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  • Hard Engineering Work

    This probably sounds like a crazy question, but which sectors in this industry are the hardest as an engineer.

    I'm talking things like heavy\dirty work, rough sea, etc.

  • #2
    ermmmm? For real?

    Hmmm well all engineers get dirty, it'll depend on the engine size and type and age. Been on old ships where we never opened anything and new ships where we have opened everything....or had it self open!!!!

    Rough weather I would suggest the North Sea is pretty much the winner, but then it's all relative, a long low swell can make a big box boat or tanker feel like it is rolling it's guts out and a smaller ship in the same sea will just bob up and down and be left wondring what is wrong with it's bog old cousin, similarlly a short deep chop will kick the ass out of a small boat while the big boys just magestically cruise on through rather than going up hill and down dale over every damn lump.

    It's all relative.

    Same as how dirty you get, if you get ripped in you'll get mucky if you dont you wont
    Trust me I'm a Chief.

    Views expressed by me are mine and mine alone.
    Yes I work for the big blue canoe company.
    No I do not report things from here to them as they are quite able to come and read this stuff for themselves.


    Twitter:- @DeeChief

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    • #3
      As above, I would say that as an engineer you are least likely to be involved in heavy / dirty work on passenger ships as there are usually lots of fitters around for that kind of stuff, but even then the officers pitch in too sometimes. In general, older ships have more heavy / dirty jobs going on on a routine basis.

      Are you looking to fimnd a job with as much heavy / hands on engineering as possible or looking to avoid it?

      In terms of weather offshore can be pretty bad, I have just had 4 weeks of rolling my guts out off the coast of Vietnam, but the last couple of weeks have been like floating on a mill pond.
      Go out, do stuff

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      • #4
        Thanks Chiefy & Clanky.

        Originally posted by Clanky View Post

        Are you looking to fimnd a job with as much heavy / hands on engineering as possible or looking to avoid it?
        I want to work in that sort of thing.

        It seems North sea offshore is the winner then. Definitely not passenger ships.

        On smaller boats, would the actual engineering be less complex?

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        • #5
          size does NOT equal simplicity.......

          Actully bigger boats are arguabley simpler....big box boats have all the basics, main engine, generators, waste heat recovery (possibly), air con, sewage etc etc but non of the off shore kit, which is extra pumps for cargo ops, extra compressors (ditto) winches for anchor handing and towing and the likes.

          Technology is normal based on age, new ships have many more shiny buttons and whiz bang control systems (****e as you ask) older ones either have very little OR have switched it off and made stuff work manually

          Touch screens in an engine room are a night mare and in my last new build report I went to great paints to point out that touch screens, heat and engineers is a perfect storm
          Trust me I'm a Chief.

          Views expressed by me are mine and mine alone.
          Yes I work for the big blue canoe company.
          No I do not report things from here to them as they are quite able to come and read this stuff for themselves.


          Twitter:- @DeeChief

          Comment


          • #6
            Very interesting reading. Thanks Chiefy.

            After reading everything on this thread, it all sounds perfect.

            Comment


            • #7
              How hard is it to get into North Sea offshore?

              Are there a lot companies taking on cadets and are a lot of people applying compared to other sectors?

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              • #8
                in some respects just get trained first and a couple of trips then look to move, unless you can get a cadetship with the off shore companies.....
                Trust me I'm a Chief.

                Views expressed by me are mine and mine alone.
                Yes I work for the big blue canoe company.
                No I do not report things from here to them as they are quite able to come and read this stuff for themselves.


                Twitter:- @DeeChief

                Comment


                • #9
                  SSTG have a good few offshore companies that usually take on a good few cadets each year, most of the SSTG cadets I know are offshore, best company seem like North Star for a cadet ship as halls are paid for and pay increase each year and help the cadets as much as possible.

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