Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Becoming deck officer with hearing aids

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Becoming deck officer with hearing aids

    I use hearing aids (cochlear implant) on both ears and take them off whilst sleeping, so according to the guide to the doctors from MCA, I will only be able to get a Restricted Category 2 medical certificate, which means that the ship would have to be in port at night.

    As that pretty much only leaves channel ferries and CalMac is it worth bothering applying to become a deck officer or am I better off forgetting about this career?

    Sirius

  • #2
    Hi Siruis

    I would certainly give it a try if you are keen for a career in the MN but I would say that if you managed to get a cadetship the issue may arise of getting the required sea-time as often the ferry companies send their cadets on longer voyages to get their time up.

    I would not give up on the basis of other peoples thoughts if you are keen - but it will be one heck of a struggle for you and to be honest I can see a lot of safety issues with being a Deck / Engine Officer in your situation.

    Best of luck!
    Pilotage - It's just a controlled allision

    Comment


    • #3
      I would interpret that restriction in the context as meaning service only on vessels where the crew live ashore, which is not the case for short sea ferries, though it is the case for much of the Cal-Mac fleet, the likes of Red Funnel and Wightlink, etc. You might be able to look for work on harbour craft, smaller tugs, workboats, pilot launches, harbour and estuarine ferries, harbour or riverine cruises, that sort of thing. Probably not a cadetship though.

      How strict is the requirement to remove your hearing aids whilst sleeping?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Sirius View Post
        I use hearing aids (cochlear implant) on both ears and take them off whilst sleeping, so according to the guide to the doctors from MCA, I will only be able to get a Restricted Category 2 medical certificate, which means that the ship would have to be in port at night.

        As that pretty much only leaves channel ferries and CalMac is it worth bothering applying to become a deck officer or am I better off forgetting about this career?

        Sirius
        I think you are right. If you read the ADG13 guidance it clearly states a category 2.

        http://www.dft.gov.uk/mca/mcga07-hom...nce/adg_13.htm

        However, before you take any advice from any of us I would suggest you ring and speak to an approved MCA Doctor. Alternatively you may wish to contact the MCA direct. What I would not do is take advice from any of us, as none of us are MCA approved Doctors!

        Even ferries work through the night so are not classed as being in home port every night. So I am afraid that is out.

        Find out from a Doctor and then I would be tempted to ring a number of companies and ask them whether you would be able to apply for a cadetship, but do let us know the outcome.

        Good Luck,

        Ian
        "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.
        "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

        "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Steve View Post
          How strict is the requirement to remove your hearing aids whilst sleeping?
          It is not a requirement as such, more a practical matter as my hearing aids would fall off when I move around on the pillow and put the side of my head to the pillow

          Originally posted by Hatchorder View Post
          However, before you take any advice from any of us I would suggest you ring and speak to an approved MCA Doctor. Alternatively you may wish to contact the MCA direct. What I would not do is take advice from any of us, as none of us are MCA approved Doctors!
          By that I assume you mean contact a doctor (or MCA) and find out what their take is on becoming a cadet with a category 2 medical?

          Sirius

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Sirius View Post
            By that I assume you mean contact a doctor (or MCA) and find out what their take is on becoming a cadet with a category 2 medical?
            He means contact a doctor who is MCA approved to issue ENG1 medicals. Here is the link that will help you find your nearest MCA Doctor. A hearing test is part of the ENG1 so its best to see what they say. http://www.dft.gov.uk/mca/mcga07-hom...-docs-list.htm

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Sirius View Post
              It is not a requirement as such, more a practical matter as my hearing aids would fall off when I move around on the pillow and put the side of my head to the pillow
              The flow chart in ADG 13 that pushes you into category 2 is all about whether you can hear an alarm while you are asleep. If you can hear alarms without the hearing aid, or can sleep with a hearing aid in place, as far as I can see that would put you in category 1.

              By that I assume you mean contact a doctor (or MCA) and find out what their take is on becoming a cadet with a category 2 medical?
              The doctor won't know about becoming a cadet with a restricted ENG1. He will be able to comment on what restrictions he would apply, a more nuanced and practical understanding of the MCA guidance.

              Potential sponsoring companies would be able to comment on whether they would take a cadet with a restricted ENG1.

              Comment


              • #8
                So can you look into the possibility of different hearing aids which can be worn whilst your sleeping? If you are able to find some and then obtain an ENG1 at your own cost, you'd be in a position to be employed on any ship.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I am afraid I do have limited sympathy for people who cannot pass the ENG1. I know this will come across as a bit douchey, and that you probably want this career really badly, and I know how devastated I would have been if I had been unable to obtain one. But the fact is, a career at sea is dangerous. There are lots of things on a ship which are so eager to try and kill you, you really do need to be fit and have all your senses (not just common, but sight and hearing) about you. Cargo work especially. You often hear something, before you see it. And being down in a ballast tank, especially on an older ship, you have to be able to see all the dangers down there.

                  I personally think that they are too lenient on overweight people at the ENG1. I was on a ship with a cadet who could barely fit into the tank inspection hole, God knows what would have happened if there was an emergency down there and he had to get out in a hurry, or if something happened to him and we had to try and rescue him. It wouldn't of happened, he'd be dead.

                  So, whilst it may be heart-breaking, we have medicals for a reason, and it's to reduce risk of injury or loss of life. Your life.
                  Linkedin

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X