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ENG1: Vision

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  • ENG1: Vision

    Hi all,

    I have applied to the RFA to be an Engine Cadet. Only problem is that I cannot meet the 6/60 unaided vision requirements. I am fine with glasses on and am not colour blind. Will this be a fail on the ENG1 or will I just be restricted in what I can do in someway?

  • #2
    http://www.dft.gov.uk/mca/mcga-mnoti...9BEE27A2E4E640

    Seems that is the requirement sadly

    Comment


    • #3
      I thought if you need to wear glasses/contacts then they only test you with them on?

      Comment


      • #4
        No, as Thady says, there is a minimun unaided vision requirement for everyone. Sorry, but I think that you will not get through the test.
        "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.

        "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

        "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

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        • #5
          6/60 is the Biggest letter on the chat. Test if you can do this at home pin leter font size 200 pin it to wall. Measure 20 feet see if you can readi it from there. This 20/200 or 6/60 vision.

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          • #6
            might be an idea they dont actually do anything beyond cover a eye, whats the smallest you can read.

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            • #7
              Its going to be hard to self test with out knowing what it says, similarly a standard test sheet only has a few big characters so its hard to get a true indication of are you able to read them or just remember from before.
              The best thing is to either go to an ENG1 doctor or optomitrist and find out for sure. while to speculate and pay for an ENG was a bit of money if it allows you to do the cadetship then its ok. However speak to a professional who can tell you, is it likely to get worse? if so then theres not much point as you could finish and then never get another ENG
              you can take it with a pinch of salt, but i prefer it with a nip of whisky

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              • #8
                can you get laser eye surgery? yeah its expensive but if it allows you do to what you want in life maybe a acceptable sacrifice

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by thady View Post
                  can you get laser eye surgery? yeah its expensive but if it allows you do to what you want in life maybe a acceptable sacrifice
                  In ADG 14 there is a specific line about not being fit for sea as per the ENG1 for a period of 6 months after laser eye surgery.

                  "If a seafarer decides to undertake the procedure and returns for reassessment, the Standards require you to make them temporarily unfit for lookout duties for 6 months after surgery. On retesting, they can be issued with a short term unrestricted ENG 1 until stability is confirmed."

                  http://www.dft.gov.uk/mca/mcga07-hom...nce/adg_14.htm

                  As you do not mention your age then I will also have to say that some surgeons will not consider people under 21 and some under 25.

                  If you are prepared to wait, have eye surgery once your eyes have stabilised and then wait a further 6 months before having an ENG1 then I would say go for it. However, messing with your eyes if you are younger and tour eyes are still changing because a high street dodgy laser eye clinic says they will do it is not the best road to follow. If I were you I would go and make an appointment to see one of the top surgeons at the Moorfields eye hospital in London. These are the guys that pick up all the pieces when people are left in a mess by failed procedures. There is one guy in particular (contact me pm for his name) who did laser eye surgery for my wife 2 years ago to correct -7.25 in both eyes. He did say she would need a re-correction because her eyes were so bad, and he did say it would be 2 years before her eyes settled down and he could do the second correction. He has been spot on. Her 2 years is up later this year and her eyes are still changing. He refuses to be rushed or do anything that is not 100% right. Oh, and he is using one of the latest femtosecond lasers. Let him advise you, or someone like him. It is your eyesight you are playing with here. Not to be done lightly.

                  Good luck.

                  Ian
                  "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.

                  "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

                  "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks very much for the help everyone. I'm going to have a full eye test to confirm if I would pass or not. If not, then I'll look into laser eye surgery.

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                    • #11
                      never looked at it in that much detail, i know the airforce wont touch you if you have had it done in any flying duty, i have heard good things from people who have had it done but also stories about it going wrong. that was a interesting read. thanks

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                      • #12
                        Glad it helped thady.

                        My wife says it was the best thing she has done, and it will be even better once it is totally corrected. Moorfields is over £4,000 for both eyes, but worth every penny in my opinion compared to other high street operators.

                        It is very different from when I joined. We used to have to have 20/20 vision both eyes, no glasses, for deck officer. You had to have an Opthalmic Surgeons 10 year report and we had to have an eyesight test before our written finals to show we were still 20/20. One of the lads on my course failed and had to have glasses, a specialist eyesight test and a meeting with Board of Trade doctors before they would give him his ENG1 and let him take his orals! Once you were qualified you could have glasses, but I think, only to a certain level. I cannot remember what it was though.

                        Very different to today.
                        "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.

                        "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

                        "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Hatchorder View Post
                          In ADG 14 there is a specific line about not being fit for sea as per the ENG1 for a period of 6 months after laser eye surgery.

                          "If a seafarer decides to undertake the procedure and returns for reassessment, the Standards require you to make them temporarily unfit for lookout duties for 6 months after surgery. On retesting, they can be issued with a short term unrestricted ENG 1 until stability is confirmed."
                          "not fit for lookout duty" and not fit for sea are not the same.

                          As a potential engine cadet you can go to sea with a not fit for lookout duty restriction on your medical.

                          I would of course never recommend that you cheat at the eye test and have a quick look at the biggest letter on the chart before you cover your good eye.
                          Go out, do stuff

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Clanky View Post
                            "not fit for lookout duty" and not fit for sea are not the same.
                            You are absolutely right, my choice of words was too loose. Sorry.

                            Originally posted by Clanky View Post
                            I would of course never recommend that you cheat at the eye test and have a quick look at the biggest letter on the chart before you cover your good eye.
                            A bit like the film "Space Cowboys".

                            Providing of course they do not use the newer digital devices where you look into a screen and not at a chart? Then you are jiggered!

                            Ian
                            "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.

                            "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

                            "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

                            Comment

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