Any Engineers working on Bulk Carriers

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  1. #1

    Aspiring Engine Cadet
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    Any Engineers working on Bulk Carriers

    Hi folks,

    Not sure this is the right place to post this question. Basically I am searching for a cadetship and coming from outside of the industry I am trying to get to know it as best as I can before getting in. So I am trying to figure out the nature of the engineering officer on different type of ships.
    I have been told that bulk carriers can spend relatively long times at port compared to say tankers, container ships or cruises for whatever reasons. I would like to know anyones experiences with this. I would want to enjoy some shore leave even though some ports may have security restrictions and the town ports might be not the best for tourism!

    Best Regards to All!

    Paul

  2. #2

    Retired Radio Officer
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    From what others have said you're unlikely, if you're British, to eventually get a job on a bulker but they do often spend a bit of time in discharge ports as they often have to hoof the cargo out using grab cranes. Loading them is a lot quicker as they use conveyor belts with buckets. This is on ore or coal carriers.

    The general nature of jobs for the engineer officer are 'hot, noisy and sweaty'.
    io parlo morse

  3. #3

    Engineer Officer (CoC: EOOW)
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    A bloke I know did a 7 month trip as an engine cadet on bulkers. It sailed between Brazil and Japan. The Brazilian port was a mine in the rainforest, with a conveyor belt jetty throwing coal into the holds, so no shore leave. The Japanese port was much the same, conveyor belts on a jetty in an industrial town. It then went to various anchorages for the rest of the time he was on it. He didn't mind it but wouldn't recommend it, he didn't get a job as they only employ Filipino crew.

  4. #4

    Other (on shore)
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    Bulk carriers can spend as little as 24 hours in port loading. Depending on size and cargo the discharge can take say 7 days. The problem is that berths are often remote hence shore leave restricted.

    The best option is to delay flight home (depending where you are) and see the country. Shore leave is consigned to the history book.

  5. #5

    Deck Officer (CoC: Chief Mate)
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    If one of the reasons you want to go to sea is that you "get paid to see the world", forget about that reason right away. That may have been true pre-1960s when ships spent ages in port and there were large crews so there was plenty of cover to go ashore, air travel was expensive back then too so going to sea was a great way to see the world and get paid for it. But now adays port calls are short and crews are minimum manned so you usually have to work even if there is a little time to go ashore. Air travel is so cheap now, you'll see far more of the world getting a shore job an going on holiday. It's one of the main myths that cadet recruiters push to attract people, the other one being that there is a global shortage of officers, there might be a shortage, but only of ones that are happy to work for peanuts.

  6. #6

    Engineer Officer (CoC: EOOW)
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    June 2012
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    I done my cadet ship on bulk carriers, I would say avoid if you can since they are all Fillipino, Indian or Eastern European crewed you've got no chance of a job with them after you're qualified. You do get good amount of time in ports but it's rarely a place you want to go onshore for long, got lucky with some of the places I went like Antwerp, London and Lithuania but also ended up in Africa, Argentina and Russia.

    If you want to see the best places go for Cruise ships but you'll have to go onshore between your shifts. Every option has it's downside, I did like the bulk carriers since it was fairly relaxed and the crews were easy to get on with.

 

 

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