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  • Visa advice

    I'm in the middle of applying for my American visa and I could have a problem. I have checked online and as I was arrested for drunk and disorderly when I was 19/20 I have had to acquire an ACPO police certificate which I now have. It states No Trace of convictions cautions or reprimands. However I have rang the us embassy to book an appointment and they have told me that I could be ineligable for a visa. I have had to send over the police certificate and a vcu1 form and they will apparently get back to me within 5 days as to whether I can carry on with the application. In everyones experience what are the chances that they will deny me a visa ffor that? Cheers

  • #2
    Was you charged? I'd be interested as I received a warning under the SOCPA (Serious Organized Crimes Preventions Act) in 2007... I was involved with a protest outside the Houses of Parliament, I was read my rights and allowed on my way, a few months later I was written to saying that no further action would be taken against me. In 2009 I applied for an ACPO police certificate and it stated No Trace, I subsequently worked in Canada, however Canada and the US have completely different attitudes. I've so far taken the view that, as I was only cautioned and not charged, it's really not worth mentioning. However, I know the US tends to be considerably less lenient and can take a dim view to previous convictions regardless of severity or even if your own country deemed you worthy of punishment, which I somewhat biasedly disagree with.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ramfeild66 View Post
      Was you charged? I'd be interested as I received a warning under the SOCPA (Serious Organized Crimes Preventions Act) in 2007... I was involved with a protest outside the Houses of Parliament, I was read my rights and allowed on my way, a few months later I was written to saying that no further action would be taken against me. In 2009 I applied for an ACPO police certificate and it stated No Trace, I subsequently worked in Canada, however Canada and the US have completely different attitudes. I've so far taken the view that, as I was only cautioned and not charged, it's really not worth mentioning. However, I know the US tends to be considerably less lenient and can take a dim view to previous convictions regardless of severity or even if your own country deemed you worthy of punishment, which I somewhat biasedly disagree with.
      What did you do to get the caution?
      I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.....

      All posts here represent my own opinion and not that of my employer.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by chrisroberts View Post
        I'm in the middle of applying for my American visa and I could have a problem. I have checked online and as I was arrested for drunk and disorderly when I was 19/20 I have had to acquire an ACPO police certificate which I now have. It states No Trace of convictions cautions or reprimands. However I have rang the us embassy to book an appointment and they have told me that I could be ineligable for a visa. I have had to send over the police certificate and a vcu1 form and they will apparently get back to me within 5 days as to whether I can carry on with the application. In everyones experience what are the chances that they will deny me a visa ffor that? Cheers

        They did say you only 'could' be ineligible for a visa. Don't give up hope just yet.

        Since you weren't charged with anything and your ACPO states no trace of convictions then it may be fine.

        To boldly go.....
        Forum Administrator
        OfficerCadet.com

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        • #5
          Please don't be foolish enough to mention it when you've got a clear ACPO certificate. The US embassy can't find out about your arrest if your ACPO is clear. A friend of mine mentioned he got arrested for a drunken fight but with no charge, not even a caution, and he got barred from the US for life. Its up to you really, but their chances of finding out are slim.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by GuinnessMan View Post
            What did you do to get the caution?
            Participate in a protest outside the Houses of Parliament, nothing else. The point was that people should be allowed to protest in the space outside the Houses of Parliament as it is our home of democracy, but it was outlawed in 2007 under SOCPA. The police corralled about 20 of us, took our names and addresses and let us go. Bit of a pointless act of symbolism by both us and the police as no-one was charged with anything. I was a bit of a freedom fighter back then. If I'd actually done something other than stand there I'd have probably been nicked.

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