Orals related questions...

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  1. #1

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    Orals related questions...

    Hi, I have my orals coming up soon however I am unsure of a few things which I cannot seem to find information on etc. If I list them and you can offer any help on any of them I would be very grateful ! (I do know varying amounts for most of these - but would just like some extra clarification and confirmation so I know I am correct.)

    - GMDSS - actions/procedures for each type of alert (DSC,VHF,MF,HF etc.) Does the area have an effect on how you answer or is it down to type of call MF for example.)
    -Lifeboat Compasses and their checks
    - what you need to do if location of fire locker is changed
    - How to get sea surface tempature?
    - Vessel if due to depart soon - propeller checks?
    - setting up NAVTEX for the voyage - including settings you should adjust and what publications you require
    -Calculating wheel over point
    -Hazards in the battery locker
    -Hatch cover details and maintenance
    -How to work out relative wind speed
    - how to take a sun sight (each step etc)
    -Co-tidal chart and uses
    -How to Dead reckon for cel nav.?

  2. #2

    Retired Radio Officer
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    Quote Originally Posted by LJ-14 View Post
    Hi, I have my orals coming up soon however I am unsure of a few things which I cannot seem to find information on etc. If I list them and you can offer any help on any of them I would be very grateful ! (I do know varying amounts for most of these - but would just like some extra clarification and confirmation so I know I am correct.)

    - How to get sea surface tempature?
    The 3rd mate used to use a bucket and a rope...
    io parlo morse

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by endure View Post
    The 3rd mate used to use a bucket and a rope...
    I have lost count of the number of times I threw the bucket over the bridge wing to get it tugged so hard when it filled up it either ripped the rope out of your hands, but if you tied the end on you did not lose the rope, but it then usually ripped the metal handle out of the rubber bucket...... a bit of rope with the remains of a metal handle on the end, lose - lose!

    You got into the habit of lowering it to the waterline and then swinging it back and forth until it went forwards far enough to just dunk it in and grab it out before it went past you.

    Then we had these new fangled insulated thick rubber thermometer buckets, which were solid tubes that did not rip the rope out of your hands but you could leave for a few seconds to adjust to the temperature of the water and then pull it up. It had a special slot in the middle to put the thermometer in once you had it on deck...... which worked great until one cadet on my watch thought it would be much quicker to leave the thermometer in the bucket and throw it over. After I had poured all the bits of glass and mercury into his hand once he got it back on board he now knew why we took the thermometer out before throwing it over. Next time he diligently took the nice, light, new, round thermometer out of the bucket, placed it on the edge of the bridge wing, threw the bucket over and leant over the side long enough to see the new thermometer falling all the way to the sea where he had nudged it with his elbow! The next time he took the thermometer out of the bucket, placed it on the deck of the bridge wing on the rubber matting, threw the bucket over and once it had dipped rang backwards with the rope to bring the bucket up after getting the sample and stood on the thermometer............ He also had to deal with a ringing in his ear for a few minutes as well after he told me, courtesy of one of the pilot books I believe........

    After that out met obs had a missing hole where the sea temp was supposed to be for a few weeks until the Met Office sent us some more thermometers!

    Doh!

    Recognise this Endure?

    BBXX D....D YYGGiw 99LaLaLa QcLoLoLoLo iRixhVV Nddff 00fff 1snTTT 2snTdTdTd 4PPPP 5appp 7wwW1W2 8NhCLCMCH 222Dsvs 0ssTwTwTw 2PwPwHwHw 3dw1dw1dw2dw2 4Pw1Pw1Hw1Hw1 5Pw2Pw2Hw2Hw2 6IsEsEsRs 8swTbTbTb ICE ciSibiDizi

    Or as you always saw it:

    BBXX WCY6777 15124 99559 71459 41496 82324 10075 20048 40123 57031 76162 86827 22262 00042 20302 32433 40806 51003 6//// 80062 ICE /////

    Done every six hours.....I loved doing Met Obs!

    For those sad enough to want to know what it all means..... Look Here!

    Ian
    "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.

    "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

    "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

  4. #4

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    io parlo morse

  5. #5
    OC's Resident CV Guru
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    Quote Originally Posted by endure View Post
    It always annoyed us that it was us that did the work and you who got the prize!

    Stick it up yer........... LOL
    "Any damn fool can navigate the world sober. It takes a really good sailor to do it drunk." - Sir Francis Chichester.

    "Waves are not measured in feet or inches, they are measured in increments of fear." - Buzzy Trent

    "Careers at Sea" Ambassador - Experience of General Cargo, Combo ships, Tanker, Product Carrier, Gas Carrier, Ro-Ro, Reefer Container, Anchor Handlers.

  6. #6

    Retired Radio Officer
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hatchorder View Post
    It always annoyed us that it was us that did the work and you who got the prize!

    Stick it up yer........... LOL
    You had the chance to become an OM and bag a fancy barograph. We just got books
    io parlo morse

  7. #7

    Engineer Officer (CoC: EOOW)
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    Sea surface temperature: my best guess is 1) ask engineers for the sea water general temperature or 2) steal the engineer's infrared temperature guns and point it at the sea.

    Propellor checks: look over the side and check nobody is swimming near them? If variable pitch operate the pitch controls and backup pitch controls, switch to engine control and let the engineers test their pitch control too.

    Battery locker: build up of dangerous Hydrogen gas from charging lead acid batteries, so a potential explosive atmosphere. But most ships don't have this kind of battery so risks are low.

  8. #8

    Deck Officer (CoC: OOW)
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    We just used to phone the control room. Or when I was long carriers could bring it up on the cargo system

  9. #9

    Deck Officer (CoC: OOW)
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    Quote Originally Posted by LJ-14 View Post
    Hi, I have my orals coming up soon however I am unsure of a few things which I cannot seem to find information on etc. If I list them and you can offer any help on any of them I would be very grateful ! (I do know varying amounts for most of these - but would just like some extra clarification and confirmation so I know I am correct.)

    - GMDSS - actions/procedures for each type of alert (DSC,VHF,MF,HF etc.) Does the area have an effect on how you answer or is it down to type of call MF for example.)
    - setting up NAVTEX for the voyage - including settings you should adjust and what publications you require
    GMDSS actions depend on the sea area you are in and what means you receive a distress call by. For example, if you're in sea area A3 and you receive a distress calll by VHF, this will obviously not reach the coast so you can acknowledge it, however, before doing so, call the master. Every vessel is duty bound to assist as far as practicable but acknowledgment puts the onus on you to take action so you would then have to relay via MF/HF.

    If you receive a VHF distress cal in sea area A1, it would be expected that a coast station would acknowledge it. Same as in A2/3 via MF/HF .

    As for the NAVTEX, there sould be a map in ALRS Vol 3 MSI, somewhere that will show all the regions and different letter which you need to code in for your voyage. I'm not on board just now or I'd find it for you. I'm pretty sure its in ALRS Vol 3 but get one out from the library/LRC and have a look through it. You want to know all you ALRS volumes and what they contain for you orals.

    Good Luck!

  10. #10

    Deck Officer (CoC: Master)
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    - GMDSS - actions/procedures for each type of alert (DSC,VHF,MF,HF etc.) Does the area have an effect on how you answer or is it down to type of call MF for example.)
    Generally logic will dictate how you deal with this. So for instance if you receive a distress call on VHF it is much more likely to be close to your position and voice call will confirm that the distress is genuine. MF & HF, you will have a quick look to see if the position is anywhere near your location before plotting it. Ultimately, once you have plotted the position and taken down the pertinent details you will call the Master who will determine the next actions in relation to proper response.

    -Lifeboat Compasses and their checks
    Usually sealed units aren't they? They generally aren't swung or corrected, so it would be a basic check that it reasonably aligns with the ships compass, it certainly isn't going to be accurate. Visual inspection of the unit for cracks and damage.

    - what you need to do if location of fire locker is changed
    Changing the fire locker location isn't something that would be decided onboard, it would involve a recommendation to the superintendent ashore and class approval including changing of the fire plans. Of course supplementary fire lockers with additional equipment can easily be added.

    - How to get sea surface tempature?
    Discussion above, generally can be obtained from Engineers or Engineers ballast/engine room status panel (data from cooling water intake sensor).

    - Vessel if due to depart soon - propeller checks?
    Visual inspection to ensure that the vicinity of the propeller is clear of debris, obstructions, ropes, people (swimmers or divers), etc. If CPP then should be able to perform a full pitch test on hydraulics before the engine is started including use of back up controls then subsequently a quick test once engineers online.

    - setting up NAVTEX for the voyage - including settings you should adjust and what publications you require
    Have a look at the manual and ALRS

    -Calculating wheel over point
    Would need a slightly longer post to go into this one, perhaps Alistair will post about this.

    -Hazards in the battery locker
    Chemical reactions, proper ventilation required, possible spillages, all normal chemical precautions etc.

    -Hatch cover details and maintenance
    This depends on the type of hatch cover you had on your vessels, all will be detailed in manufacturers handbook plus planned maintenance system. You should have done this onboard the ship and be able to logically think through yourself.

    -How to work out relative wind speed


    - how to take a sun sight (each step etc)
    This should have been taught in college and you should have done this for your navigation workbook, again would require an extensive post.

    -Co-tidal chart and uses
    "Co-tidal and co-range charts show lines of equal range and equal times of tides, or data of harmonic constants, for certain areas around the United Kingdom. Two charts cover the area from Dungeness to Hoek van Holland and the southern North Sea. A third covers the British Isles and adjacent waters. The charts are drawn using all the available tidal data, and a knowledge of tidal theory to assist in the necessary interpolation. The reliability of these charts depends on the accuracy and number of tidal observations taken in the area concerned. Since offshore sites for tide-gauges, such as islands, rocks or oil rigs, are seldom suitably placed, offshore data will often depend more on interpolation than that for inshore stations."

    -How to Dead reckon for cel nav.?
    Estimate speed to predict the next position (log speed, speed between last positions, calculated current for area etc) and estimated course allowing for calculated set. Your college notes should provide you several methods for this.

 

 

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