BP sea going uniform - Page 2

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  1. #11

    Retired Radio Officer
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    On a tanker? Only if you want everyone to laugh like a drain
    io parlo morse

  2. #12
    Ha, ok 😅

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve View Post
    If you are not wearing a cummerbund you are not wearing Red Sea rig.
    Maybe in the Navy, but in the MN, from my experience on general cargo, tankers, Ro-ro, gas carriers and container ships Red Sea Rig was Black Shoes, Black long trousers, short sleeve shirt and epaulettes. During that time I sailed with 5 different Companies and the only one that was different was Maersk, where the uniform was all grey and so Red Sea Rig was long grey trousers and short sleeve grey shirt with black shoes.
    I never saw a cummerbund on a real working ship! But having said that I never served on a ship that had cargo that moaned .....
    "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.

    "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

    "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

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    endure (13th August 2017)

  5. #14
    So white shorts not really worn any more then

  6. #15

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    White shorts/pilot shirts are worn when it's hot.
    Black trousers/pilot shirts are worn when it's temperate
    Black trousers/pilot shirts/woolly pulleys are worn when it's cold.

    This is at the discretion of the OM. If the modern BP is anything like the BP I worked for you will be told what dress of the day is. Some OM required anybody on and around the bridge to wear full fig when we had a pilot onboard.
    Passenger ships have different rules.
    io parlo morse

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt247 View Post
    So white shorts not really worn any more then
    When I was at sea uniform had disappeared in the North Sea on Anchor Handlers, but everywhere else uniform was a must, but in all my trips I only had one Old Man who expected caps on the bridge, that was already dying out. If you were on the 12-4 at night you could wear casuals but the rest of the time it was uniform on the bridge. My son, who is a qualified Officer now, tells me that more and more he is finding Uniform can sometimes only be worn when the pilot is on board. Even in the saloon they wear casuals or on watch so I think that apart from the RFA and Cruise Ships it is dying out.

    If you look at uniform lists from most companies these days there is no mention of tropical uniform. I remember it being horrible on tankers going down to fetch the pilot in full tropical and somewhere between the bridge and getting back something got dirty, either my white shoes, or some part of the uniform. It was horrid. Stewards, in order to keep your whites white, used to steep them in a little bleach before washing. The only problem was the stitching used to rot and uniform never lasted long and eventually turned yellow!

    Ian
    "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.

    "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

    "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

  8. #17

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    I used to wear white shorts to dinner. Though Primark ones not the ones sold by the outfitters which looked like old school squash shorts.
    Former TH cadet with experience of cruise ships, buoy tenders, research ships and oil tankers

  9. #18

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    If you look at the history of Red Sea rig it is a less formal evening uniform or dress code than full black tie with waistcoat etc. If you aren't wearing a waistcoat, you need the cummerbund. Any less and you just aren't dressed for dinner. Which was evidently the way things had gone in the late 20th century MN.

    Open neck short sleeve uniform shirt and trousers doesn't need a special name.

  10. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve View Post
    If you look at the history of Red Sea rig it is a less formal evening uniform or dress code than full black tie with waistcoat etc. If you aren't wearing a waistcoat, you need the cummerbund. Any less and you just aren't dressed for dinner. Which was evidently the way things had gone in the late 20th century MN.

    Open neck short sleeve uniform shirt and trousers doesn't need a special name.
    The RFA is a subset of the MN. Red Sea rig might include a cummerbund in the RFA - it doesn't in BP which is what this thread is all about.
    io parlo morse

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    Chiefy (14th August 2017),Hatchorder (15th August 2017)

  12. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve View Post
    If you look at the history of Red Sea rig it is a less formal evening uniform or dress code than full black tie with waistcoat etc. If you aren't wearing a waistcoat, you need the cummerbund. Any less and you just aren't dressed for dinner. Which was evidently the way things had gone in the late 20th century MN.

    Open neck short sleeve uniform shirt and trousers doesn't need a special name.
    Meanwhile back in the real world...............

    Steve, Whatever the RN and RFA may refer to is of absolutley no consequence in a thread about BP and seagoing uniform. I never, ever, ever saw a waistcoat on any ship, or any officer that I ever sailed with. Red Sea Rig was how it was recorded in daily orders, and that is what it was, no waistcoat, no cummerbund, no caps.

    I have spoken to a current 3/O with BP at the moment and asked him where he buys his waistcoat and cummerbund from - I could not tell what he was saying between the snorts, guffaws and laughs.....

    I have no idea who is feeding you sh1te about what happened in the MN in the late 20th Century - but I have a feeling they are in a parallel Universe.......

    Ian
    "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.

    "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

    "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

  13. The following user says Thank You to Hatchorder for this useful post:

    endure (15th August 2017)

 

 
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