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Carnival UK Deck cadetship HND 2019 disappointment

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  • Carnival UK Deck cadetship HND 2019 disappointment

    Hello all, I am new to this forum so I will introduce myself.

    I am a Level 3 Pre-Cadetship student at South Shields Marine School in South Tyneside.

    I have recently received application form feedback regarding my application to Carnival UK.

    I passed the psychometric test online which I found to be challenging and then I did the Video interview.

    I don't know how I did not get through to be honest. I answered every question about skills etc and I also did a really good statement on my application form. With all my experience, I don't know why I didn't get it to be honest. I was really proud of getting that far. Maybe I just rushed into the interview quickly.

    I know I did not really dress up for the occasion .I was wearing a casual t shirt so could that be a factor of why they did not choose me. I was so passionate about it as well.

    So I am stuck with two options, to be with P&O Ferries for training or wait until January intake and apply for that.

    I have recently sent off my application form for Princess cruises in the post so hope to hear from that eventually. Maybe I should have prepared more for it etc?

    Like I said, onwards and upwards, but was looking forward to getting through if I did. What do you all suggest I do?

    Just for some advice. I want to be with either princess or carnival. Could it at all be about my age as I am still 17. But will turn 18 in November this year.



  • #2
    Your age won’t be a concern. I’m sorry to say your chances were almost definitely destroyed by wearing a t-shirt, I know it sounds silly but these Skype interviews with cruise companies are more than a casual chit chat. I don’t think the article about Skype interviews is available here anymore but I know the number 1 rule was dress smart like you would for any interview. For my Royal Caribbean qualified officer Skype interviews I wore a full suit, and sat in the tidiest part of my house.

    It’s obvious you’re wanting the cruise life but nearly everyone at your stage does, including me. A few companies will be put off by this attitude, especially Clyde and SSTG, as you have no guarantee of a cruise sponsor. It’s worth noting that although your cadetship may be fun (as anyone’s can be, in any company) upon qualifying you’ll be at the bottom of the pile for jobs as a cruise officer. Few like it enough/have the stamina to climb the ranks and make a career from it but many, including me, get sick of it fast. The pay is the lowest on the market, the trips can be the longest, the time off can be the deep sea shortest and life onboard is marred by politics. RCL was definitely an “if you’re Italian or Croatian we will promote you fast” cruise company, and for any good officer that is annoying. Just be mindful that you could be in for disappointment if you think that Cruises are not long hours, low thrills and low pay. Our cadets in RC had to pay to use all facilities onboard and after a week or two they had little stamina to go ashore after joining the watch structure.

    This brings me to my next point, valid to yourself. You have a chance to train with P&O who might sound underwhelming but they’re the only company that will support/fund you all the way to captain, whilst paying you above average (£42k for second officers, tax free), and giving you 1:1 leave ratio so you’re off as much as you’re on. I trained with P&O Ferries and many I know (deck, engine and electrical) have completed their cadetship, worked a year getting that valuable experience and secured themselves employment at Carnival, Royal Caribbean (like me), super yachts and New Zealand ferries... and most can come back to the ferries when they get bored, having that safety net of £43k and tiny trip lengths to suit them once they get bored of Cruises and have kids.

    So I hope that helps you see a bit why P&O Ferries might be your best of both, a class leading cadetship with opportunities to follow your dream when you’re qualified OR make captain within 15 years if you stick at P&O and are keen.

    But note your training will be crap wherever you go if you’re accepting your “second best”, if your heart is set on cruises you’ll potentially hate P&O Ferries and your officers may sense this and not provide you with the best support.

    Feel free to PM me any concerns or questions, I’m always happy to help and I’m only a few years away from having been in your exact situation.

    Good luck regardless, you’ll make it!

    Comment


    • #3
      First of all you are possibly right about the smartness aspect. Cruise ships are always the sticklers for it, both in looks and dress code. Wearing a T shirt was an absolute no-no, and you should have known that before you did the interview. Suit jacket, collar and tie were the order of the day really....

      But onwards and upwards.....

      I am always baffled why people want to work for less money and less leave to work with a cargo that moans, but different strokes for different folks.... If you have the opportunity to go with P&O I would seize it with both hands. You will probably get more responsibility earlier, have more fun without looking over your shoulder, have a better rotation on board and at the end of the cadetship P&O usually, and I emphasise usually, offer newly qualified officers at least one trip, providing they have proved themselves. If it is through SSTG then I have every respect for how they treat their cadets - providing those cadets work hard and use their common sense....

      If you are then desperate to take a pay cut and a leave cut then you can get onto cruise ships then. There are jobs being advertised a lot of the time.

      There is a kind of pecking order in terms of qualified jobs as far as I am concerned. By that I mean if you have tanker or gas training you can get a job on virtually anything, Crankers or cargo in the North Sea gives you possibilities that way providing you have a DP ticket. Next comes General Cargo, Ferries, Containers etc and then, in my opinion, comes Cruise. But that is only my opinion.

      So, is a bird in the hand worth.... I think so. Seize it and I would think you will not look back.

      But, as I said, this is only my opinion.

      Ian.
      "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.
      "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

      "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

      Comment


      • #4
        Looks like we were typing at the same time agibbs98.... LOL.

        But we both said the same thing!

        Ian.
        "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.
        "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

        "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

        Comment


        • #5
          Ha! Good job we agreed!

          Furthering your comment on P&O’s employment prospects: I am yet to see anybody who didn’t get a 6 month junior officer contract, I’m also yet to see somebody not have the 6 month contract upgraded to permanent (unless they left). Most of the remainders there are now studying or have obtained their higher tickets. Very valuable!

          Another good point is if you’re interested in the sexy girls/guys and paradise travelling for a job, you can get all of that with P&O Ferries in your off time... but you won’t be working whilst enjoying! Some guys I worked with were flying half way round the world every 2 weeks on holiday, enjoying their leave and (wasting their!) wages.

          Comment


          • #6
            So should I just go for P&O Ferries then. Still a bit dissapointed I didn't get through but the majority of cadets who have qualified with them have landed positions and progressed. I believe if I work hard and get amazing results in exams etc, I won't even think about failing my application for carnival. So glad I got that far, but was the preparation I put into it all to be honest.

            Waiting to hear still from princess as I hope THIS TIME, I don't make the same mistake again as I did.

            And yes, if I get into princess, I might even forget about wanting to leave but of course I could either reapply for carnival UK'' January intake or be with princes etc. I am sure I will have a blast with either company and chance of a position at the end I will work for and show to them by attaining well in college work etc.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Sampower2001 View Post
              the majority of cadets who have qualified with them have landed positions and progressed.
              Are you talking about Carnival/Cruises there? If so, I’d be wary of whoever has told you that. Of the 20 odd Carnival cadets I’ve known, none are working on cruise ships now. Most were offered jobs but hated it eventually, some left at the end of college as they already hated it. Their current job prospects are a little bit dimmer as they now have a HUGE talent pool of qualified and experienced officers waiting to join their ships. If they had a choice of paying £26k to an ex-cadet, or £26k to a person who has 5 years of watchkeeping experience I’d assume they’ll take the latter. They no longer advertise jobs externally as they have such large lists of reserves for their ships.

              Princess is hit and miss for employment, I know three people that trained there. One got a job, one didn’t get a job and one waited so long for a job he ended up at Carnival.

              You should go with the company you want, and if it ends up desperate, go with the best company you have an offer from. You are young and have many years to apply for cruise cadetships if your heart is set on it, they take on people in their 30s so you haven’t got a time limit.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by agibbs98 View Post

                Are you talking about Carnival/Cruises there? If so, I’d be wary of whoever has told you that. Of the 20 odd Carnival cadets I’ve known, none are working on cruise ships now. Most were offered jobs but hated it eventually, some left at the end of college as they already hated it. Their current job prospects are a little bit dimmer as they now have a HUGE talent pool of qualified and experienced officers waiting to join their ships. If they had a choice of paying £26k to an ex-cadet, or £26k to a person who has 5 years of watchkeeping experience I’d assume they’ll take the latter. They no longer advertise jobs externally as they have such large lists of reserves for their ships.

                Princess is hit and miss for employment, I know three people that trained there. One got a job, one didn’t get a job and one waited so long for a job he ended up at Carnival.

                You should go with the company you want, and if it ends up desperate, go with the best company you have an offer from. You are young and have many years to apply for cruise cadetships if your heart is set on it, they take on people in their 30s so you haven’t got a time limit.
                I am meaning positions were given to people who qualified from P&O Ferries. Just to clarify

                Comment


                • #9
                  There is missing info here from the OP, and that is why cruise is the preferred option and why those companies in particular?
                  What do they expect cruise work life to be?
                  Maybe answering that will provide a new way of looking at where they are now and where they could go?
                  Thinking back over the years how many times have we seen people have a perception of what ‘cruise’ life and work is, only for those that have been there to blow those perceptions by introducing some reality.
                  Maybe some facts will help this OP to look for the benefits that actually exist in the various ship types rather than the perception of them?
                  I’ve lost track of the amount of times we’ve seen cadets go off on various ship types, then report back it wasn’t anything like they expected sometimes it turned out to be far better than they thought, and other times a big disappointment. There is of course those on board the ships and the training given to cadets which is often extremely variable, but can have huge impacts too.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yes. I will go into it a bit pessimistic and not expect everything then I won't be disappointed. Of course with ferries, it's not a transatlantic crossing there so not much in way of boredom. Of course I understand there will be parts of training I don't enjoy but have to do it as If I get stuck in, I might enjoy it for what it is. Don't expect much from cruise but it's a lot of long passages with lots of long ocean stretches etc. And ferries is long but only by 12 hours at most.

                    And ferries, you work with cargo and passenrers. So win win

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Sampower2001 View Post
                      Yes. I will go into it a bit pessimistic and not expect everything then I won't be disappointed. Of course with ferries, it's not a transatlantic crossing there so not much in way of boredom. Of course I understand there will be parts of training I don't enjoy but have to do it as If I get stuck in, I might enjoy it for what it is. Don't expect much from cruise but it's a lot of long passages with lots of long ocean stretches etc. And ferries is long but only by 12 hours at most.

                      And ferries, you work with cargo and passenrers. So win win
                      Long passages on cruise? Haha... Think arrival into port between 6am - 8am with departure later that day between 1500 - 1800 (odd exceptions for some ports like embarkation etc.). Obviously passengers book to visit places so daytime is spent in port, with passages taking place over night - with the odd sea day thrown in every now and again so the company can extract maximum cash from the captive cargo!

                      With most you're lucky if you'll get to do a transatlantic twice a year if you happen to be on-board as you reposition from Europe to the Caribbean - standby for 5 days of extreme bordom!
                      “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

                      – Mark Twain
                      myBlog | @alistairuk | flickr | youtube Views and opinions expressed are those of myself and not representative of any employer or other associated party.

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