Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Getting a position as a Deck Cadet (Cruise Ships)?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • shakey jake
    replied
    Re: Getting a position as a Deck Cadet (Cruise Ships)?

    Originally posted by CharlieDelta
    Hi Lewis,

    First of all, welcome!

    Second, don't be too set on Carnival - remember that Carnival, Princess, and Viking all recruit solely for cruise, while SSTG and Clyde have some cruise companies in their portfolios. The crusing side of the MN is a very popular choice and as such these companies get many applications each year, and there are many who don't get past the application stage.

    The application and interview process varies by company, and you'll find that not many are willing to go into the intimate details of what's involved, but in a lot of cases there's aptitude tests, maths tests, group exercises and a personal interview.

    Few questions for you:

    - Have you been to any open days?
    - Do you have a part time job?
    - Do you have any experience of being at sea?
    - Do you have any connections with the merchant navy?
    - Are you dead set on cruises or would you consider the "business end" of the merchant navy, i.e. container ships, tankers, support vessels etc?

    Again, welcome, you'll find there's lots of people on here who are more than willing to help!

    CD
    hello, what did the maths tests involve?

    Leave a comment:


  • rennells
    replied
    Re: Getting a position as a Deck Cadet (Cruise Ships)?

    Hi again Lewis,

    here are some of the questions I was asked at interview:

    1. What is your understanding of the Merchant Navy?

    2. Why do you want to join the Merchant Navy?

    3. In what ways are you suited to the role of Deck Officer?

    4. What difficulties do you think you might face, and how would you overcome them?

    5. How would you cope with being away from home for long periods of time?

    6. How would you feel about having superior officers who are younger than you?

    7. How would you cope with the little money you?ll be paid as a cadet?

    8. Why do you want to work on a cruise ship instead of a non-passenger vessel?

    9. What qualities do you possess that make you suited to working on a cruise ship?

    10. What do you think makes a good Deck Officer on a cruise ship?

    11. Are you aware of any differences between working on a cruise ship and working on a container ship?

    12. What do you know about the sponsorship package?


    Hope that helps

    Leave a comment:


  • alistairuk
    replied
    Re: Getting a position as a Deck Cadet (Cruise Ships)?

    Originally posted by Lewisscott22
    There is however extra support? As in extra classes sometimes and someone to call up if you are not sure about something?
    You can always go ask one of the lecturers if you are stuck, or ask your fellow course mates.

    The Oral Exam, If you fail for what ever reason will they tell you what you did wrong? And is it possible to resit it?
    The oral exam is with the MCA (you attend it at either their offices in Southampton, Glasgow, Liverpool or somewhere in Wales) - you can resit it as many times as you like, though its not cheap - it is quite common for people to fail it first time round, most of the time its just bad luck - depends on what examiner you get and what questions they choose to ask you.

    "some topics which are pretty much instant failures" What topics are they?
    Rule of the Road and anything to do with distress.

    Has anyone dropped out of they course? or failed an exam?
    Of my group around 70 of us started the course, over 50 ish finished - most dropped out for various reasons during the first sea phase or second college phase.

    Failing the college exams isn't really a big issue - you just resit them at the next resit period (but it can result in you missing time at sea - or delaying your ability to get your licence).

    Leave a comment:


  • Lewisscott22
    replied
    Re: Getting a position as a Deck Cadet (Cruise Ships)?

    There is however extra support? As in extra classes sometimes and someone to call up if you are not sure about something?

    I am taking a Higher Computing course this year that is involves a lot of self study so I will see how that goes, we only go to see the tutor once a month, is it kind of like this?

    The Oral Exam, If you fail for what ever reason will they tell you what you did wrong? And is it possible to resit it?

    "some topics which are pretty much instant failures" What topics are they?

    No, I don't really plan on getting drunk every night. I am committed and will give up free time in order to put myself in a good position.

    Has anyone dropped out of they course? or failed an exam?

    Leave a comment:


  • alistairuk
    replied
    Re: Getting a position as a Deck Cadet (Cruise Ships)?

    Originally posted by Lewisscott22
    Now here is a question I forgot to ask you guys. On a scale of 1-10 how difficult would you say your highers/A levels were? And then again on a scale of 1-10 how difficult would you say the HND/FD course?
    I didn't find the foundation degree course particularly hard, but it is something you do have to spend the time studying. If you only goto the lectures and do absolutely none of your own studying or reading you aren't going to pass.

    As you are direct from school, its possibly a bit harder (I came from university so was already used to the way these things are taught) - the foundation course is a lot less "teaching hours" when compared to the HND. You will for example generally only have a few hours of lecture time on a particular subject with the onus being upon you to learn the stuff in your own time - no one at the college will push you to do the work, if you don't do the homework they set, they wont care - but you're not likely to pass. Having said that, the HND is not easy as the content is still the same, its just taught slightly different. The pass mark is also different from university where traditionally its 40%. On foundation degree you need either 60% or 65% depending upon whether the subject is navigation or operational.

    There is a lot of stuff you need to know and learn on a wide variety of topics ranging from safety to maintenance to navigation and it all fits in with each other. The final final exam you sit will be with the MCA, its an Oral exam (interview) which lasts for anywhere between 30 minutes to 1 hour 20 minutes where they will ask you various questions on pretty much anything you should be expected to know - whether you pass or not depends on whether the examiner is satisfied you know what you are doing (although their are some topics which are pretty much instant failures).

    Also coupled with the fact that it is most peoples first time away from home, the onus is on you to be responsible - ie: don't go out and get drunk every night, rather than doing work!

    Leave a comment:


  • Lewisscott22
    replied
    Re: Getting a position as a Deck Cadet (Cruise Ships)?

    Originally posted by nemo
    On a scale of 1-10, how easy do you think that question is to answer? =P
    I know its not the best of questions and that everyone will give different answers, but like i said just so I can get an idea of what its like compared to high school.

    Leave a comment:


  • dawg
    replied
    Re: Getting a position as a Deck Cadet (Cruise Ships)?

    On a scale of 1-10, how easy do you think that question is to answer? =P

    Leave a comment:


  • Lewisscott22
    replied
    Re: Getting a position as a Deck Cadet (Cruise Ships)?

    Right, I think I will wait for my results then because I doubt I will get a position at the moment.

    Now here is a question I forgot to ask you guys. On a scale of 1-10 how difficult would you say your highers/A levels were? And then again on a scale of 1-10 how difficult would you say the HND/FD course?

    Just so I can get a rough idea.

    Thanks in advance.

    Leave a comment:


  • alistairuk
    replied
    Re: Getting a position as a Deck Cadet (Cruise Ships)?

    You have most likely missed the recruitment for this september/october intake... although you might get lucky if someone has pulled out - so if it is this years intake you want to apply for, there is no harm sending your CV off now - although if they offer you anything it will be provisional on the basis you meet their requirements in August.

    If you are applying for January / next year you are as well waiting until after you receive your results, since they wont start looking at them until after this years have started.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lewisscott22
    replied
    Re: Getting a position as a Deck Cadet (Cruise Ships)?

    Guys I know you say that the Cruise Companies want highers, but would it be ok if I apply for some of them now? I do not get my higher results until the 5th of August.

    Leave a comment:


  • CharlieDelta
    replied
    Re: Getting a position as a Deck Cadet (Cruise Ships)?

    Ahhh I see

    Leave a comment:


  • Randomist
    replied
    Re: Getting a position as a Deck Cadet (Cruise Ships)?

    yeah, it is. I was attempting to protect some annonimity by not naming a college =]

    Leave a comment:


  • CharlieDelta
    replied
    Re: Getting a position as a Deck Cadet (Cruise Ships)?

    Originally posted by Randomist
    ...the centres I've been to...
    Is the PSCRB not done as part of the cadetship at college?

    Leave a comment:


  • Randomist
    replied
    Re: Getting a position as a Deck Cadet (Cruise Ships)?

    Yeah, I know some people do the course before they get the sea time. For some reason, the centres I've been to have insited on 6 months seatime before I took the course

    Leave a comment:


  • Malim Sahib
    replied
    Re: Getting a position as a Deck Cadet (Cruise Ships)?

    You can actually do your CPSC (I presume that's what is now called PSCRB) before you actually go to sea, the same with your EDH (Efficient Deck hand) ticket. Once you've completed the required 6 months seatime your certificates can then be issued.
    Until a few years ago it was preferable that you did these courses before going to sea, the idea being that it'll give you a better grounding in what's going on once you get there.
    However these courses together with the Advanced Fire Fighting course have now been shifted to the tail end of many cadetships because of the problem of people dropping out after their first trip to sea, hence the money is wasted.
    This is despite the fact that in real terms these courses don't actually cost the companies concerned any money due to the tax breaks they receive for training cadets and Government funded grants!

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X