintenance and repair of shipboard machinery and equipment part B
    • Maintenance and repair of shipboard machinery and equipment practicum year 2

    Optional Courses
    • Basic Oil and Chemicals
    • High Voltage at Operational Level

    Year Three

    • Orals preparation
    • Human Elements Leadership and Management (H.E.L.M.)
    • Main and auxiliary machinery 2
    • Electrical and electronic control systems operation (Practicum year 3)
    • Electrical and electronic control systems maintenance and repair 2
    • Electrical and electronic maintenance practicum year 3
    • Main and auxiliary machinery 1 (Practicum year 3)
    • Fuel, lubrication, ballast and other pumping systems (Practicum year 3)
    • Stability and structure practicum Year 3
    • Maintenance and repair of shipboard machinery and equipment practicum year 3
    • Pollution Prevention and Maritime Legislation
    • Advanced firefighting
    • Proficiency in survival craft (PISC)
    • Medical First Aid

    Optional Courses
    • Crisis Management and Human Behaviour
    • Marine Dangerous Goods
    "Things work out best for those who make the best of how things work out" ~ John Wooden

    Deck Cadet on Product Tankers.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for that! Quite a diverse course, hopefully a lot of practical as well, I miss getting my hands dirty

      Out of interest what made you do for deck if you have an engineering background?

      Comment


      • #4
        The above covers the college course, for the practical stuff if your already good with a lathe, handfile and welder you wont learn many new skills there is a bit of opening up machinery in the workshop and having a look putting it back right etc and then that is really what the time at sea builds on with the added bit of having to complete a log and make sure that everything is happy every 3 days when its your duty.

        As for how much work you do after it really depends on what company you work for and as a 4th engineer the chiefs attitude too. some things like purifiers you will be pulling apart regularly enough that in time it wont seem like a fun job. also if the ship carries a fitter then welding /turning and stuff is really his job. that all said we've had to change all the small end bearings on the ME a section of cam shaft (different engine) and a few other jobs that are major work we have carried it out ourselves but you could just as easily find you end up with a shore party on to do it.
        you can take it with a pinch of salt, but i prefer it with a nip of whisky

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