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Shore leave on different type of boats

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  • Shore leave on different type of boats

    Hi, from reading some of the threads so far it has became apparent that you get longer and more shore leave on cruise ships opposed to cargo/ bulk ships ect. My question is how much shore leave do you usualy get for each type of boat company and which type of boats/ boat company's go where?

  • #2
    This is very dependant to be honest. On heavylift ships we could be in port for upto a week at a time, often not working nights or weekends, and always somewhere different (no set schedules), so I'd consider that I had some of the most interesting shore leave on those vessels. On the cruise ships you tend to visit places several times, and if you get on worldcruises or the more interesting voyages you get overnights in places, so you can often manage to negotiate a few hours off in the different places, but little more then that. On superyachts, when the owners are onboard you rarely get to go ashore (often its not allowed), but when your waiting for the bosses orders, you get to sit around for days on end in some of the coolest places in the world working mon-fri 8-5, although those places are often damn expensive.
    Alternatively, certain ship types offer almost zero time ashore, but compensate in good salaries and good leave/work rotation, such as offshore vessels.

    Container ships and tankers, I believe get very little in the way of shore leave, but I'm sure someone more experienced in that field can answer that question.

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    • #3
      Cheers so it sounding like the company to go for is cruise ships but I can imagine everyone is going for them. By heavy ships would that be the likes of bulk ships or gas tankers?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jakestack96 View Post
        Cheers so it sounding like the company to go for is cruise ships but I can imagine everyone is going for them. By heavy ships would that be the likes of bulk ships or gas tankers?
        You read it wrong Jake....

        Heavylift ships are like this:

        http://www.motorship.com/__data/asse...ed-cropped.jpg

        Ian
        "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.
        "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

        "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

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        • #5
          Aww ok haha

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          • #6
            Cool ship! I always thought of these with heavy lift. http://www04.abb.com/global/seitp/se...ip+Channel.jpg This vessel looks a little prettier than Rickmers Antwerp, which I spent a couple of days on in port. Cargo ops were pretty cool. If I ever tire of tankers, I think heavy lift is next. They were in port for 2-7 days at a time with no cargo ops at night but the watches were still 6 on/off so shore leave was limited.

            As far as shore leave on chemical tankers goes, turn around times can be pretty short and we do a lot of berth hopping. There's not a lot of time to go ashore. Having said that, we once spent 5 days in Domincan Republic discharging a full cargo of palm oil into trucks. The 3/O and 2/O worked double shifts and so both got to have a decent trip ashore.

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            • #7
              For time off in port - anything that goes to Australia. Sooner rather than later the dockworkers will go on strike over something and then you get 10 days in Melbourne and 12 days in Sydney!

              No idea what the strike was over - who cared - but in the mid 80's on the Remuera Bay they were on a go slow over something, so we were loading one container an hour and were really badly delayed. Because everyone was so held up in Australia we got to New Zealand and every space on the terminals were taken up, so instead of 3 cranes working each ship we had one each! So instead of 1 day alongside we had 4 days in Wellington, Auckland and Port Chalmers!

              Because we were cadets we were told by the Chief Officer to bugger off ashore for a few days each time so long as we promised to work Sundays once back at sea! Of course we promised - but forgot later!

              Thank you Aussie Dock Workers. We had a blast!

              As a footnote after the strike was over they discovered that the straddle carriers did not like being in first gear for 16 hours a day so they all had knackered gearboxes and everyone spent extra time in port for about three months whilst they changed them all!

              Ian.
              "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.
              "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

              "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

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              • #8
                Haha thanks! and I guess alot of its your luck

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jakestack96 View Post
                  Cheers so it sounding like the company to go for is cruise ships but I can imagine everyone is going for them. By heavy ships would that be the likes of bulk ships or gas tankers?
                  Don't choose a cruise line purely to go ashore - yes as has been said, we are in port everyday, but you, like the rest of the crew and staff (except the shoppies - they do f-all) will be working and your opportunities to go ashore will be limited to once / twice a week for a few hours at most!

                  Basically my last trip, in 4 months I was ashore 8 or 9 times for between 2 - 5 hours. There is always something ruining your day, if its not work you can guarantee it will be a drill, crap weather or training!
                  ?Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn?t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.?

                  ? Mark Twain
                  myBlog | @alistairuk | flickr | youtube Views and opinions expressed are those of myself and not representative of any employer or other associated party.

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                  • #10
                    Do heavy lift ships require any specialist skills/knowledge? Sounds an interesting area.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Squareleg28 View Post
                      Do heavy lift ships require any specialist skills/knowledge? Sounds an interesting area.
                      Probably not for an ETO. Electrickery is electrickery?
                      "Crazy like wild wolves threatened by fire, send them all to the bottom of the sea."

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                      • #12
                        Offshore... spent two and a half months supply one winter as a cadet with only half a day ashore (and that?s only because the weather was beyond bad) and I got way land sick having came in out a storm, but then other trips mobilising (construction/ anchor handling) with weeks in port or ?off hire?doing nothing but maintenance really. Sometimes lots of shore leave, sometimes none.... saying that working down off West Africa at the moment, not a place you want to visit... anyway with Offshore it?s a real mixed bag depending where you are/ what you?re doing- tends to be really short port stays or really long but time off when you?re a mate does get more difficult. Saying tha had a lot of good nights ashore and long shore leaves in some pretty cool places- Norway, UK, the Med, Congo... might be twelve hours on but then twelve hours off as well!

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                        • #13
                          Phwoar

                          PHWOAAARRRR

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                          • #14
                            Cargo ops looks great on those ships. Just to repeat Squareleg's question, but from a deckie point of view. What extra training is required to work on heavy lift ships?

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                            • #15
                              Essentially there is no specialist course for them, but it takes time and a very innovative mind to work on them, because the cargoes and projects are so diverse and different. Work varies from offshore to being involved in recovering submarines (Kursk?) and sunken cruise ships (costa Concordia. I definitely enjoyed the projects I got involved in. The stability aspect during a lift and how the horizontal and vertical centre of gravity shifts at the different stages can take a while to get your head around and catches out the unwary. Essentially you pick up and land the lifts using stability.
                              I used to work for biglift/mammoet and really enjoyed the work. Sadly was made rendundent and replaced with a filipino, then they got travelling supercargos to fly around and load/discharge the ships and let the crew just drive from A to B

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